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  1.  8
    Nietzsche's Attack on Belief: Doxastic Skepticism in The Antichrist.Jessica N. Berry - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):187-209.
    Nietzsche's Antichrist is subtitled "A Curse on Christianity." In its last numbered section, he pronounces his "eternal indictment" of two millennia of tradition: —Now I have come to the end and I pronounce my judgment. I condemn Christianity, I indict the Christian church on the most terrible charges an accuser has ever had in his mouth. I consider it the greatest corruption conceivable, it had the will to the last possible corruption. [...] I want to write this eternal indictment of (...)
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  2.  15
    An Interpretation of Nietzsche's On the Uses and Disadvantage of History for Life by Anthony K. Jensen.Jeffrey Church - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):332-335.
    The second of Nietzsche's UM, "On the Uses and Disadvantage of History for Life", is one of his most celebrated and influential works, profoundly shaping the work of Continental theorists such as Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, and Paul de Man. For all the immense attention paid to this little text, philosophers and scholars have focused mainly on Nietzsche's reflections on culture, overlooking the text's epistemological concerns. Jensen's commentary rectifies this omission and succeeds admirably not only in analyzing the often cryptic (...)
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  3.  8
    Making Knowledge the Most Powerful Affect: Overcoming Affective Nihilism.Kaitlyn N. Creasy - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):210-232.
    In an 1881 letter, Nietzsche remarks incredulously that he is "utterly amazed" to have found in Spinoza "a precursor" with whom he shares an "overtendency [...] to make knowledge the most powerful affect."1 It is this tendency to assign knowledge and ways of knowing the functional role of an affect that I intend to investigate as a means of overcoming affective nihilism.2 In particular, it is by participating in certain practices of self-knowledge and introducing oneself, experimentally, to new sites and (...)
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  4.  10
    Nietzsche's Culture of Humanity: Beyond Aristocracy and Democracy in the Early Period by Jeffrey Church.Rachel Cristy - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):336-342.
    Jeffrey Church's book Nietzsche's Culture of Humanity is a flawed but nonetheless significant contribution to the still fairly scant Anglophone literature on Nietzsche's early works. The book argues for two major intertwined theses and a third, less central one. The first thesis is that Nietzsche distinguishes between two types or layers of culture: national culture, which Nietzsche characterizes in §1 of the first essay of UM as "unity of artistic style in all the expressions of the life of a people," (...)
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  5.  17
    Strangers to Ourselves: Self-Knowledge in Nietzsche's Genealogy.Tom R. Hanauer - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):250-271.
    There is a wide scholarly consensus that Nietzsche's GM contains two principal projects. First, GM aims to explain—historically and psychologically—how some of morality's central strands emerged and evolved into their contemporary forms; and, second, GM aims to provide a critical assessment of the value of morality itself. Brian Leiter captures this consensus when he writes, "By investigating the origin of morality Nietzsche hopes to undermine morality or, more precisely, to loosen the attachment of potentially great human beings to this morality."1 (...)
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  6.  10
    The Deed Is Everything: Nietzsche on Will and Action by Aaron Ridley.Lisa Hicks - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):342-347.
    Aaron Ridley's The Deed Is Everything: Nietzsche on Will and Action uses the notion of expressivism to draw together several strands of Nietzschean thought into a view that both challenges and complements previous accounts of agency in general and previous secondary-literature accounts of Nietzsche's view of agency in particular. The book consists of an introduction, six chapters, and a conclusion. In this review, I briefly discuss each chapter with a particular focus on Ridley's distinction between the "letter" and the "spirit" (...)
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  7.  7
    Nietzsche's Transformation of the Problem of Pessimism in Human, All Too Human.Scott Jenkins - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):272-291.
    Book I of HH would seem to announce the end of Nietzsche's concern with the philosophical pessimism that shapes BT and figures prominently in HL. In BT he endorses the pessimistic thesis that the best thing for a human being is to die soon, while he announces in HH that the even the words "optimism" and "pessimism" are outdated since they play a role in a theological discourse that is gradually dying out. This change is connected with another, namely Nietzsche's (...)
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  8.  3
    Three Modes of History in On the Genealogy of Morality.Daisy Laforce - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):292-309.
    Nietzsche's GM 1 is now a recognized masterpiece, but there are still widely varying views about its historical aims and methods.2 What is clear is that Nietzsche's decision to call this work a "genealogy" signals that its purpose is to trace morality's ancestors in the history of human valuing.3 It is also generally agreed that this genealogy is intended to serve a critical function, as Nietzsche himself says, "we need a critique of moral values, for once the value of these (...)
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  9.  34
    Nietzsche on the Origin of Conscience and Obligation.Avery Snelson - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):310-331.
    The second essay of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality (GM) offers a naturalistic and developmental account of the emergence of conscience, a faculty uniquely responsive to remembering and honoring obligations. This article attempts to solve an interpretive puzzle that is invited by the second essay's explanation of nonmoral obligation, prior to the capacity to feel guilt. Ostensibly, Nietzsche argues that the conscience and our concept of obligation originated within contractual (“creditor-debtor”) relations, when creditors punished delinquent debtors (GM II:5). However, this interpretation, (...)
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  10.  15
    Nietzsche and Shame.Joel A. Van Fossen - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):233-249.
    In the preface to GS, Nietzsche famously exclaims, "Those Greeks were superficial—out of profundity!".1 And he attributes one aspect of this profound superficiality to the Greeks' "respect for the bashfulness [Scham] with which nature has hidden behind riddles and iridescent uncertainties". For Nietzsche, both the Greeks' shame and their respect for shame played important and healthy psychological and social roles. So, Nietzsche praises shame in the sense that "care [Scham] for one's reputation" is characteristic of noble types and a "highly (...)
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  11.  10
    Guest Editors' Introduction: Examining Moral Emotions in Nietzsche with the Semantic Web Exploration Tool: Nietzsche.Mark Alfano & Marc Cheong - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):1-10.
    Five years ago, the Journal of Nietzsche Studies published a special issue on Nietzsche and the affects. In it, Aurelia Armstrong wrote generically about the passions, Michael Ure discussed Schadenfreude, Joanne Faulkner addressed disgust, and Joseph Kuzma focused on eroticism.1 In subsequent issues, authors have discussed love,2 emotion in general,3 resentment,4 compassion,5 honor and empathy,6 and affect in general.7 This special section on emotions and reactive attitudes is a chance to take stock of the progress we have made as a (...)
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  12.  14
    Experimentation, Curiosity, and Forgetting.Rebecca Bamford - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):11-32.
    Bernard Reginster has argued that in "Nietzsche's terminology, 'experimentation [Versuch]' is a paradigmatic exercise of curiosity."1 According to Reginster, the kind of curiosity in question, as far as Nietzsche's concept of the free spirit is concerned, is not the state of knowing or of being certain of the truth of some proposition, but is rather a matter of the activity or process of truth seeking and of inquiry.2 My own view is very similar: I have argued that experimentalism is a (...)
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  13.  35
    “Being Just Is Always a Positive Attitude”: Justice in Nietzsche's Virtue Epistemology.Rachel Cristy - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):33-57.
    In the second of the UM, "On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life", Nietzsche delivers a rare and lengthy encomium to the traditional Platonic-Aristotelian virtue of justice. "In truth," he says, "no one has a greater claim to our veneration than he who possesses the drive to and strength for justice. For the highest and rarest virtues are united and concealed in justice as in an unfathomable ocean that receives streams and rivers from all sides and takes them (...)
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  14.  19
    Nietzsche's Great Politics by Hugo Drochon.Christian J. Emden - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):170-174.
    Hugo Drochon's Nietzsche's Great Politics is a well-written and well-argued account of Nietzsche's political vision that presents itself squarely within the tradition of Cambridge School intellectual history. As such, Drochon explicitly rejects interpretations of Nietzsche's political thought that start from the premise of normative democratic theory, but he also fully and rightly rejects any attempt to read Nietzsche's political ideas through the lens of his appropriation by the Nazi regime. Instead, Drochon's aim is to situate Nietzsche in the context of (...)
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  15.  24
    Nietzsche's Psychology of Ressentiment: Revenge and Justice in On the Genealogy of Morals by Guy Elgat.Bernard Reginster - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):174-179.
    In Nietzsche's Psychology of Ressentiment, Guy Elgat develops an interpretation of some of the central themes of Nietzsche's GM, which is one of his most systematic works and a pivotal part of his critique of the modern moral outlook that grew out of Christianity. Elgat's original approach is framed by two fundamental ideas: first, Nietzsche takes the concept of "moral justice" to be central to the morality he sets out to criticize; second, Nietzsche's suspicion toward moral justice is rooted in (...)
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  16.  15
    Nietzsche's Constructivism: A Metaphysics of Material Objects by Justin Remhof.Jared Riggs - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):179-185.
    In Nietzsche's Constructivism: A Metaphysics of Material Objects, Justin Remhof argues that Nietzsche was a constructivist about material objects. That is, Nietzsche held that material objects—like hammers, planets, and dinosaurs—are "constitutively dependent" for their existence on our conceptual practices. Planets exist in part because we deploy the concept planet. Remhof defends this interpretation against its competitors, argues that it helps us understand other areas of Nietzsche's thought, and shows how it relates to the views of certain pragmatists and to contemporary (...)
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  17.  15
    “Let Us Return to Herr Nietzsche”: On Health and Revaluation.Melanie Shepherd - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):125-148.
    In 1886, as Nietzsche's thought becomes more explicitly oriented toward the project of a revaluation of all values, he reframes BT and three middle period books with prefaces. Four out of the five prefaces show Nietzsche noticeably occupied with the theme of health, which serves in each of those four as a lens orienting the reader toward his earlier work. In his "Attempt at Self-Criticism," for instance, Nietzsche suggests that the principal contribution of BT lies in the idea of the (...)
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  18.  42
    Loving the Eternal Recurrence.Neil Sinhababu & Kuong Un Teng - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):106-124.
    According to the doctrine of the eternal recurrence, physical events will repeat themselves in an endless cycle, so everyone will live the same lives again and again for eternity. The first published discussion of the eternal recurrence, in GS, lays out the idea and the emotional responses one might have to it: What if some day or night a demon were to steal into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: "This life as you now live it and have lived (...)
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  19.  16
    Loving the Eternal Recurrence. Sinhababu & Un Teng - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):106.
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  20.  19
    Nietzsche, Self-Disgust, and Disgusting Morality.Joel A. Van Fossen - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):79-105.
    Among other things, Nietzsche considers himself a psychologist, and many of his ideas about human behaviors, dispositions, and attitudes are empirical and falsifiable. As readers of Nietzsche, we should hope that he got some of his psychological facts right. I agree with Joshua Knobe and Brian Leiter when they argue that "neglect of Nietzsche in moral psychology is no longer an option for those philosophers who accept that moral psychology should be grounded in real psychology."1 This article aims at furthering (...)
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  21.  12
    Nietzsche on Nausea.Gudrun Von Tevenar - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):58-78.
    Reading Nietzsche's work, one can be struck and sometimes even offended by his emphatic, occasionally aggressive use of the term "nausea". Not only does Nietzsche use the term frequently in a triple exclamation,1 he also uses it in places where one would expect more differentiated and, arguably, more precise terms, such as "disgust," "disdain," "aversion," "repugnance," "revulsion," "loathing," and the like. Obviously, Nietzsche, that superb master of language, was not lacking an appropriate vocabulary; hence, an explanation for this fact is (...)
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  22.  18
    Nietzsche's Notion of Lying.Yann Wermuth - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):149-169.
    Not only is he lying, who speaks against his knowledge, but even more so he, who speaks against his ignorance [Nichtwissen].Augustine provided the first attempt to define lies in De Mendacio. It is central to his account that lying involves being dishonest. Many still follow Augustine in this. His definition shall serve as a background against which to contrast Nietzsche's notion of lying.2 The dishonesty definition of lying claims that telling a lie involves saying something the liar does not believe (...)
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