Emotion Review

ISSN: 1754-0739

12 found

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  1.  13
    Affect Theory and Literary Criticism.Stephen Ahern - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (2):96-106.
    The “affective turn” is by now long established, part of a wider surge of interest in emotion playing out in a range of disciplines. In literary studies, the conversation about how affect theory might help us to interpret literature is still emerging. The goal of the present discussion is to provide a critical overview of work by scholars who draw on the insights of recent theory to read literary texts written in English. At the same time that the discussion offers (...)
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  2.  19
    Less Is More: How the Language of Fiction Fosters Emotion Recognition.Emanuele Castano - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (2):73-83.
    Stories, in pictorial format, orally narrated, and later on as narrative texts, have played a key role in human evolution and to this day continue to surreptitiously teach us things and skills. In recent decades, psychologists and cognitive scientists have begun documenting the role of stories, and particularly fiction, in refining our sociocognitive skills. In this essay, I focus specifically on how stories, particularly written fiction, hone our emotion recognition skills. I present a brief overview of existing theorizing and research (...)
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  3. Empathy & Literature.A. E. Denham - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (2):84-95.
    There is a long tradition in philosophy and literary theory defending the view that engagement with literature promotes readers’ empathy. Until the last century, few of the empirical claims adduced in that tradition were investigated experimentally. Recent work in psychology and neuropsychology has now shed new light on the interplay of empathy and literature. This article surveys the experimental findings, addressing three central questions: What is it to read empathically? Does reading make us more empathic? What characteristics of literature, if (...)
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  4.  11
    Dhaniya's Anger in Premchand's Godan: Emotion System Activation and Affective Marxism.Lalita Pandit Hogan - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (2):107-116.
    This essay focuses on the anger of Dhaniya, the female protagonist of Premchand's Godan. Rather than approaching it as a specifically feminist anger, it sees it more broadly as the anger of the oppressed, which signals hope that the conditions of oppression will change. Premchand is influenced by Karl Marx, and uses narrative emotion to tell the (Indian) story of labor and capital; this essay puts Panksepp's neurocognitive theory of anger in conversation with Marxist political theory, demonstrating how Marx's thoughts (...)
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  5.  9
    Fairness, Hierarchy, and Moral Rationalization, or What's Wrong With Paradise Lost?Patrick Colm Hogan - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (2):127-136.
    Literature and Moral Feeling argued that ethics is best understood as a constraint on egocentric self-interest. That constraint is specified variously by groups or individuals who set parameters differently within common ethical principles, and who use a range of emotion-guided narrative genres to imagine and evaluate possible actions. Though it covers many ethical concerns (collectively termed “morality”), this account leaves out fairness (alternatively, justice). The following essay seeks to make up for that deficit. Framing its analysis by reference to a (...)
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  6.  9
    Introduction to the Special Issue: “Literature and Emotion”.Bradley J. Irish - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (2):71-72.
    This introduces the special issue “Literature and Emotion.”.
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  7.  4
    Don’t Be Too Good at Reading Other People's Minds.Lisa Zunshine - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (2):117-126.
    Attribution of mental states is fundamental to our engagement with fiction. Crucially, its social content depends on mental states recursively “embedded” within each other; for instance, when a person doesn’t want other people to know about her intentions. Given that some characters seem to be consistently capable of embedding mental states on a higher level than others, this essay reviews factors that may influence authors’ constructions of such mindreading hierarchies as well as their reversals. The argument focuses on the reversal (...)
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  8.  35
    Collective Emotion: A Framework for Experimental Research.Victor Chung, Julie Grèzes & Elisabeth Pacherie - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (1):28-45.
    Research on collective emotion spans social sciences, psychology and philosophy. There are detailed case studies and diverse theories of collective emotion. However, experimental evidence regarding the universal characteristics, antecedents and consequences of collective emotion remains sparse. Moreover, current research mainly relies on emotion self-reports, accounting for the subjective experience of collective emotion and ignoring their cognitive and physiological bases. In response to these challenges, we argue for experimental research on collective emotion. We start with an overview of theoretical frameworks to (...)
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  9.  14
    Neo-emotions: An Interdisciplinary Research Agenda.Marci D. Cottingham - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (1):5-15.
    Emotion research that attends to the cultural dynamics of affective life remains underdeveloped. I outline an agenda for an understudied phenomenon that can orient emotion researchers to the situated, cultural practices of affective life: Neo-emotions. Neo-emotions, when situated within macro-level processes and cultural events, illustrate the constrained yet creative practices that social actors use to address the disconnect between one's emotional vocabulary and dynamic environment. As such, neo-emotions are analytically rich cultural practices that can be empirically explored through sociological, anthropological, (...)
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  10.  14
    The Evolutionary Function of Awe: A Review and Integrated Model of Seven Theoretical Perspectives.Antonia Lucht & Hein T. van Schie - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (1):46-63.
    This narrative review aims to contribute to the scientific literature on awe by reviewing seven perspectives on the evolutionary function of awe. Each is presented with accompanying empirical evidence and suggestions for research investigating unanswered questions. Based on the existing perspectives, this review proposes an integrated evolutionary model of awe, postulating the evolutionary selection of awe through three adaptive domains: (1) social cooperation, (2) reflective processing, and (3) signaling suitability as a potential mate.
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  11.  11
    Why We Mimic Emotions Even When No One is Watching: Limited Visual Contact and Emotional Mimicry.Michal Olszanowski & Monika Wróbel - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (1):16-27.
    This article explores interpersonal functions of emotional mimicry under the absence versus the presence of visual contact between the interacting partners. We review relevant literature and stress that previous studies on the role of emotional mimicry were focused on imitative responses to facial displays. We also show that the rules explaining why people mimic facial expressions may be inapplicable when visual signals are unavailable (e.g., people attending an online meeting have their cameras off). Overall, our review suggests that emotional mimicry (...)
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  12.  17
    On the Invalidity of Neta and Kim's Argument That Surprise is Always Valenced.Andrew Ortony & James A. Russell - 2024 - Emotion Review 16 (1):64-67.
    In a challenge to Basic Emotion theories, Ortony suggested in a recent article that the existence of affect-free surprise means that surprise is not necessarily valenced and therefore arguably not an emotion. In an article in response, Neta and Kim argued that surprise is always valenced and therefore is an emotion, with apparent cases of affect-free surprise actually being cases of the cognitive state of unexpectedness rather than surprise. We view Neta and Kim's position as resting on an idiosyncratic stipulation (...)
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