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  1.  1
    ‘The Object of Sense and Experiment’: The Ontology of Sensation in William Hunter's Investigation of the Human Gravid Uterus.Richard T. Bellis - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):227-246.
    William Hunter's anatomical inquiry employed all of his senses, but how did his personal experiences with the cadaver become generalized scientific knowledge teachable to students and understandable by fellow practitioners? Moving beyond a historiographical focus on Hunter's images and extending Lorraine Daston's concept of an ‘ontology of scientific observation’ to include non-visual senses, I argue that Hunter's work aimed to create a stabilized object of the cadaver that he and his students could perceive in common. Crucial to this stabilization was (...)
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  2.  1
    Veronica Della Dora, The Mantle of the Earth: Genealogies of a Geographical Metaphor Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2021. Pp. 416. ISBN 978-0-2267-4129-1. $65.00 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Mette Bruinsma - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):249-250.
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  3.  5
    Einsteinian Language: Max Talmey, Benjamin Lee Whorf and Linguistic Relativity.Michael D. Gordin - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):145-165.
    This paper explores the significant – albeit little-known – impact that physicist Albert Einstein's theory of relativity had on the development of the science of linguistics. Both Max Talmey, a physician who played a key role in the development of early twentieth-century constructed-language movements, and Benjamin Lee Whorf, who is closely associated with the notion of ‘linguistic relativity’, drew on their understanding of relativity to develop their ideas. Linguistic relativity, which posits that humans’ linguistic categories shape their perceptions of nature, (...)
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  4.  1
    Claire Hickman, The Doctor's Garden: Medicine, Science, and Horticulture in Britain New Haven: Yale University Press, 2021. Pp. Xiv + 238. ISBN 978-0-3002-3610-1. £30.00 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Charlotte Holmes - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):253-255.
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  5.  2
    Science by Nobel Committee: Decision Making and Norms of Scientific Practice in the Early Physics and Chemistry Prizes.Gustav Källstrand - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):187-205.
    This paper examines the early years of decision making in the award of the Nobel Prize in physics and chemistry, and shows how the prize became a tool in the boundary work which upheld the social demarcations between scientists and inventors, as well as promoting a particular normative view of individual scientific achievement. The Nobel committees were charged with rewarding scientific achievements that benefited humankind: their interpretation of that criterion, however, turned in the first instance on their assessment of the (...)
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  6.  2
    ‘Armed with the Necessary Background of Knowledge’: Embedding Science Scrutiny Mechanisms in the UK Parliament.Emmeline Ledgerwood - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):167-185.
    The unprecedented circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic have intensified the demands placed upon parliamentarians to scrutinize and evaluate evidence-based government proposals, making visible the parliamentary mechanisms that enable them to do so. This paper examines the steps that led two such mechanisms to become embedded in the institution of Parliament during from 1964 to 2001: the House of Commons Select Committee on Science and Technology and the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology. Drawing on official papers, Hansard records and unpublished (...)
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  7.  1
    Thomas Simpson, The Frontier in British India: Space, Science and Power in the Nineteenth Century Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021. Pp. Xvi + 298. ISBN 978-1-1088-7915-6. £75.00 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Sebastian James Rose - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):250-252.
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  8.  2
    Caribou Crossings: The Trans-Alaska Pipeline System, Conservation, and Stakeholdership in the Anthropocene.Simone Schleper - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):127-143.
    This article engages with notions of conservation in the Anthropocene from a history-of-science perspective. It does so by looking at an iconic case of infrastructure development that since the 1970s continues to cause controversies amongst wildlife experts: the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System. I examine how, from the 1970s onwards, the TAPS functioned as an experimental device for ecologists to test the adaptability of migratory caribou to changed environments and their dependency on unaltered ranges. Based on archival research, published reports and interviews, (...)
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  9.  4
    Amir Teicher, Social Mendelism: Genetics and the Politics of Race in Germany, 1900–1948 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021. Pp. Xiv + 268. ISBN 978-1-1084-9949-1. £26.99 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Aisling Shalvey - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):252-253.
  10.  1
    Dipesh Chakrabarty, The Climate of History in a Planetary Age Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2021. Pp. 296. ISBN 978-0-2267-3286-2. $25.00 (Paperback). [REVIEW]Zane Šime - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):247-248.
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  11.  1
    ‘A Remedy for This Dread Disease’: Achille Sclavo, Anthrax and Serum Therapy in Early Twentieth-Century Britain.James F. Stark - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):207-226.
    In the years around 1900 one of the most significant practical consequences of new styles of bacteriological thought and practice was the development of preventive vaccines and therapeutic sera. Historical scholarship has highlighted how approaches rooted in the laboratory methods of Robert Koch, Louis Pasteur and their collaborators were transformed in local contexts and applied in diverse ways to enable more effective disease identification, prevention and treatment. Amongst these, the anti-anthrax serum developed by the Italian physician Achille Sclavo has received (...)
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  12.  1
    Jennifer M. Rampling, The Experimental Fire: Inventing English Alchemy, 1300–1700 Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2020. Pp. 416. ISBN 978-0-2267-1070-9. £28.00/$35.00 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Richard Dunn - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (1):119-120.
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  13.  2
    William Beinart and Saul Dubow, The Scientific Imagination in South Africa: 1700 to the Present Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2022, Pp. 406. ISBN 987-1-1088-3708-8. £64.99 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Gianamar Giovannetti-Singh - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (1):121-122.
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  14.  3
    ‘Not Birth, Marriage or Death, but Gastrulation’: The Life of a Quotation in Biology.Nick Hopwood - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (1):1-26.
    This history of a statement attributed to the developmental biologist Lewis Wolpert exemplifies the making and uses of quotations in recent science. Wolpert's dictum, ‘It is not birth, marriage or death, but gastrulation which is truly the most important time in your life’, was produced in a series of international shifts of medium and scale. It originated in his vivid declaration in conversation with a non-specialist at a workshop dinner, gained its canonical form in a colleague's monograph, and was amplified (...)
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  15.  6
    Elena Aronova, Scientific History: Experiments in History and Politics From the Bolshevik Revolution to the End of the Cold War Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2021. Pp. 256. ISBN 978-0-2267-6138-1. $45.00 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Alex Langstaff - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (1):124-126.
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  16.  11
    Mapping the Invisible: Knowledge, Credibility and Visions of Earth in Early Modern Cave Maps.Johannes Mattes - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (1):53-80.
    This paper examines cave environments as unique spaces of knowledge production and shows how visualizations of natural cavities in maps came to be powerful tools in scientific reasoning. Faced with the challenge of limited vision, mapmakers combined empiricism and imagination in an experimental setting and developed specific translation strategies to deal with the uncertain origin of underground objects and the shifting boundaries between the known and the unknown. By deconstructing this type of cartographic representation, which has barely been studied, this (...)
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  17.  1
    ‘The Troubles of Collecting’: William Henry Harvey and the Practicalities of Natural-History Collecting in Britain's Nineteenth-Century World.John McAleer - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (1):81-100.
    In recent decades, historians have become increasingly interested in the logistical challenges and difficulties encountered by those responsible for the collection, preservation and safe transport of specimens from the field to the museum or laboratory. This article builds on this trend by looking beyond apparent successes to consider the practices and practicalities of shipboard travel and maritime and coastal collecting activities. The discussion focuses on the example of William Henry Harvey, who travelled to Australia in pursuit of cryptogams – non-flowering (...)
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  18.  4
    Descartes on Fermentation in Digestion: Iatromechanism, Analogy and Teleology.Carmen Schmechel - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (1):101-116.
    Fermentation is a cornerstone phenomenon in Cartesian physiology, accounting for processes such as digestion or blood formation. I argue that the previously unrecognized conceptual tension between the terms ‘fermentation’ and ‘concoction’ reflects Descartes's efforts towards a novel, more thoroughly mechanistic theory of physiology, set up against both Galenism and chymistry. Similarities with chymistry as regards fermentation turn out either epistemologically superficial, or based on shared earlier sources. Descartes tentatively employs ‘fermentation’ as a less teleological alternative to ‘concoction’, later renouncing the (...)
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  19.  1
    Diarmid A. Finnegan, The Voice of Science: British Scientists on the Lecture Circuit in Gilded Age America Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021. Pp. Xiii + 286. ISBN 978-0-8229-4681-6. $60.00 (Hardback). [REVIEW]James A. Secord - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (1):117-119.
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  20.  2
    Mark A. Waddell, Magic, Science and Religion in Early Modern Europe Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021. Pp. 220. ISBN 978-1-1083-4823-2. £69.99/£19.99 (Hardback/Paperback). [REVIEW]Neil Tarrant - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (1):123-124.
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  21.  2
    Imperial Entomology: Boris P. Uvarov and Locusts, C.1920–C.1950.Michael Worboys - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (1):27-51.
    In this article, I explore how the twin forces of imperial and entomological power allowed Britain to shape locust research and control across Africa, the Middle East and South Asia from the 1920s to the early 1950s. Imperial power came from the size of the formal and informal empire, and alliances with other colonial powers to tackle a common threat to agriculture and trade. Entomological authority came primarily from the work of Boris Uvarov and his small team of museum and (...)
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