British Journal for the History of Science

ISSNs: 0007-0874, 1474-001X

71 found

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  1.  4
    Frederico Freitas, Nationalizing Nature: Iguazu Falls and National Parks at the Brazil–Argentina Border Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021. Pp. 333. ISBN 978-1-1088-4483-3. $103.00 (hardcover). [REVIEW]Maria Amuchastegui - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):579-582.
  2.  2
    Lachlan Fleetwood, Science on the Roof of the World: Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2022. Pp. 294. ISBN: 978-1-009-12311-2. £75.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Katherine Arnold - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):582-583.
  3.  3
    Niche development: the International Foundation for Science and the road to Sweden.Jenny Beckman - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):553-566.
    This paper examines the crowded landscape of conferences and organizations within which the International Foundation for Science (IFS) was shaped in the early 1970s. The IFS aimed to support scientists from developing countries, circumventing the bureaucracy of established international organizations such as UNESCO and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The new foundation was a potential rival to such institutions, which ironically provided the conditions essential to its emergence. Their conferences, board meetings and assemblies, where scientists and policy (...)
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  4. Communicating science, mediating presence: reflections on the present, past and future of conferencing.Charlotte Bigg - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):567-577.
    The move online of almost all meetings in 2020 in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic threw into sharp relief the taken-for-granted centrality of conferences within scientific culture. While its impact on science has yet to be fully grasped, for the authors of this special issue, this situation held heuristic power for understanding the meanings and functions, now and historically, of international scientific conferencing. Ongoing discussions in the academic world about the pros and cons of virtual meetings bring out the (...)
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  5.  1
    The art of gathering: histories of international scientific conferences.Charlotte Bigg, Jessica Reinisch, Geert Somsen & Sven Widmalm - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):423-433.
    Hundreds of thousands of conferences have taken place since their first appearance in the late eighteenth century, yet the history of science has often treated them as stages for scientific practice, not as the play itself. Drawing on recent work in the history of science and of international relations, the introduction to this special issue suggests avenues for exploring the phenomenon of the international scientific conference, broadly construed, by highlighting the connected dimensions of communication, sociability and international relations. It lays (...)
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  6.  2
    Grant Ramsey and Andreas De Block (eds), The Dynamics of Science: Computational Frontiers in History and Philosophy of Science Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2022. Pp. 308. ISBN 978-0-8229-4737-0. $60.00 (hardcover). [REVIEW]Tim Boon - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):584-585.
  7.  3
    Claire G. Jones, Alison E. Martin and Alexis Wolf (eds), The Palgrave Handbook of Women and Science since 1660 London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022. Pp. 658. ISBN 978-3-0307-8972-5. £149.99 (hardcover). [REVIEW]Grace Exley - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):586-587.
  8.  7
    Sex, science and curated community at the World League for Sexual Reform 1929 conference.Laura C. Forster - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):469-484.
    This article interrogates the scientific conference as a means by which the organizers of the World League for Sexual Reform's 1929 conference attempted to marshal the ‘scientific spirit’ in order to present progressive sexual reform as a rational and scientifically informed undertaking. The conference was carefully curated to make the sex reform movement (and the assorted characters that gathered under its banner) look serious, legitimate and, most importantly, scientific. The conference was also an attempt by organizer Norman Haire to exert (...)
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  9.  3
    Michel Morange, The Black Box of Biology: A History of the Molecular Revolution Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2020. Pp. 528. ISBN 978-0-6742-8136-3. £40.95 (hardcover). [REVIEW]Jean-Baptiste Grodwohl - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):588-589.
  10.  2
    Johan Alfredo Linthorst, Research between Science, Society and Politics: The History and Scientific Development of Green Chemistry Utrecht: Eburon, 2023. Pp. 268. ISBN 978-9-4630-1434-2. €36.00 (paperback). [REVIEW]Matthew Holmes - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):589-591.
  11.  8
    Marco Tamborini, The Architecture of Evolution: The Science of Form in Twentieth-Century Evolutionary Biology Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2022. Pp. 283. ISBN: 978-0-8229-4735-6. $455.00 (hardcover). [REVIEW]Tim Horder - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):591-593.
  12.  4
    Hannah Wills, Sadie Harrison, Erika Jones, Rebecca Martin and Farrah Lawrence-Mackey (eds.), Women in the History of Science: A Sourcebook London: UCL Press, 2023. Pp. xxviii + 446. ISBN 978-1-8000-8415-5. £50.00 (hardback); £30.00 (paperback); £0.00 (open-access PDF). [REVIEW]Sally Gregory Kohlstedt - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):593-595.
  13. Functional informality: crafting social interaction toward scientific productivity at the Gordon Research Conferences, 1950–1980.Georgiana Kotsou - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):519-534.
    In the early and mid-twentieth century, scientific conferences were a popular tool to establish communication between scientists. Organisational efforts, research and funds were spent defining what makes a productive and successful scientific gathering. A unique example of this was the monitoring and evaluation system of the Gordon Research Conferences (GRCs), which conceptualized informal communication in small, specialized meetings as the best method of advancing cutting-edge research. Studying the detailed monitoring reports of the sessions and the evaluation forms filled by the (...)
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  14.  3
    Michelle DiMeo, Lady Ranelagh: The Incomparable Life of Robert Boyle's Sister Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2021. Pp. 296. ISBN 978-0-226-73160-5. $45.00 (cloth). [REVIEW]Odile Manon Lehnen - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):595-596.
  15.  2
    Negotiating the norms of an international science: standardization work at the International Geological Congress, 1878–1891.Thomas Mougey - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):435-451.
    In the second half of the nineteenth century, geologists created the International Geological Congress (IGC) to achieve the methodological and terminological uniformity that they thought their science lacked. Their desire to standardize their practice and their use of the conference to do so was neither new nor unique. Although late nineteenth-century international conferences have been recognized as important arenas of standardization, relatively little is known of the ways in which conferences organized standardization negotiations. This article aims to fill this gap (...)
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  16.  1
    Alida C. Metcalf, Mapping an Atlantic World, circa 1500 Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2020. Pp. 224. ISBN 978-1-4214-3852-8. $57.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Benjamin B. Olshin - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):597-598.
  17.  3
    Nancy Rose Marshall (ed.), Victorian Science and Imagery: Representation and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021, Pp. 365, ISBN 978-0-8229-4653-3. $55.00 (hardcover). [REVIEW]Greg Priest - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):598-600.
  18.  1
    Technical conferences as a technique of internationalism.Jessica Reinisch - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):485-502.
    This paper looks at a genre of meetings that, while neither purely ‘scientific’ nor ‘diplomatic’, drew on elements from both professional spheres and gained prominence in the interwar decades and during the Second World War. It proposes to make sense of ‘technical conferences’ as a phenomenon that was made by and through scientific experts and politicians championing the organizing power of rationality, science and liberal internationalism. Against the background of swelling ranks of state-employed scientists, this paper documents the emergence of (...)
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  19.  2
    Raf de Bont, Nature's Diplomats: Science, Internationalism, and Preservation, 1920–1960 Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021. Pp. x + 373. ISBN 978-0-8229-4661-8. $55.00 (cloth). [REVIEW]Peder Roberts - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):600-601.
  20.  3
    Ian M. Miller, Fir and Empire: The Transformation of Forests in Early Modern China Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2020. Pp. 265. ISBN 978-0-2957-4733-0. $40.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Hiroki Shin - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):602-603.
  21.  6
    Arie Rip, Nanotechnology and Its Governance London: Routledge, 2019. Pp. 158. ISBN 978-1-1386-1053-8. £130.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Massimiliano Simons - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):604-605.
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  22.  1
    Simon Jarrett, Those They Called Idiots: The Idea of the Disabled Mind from 1700 to the Present Day London: Reaktion Books, 2020. Pp. 352. ISBN 978-1-78914-301-0. £25.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Svein Atle Skålevåg - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):605-607.
  23. ‘The goddess that we serve’: projecting international community at the first serial chemistry conferences, 1893–1914.Geert Somsen - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):453-467.
    The emergence of conferences in the late nineteenth century significantly changed the ways in which the international scientific community functioned and experienced itself. In the early modern Republic of Letters, savants mainly related through print and correspondence, and apart from at local and later national levels, scholars rarely met. International conferences, by contrast, brought scientists together regularly, in the flesh and in great numbers. Their previously imagined community now became tangible. This paper examines how conferencing reshaped the collective of international (...)
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  24. Nina R. Gelbart, Minerva's French Sisters: Women of Science in Enlightenment France New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2021. Pp. 360. ISBN 978-0-3002-5256-9. $40.00 (hardcover). [REVIEW]Tom Stammers - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):607-609.
  25.  2
    ‘Super Bowl of the world conference circuit’? A network approach to high-level science and policy conferencing.Sven Widmalm - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):535-551.
    Elite conferences, such as the Nobel Symposia organized by the Nobel Foundation since 1965, have often put a premium on the uninhibited exchange of ideas rather than the broad exchange of information. Nobel Symposium 14, The Place of Value in a World of Fact (1969), combined this ethos with the ambition to engage with ‘world problems’ that were thought by many at the time to constitute a global crisis. This paper examines the relationship between the Nobel Foundation's ideal of scientific (...)
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  26. Christoph Irmscher, The Poetics of Natural History, 2nd edn New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2019. Pp. 403. ISBN 978-1-9788-0586-6. $43.95 (paperback). [REVIEW]Lisa Winters - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):609-610.
  27.  3
    The Pugwash scientists’ conferences, Cyrus Eaton and the clash of internationalisms, 1954–1961.Waqar H. Zaidi - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (4):503-517.
    This paper examines the contest between Canadian American industrialist Cyrus Eaton and the Pugwash scientists’ leadership for influence over the early Pugwash scientists’ conferences. Eaton's activism has generally been dismissed in the historical literature as ineffective, naive and too uncritical of the Soviet Union. This paper argues that he was genuinely committed to international peace and security, that Eaton shared with Pugwash scientists a belief in the importance of intellectuals to global unity, and that he worked to bring about greater (...)
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  28.  3
    What mysteries lay in spore: taxonomy, data, and the internationalization of mycology in Saccardo's Sylloge Fungorum.Brad Bolman - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):369-390.
    Italian mycologist Pier Andrea Saccardo is best remembered for his monumental Sylloge Fungorum, the first ‘modern’ effort to compile all identified fungi within a single classification scheme. The existing history of mycology is limited and has primarily focused on developments within England, but this article argues that Saccardo and his collaborators on the Sylloge supported a vital transnational expansion of mycological knowledge exchange and played a crucial role in stabilizing the tangled knot of local naming and identification among the world's (...)
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  29.  2
    Presidential Address ‘Some years of cudgelling my brains about the nature and function of science museums’: Frank Sherwood Taylor and the public role of the history of science.Tim Boon - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):283-307.
    Frank Sherwood Taylor was director of the Science Museum London for just over five years from October 1950. He was the only historian of science ever to have been director of this institution, which has always ridden a tightrope between advocacy of science and advocacy of its history, balancing differently at different points in its history. He was also president of the BSHS from 1951 to 1953. So what happened when a historian got his hands on the nation's pre-eminent public (...)
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  30.  10
    Frederick Burkhardt, James Secord and the editors of the Darwin Correspondence Project (eds.), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin_, volume _22, 1874 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. Pp. 855. ISBN 978-1-1070-8872-6. £105.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Peter J. Bowler - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):409-410.
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  31.  2
    Andrew Fiss, A History of Communication and Anxiety in the American Mathematics Classroom New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2020. Pp. 216. ISBN 978-1-9788-2021-0. $150.00 (cloth). [REVIEW]David E. Dunning - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):411-412.
  32.  2
    Transformations: the material representation of historical experiments in science teaching.Peter Heering - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):351-368.
    Some experiments from the history of physics became so famous that they not only made it into the textbook canon but were transformed into lecture demonstration performances and student laboratory activities in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. While, at first glance, some of these demonstrations as well as the related instruments do resemble their historical ancestors, a closer examination reveals significant differences both in the instruments themselves and in the practices and meanings associated with them. In this paper, I analyse (...)
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  33.  18
    Van Leeuwenhoek – the film: remaking memory in Dutch science cinema 1925– c. 1960.Mieneke te Hennepe - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):329-349.
    This paper examines how the production, content and reception of the film Antony van Leeuwenhoek (1924) influenced the historical framing of science. The film features microcinematography by the pioneering Dutch filmmaker Jan Cornelis Mol (1891–1954), and was part of a dynamic process of commemorating seventeenth-century microscopy and bacteriology through an early instance of visual re-creation – a new way of using scientific material heritage, and of enabling audiences to supposedly observe the world of microscopic organisms in just the same way (...)
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  34.  1
    Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen, Freud's Patients: A Book of Lives London: Reaktion Books, 2021. Pp. 304. ISBN 978-1-7891-4455-0. £20.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Sarah Holland - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):413-414.
  35.  2
    A plague of weasels and ticks: animal introduction, ecological disaster, and the balance of nature in Jamaica, 1870–1900.Matthew Holmes - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):391-407.
    Towards the end of the nineteenth century, British colonists in Jamaica became increasingly exasperated by the damage caused to their sugar plantations by rats. In 1872, a British planter attempted to solve this problem by introducing the small Indian mongoose (Urva auropunctata). The animals, however, turned on Jamaica's insectivorous birds and reptiles, leading to an explosion in the tick population. This paper situates the mongoose catastrophe as a closing chapter in the history of the nineteenth-century acclimatization movement. While foreign observers (...)
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  36.  1
    Richard Noakes, Physics and Psychics: The Occult and the Sciences in Modern Britain Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019. Pp. 419. ISBN 978-1-3168-8243-6. £90.00 (hardcover). [REVIEW]Bruce J. Hunt - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):415-416.
  37.  5
    Aileen Fyfe, Noah Moxham, Julie McDougal-Waters and Camilla Mørk Røstvik, A History of Scientific Journals: Publishing at the Royal Society, 1665–2015 London: UCL Press, 2022. Pp. 643. ISBN 978-1-8000-8234-2. £60.00 (hardcover), £0.00 (open-access pdf). Doi:10.14324/111.9781800082328. [REVIEW]Paul Ranford - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):416-418.
  38.  3
    From museumization to decolonization: fostering critical dialogues in the history of science with a Haida eagle mask.Efram Sera-Shriar - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):309-328.
    This paper explores the process from museumization to decolonization through an examination of a Haida eagle mask currently on display in the Exploring Medicine gallery at the Science Museum in London. While elements of this discussion are well developed in some disciplines, such as Indigenous studies, anthropology and museum and heritage studies, this paper approaches the topic through the history of science, where decolonization and global perspectives are still gaining momentum. The aim therefore is to offer some opening perspectives and (...)
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  39.  6
    Robert J. Sternberg and Wade E. Pickren (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of the Intellectual History of Psychology Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019. Pp. 533. ISBN 978-1-1084-1869-0. $210.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Roger Smith - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):418-419.
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  40.  2
    J. David Archibald, Critical Lives: Charles Darwin London: Reaktion Books, 2021. Pp. 240. ISBN 978-1-7891-4440-6. $19.00 (paperback). [REVIEW]Lisa Winters - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (3):420-421.
  41.  11
    Showcasing the international atom: the IAEA Bulletin as a visual science diplomacy instrument, 1958–1962.Matthew Adamson - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):205-223.
    When the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) began operations in 1958, one of its first routine tasks was to create and circulate a brief non-technical periodical. This article analyses the creation of theIAEA Bulletinand its circulation during its first years. It finds that diplomatic imperatives both in IAEA leadership circles and in the networks outside them shaped the form and appearance of the bulletin. In the hands of the IAEA's Division of Public Information, the bulletin became an instrument of science (...)
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  42.  6
    Picturing Chinese science: wartime photographs in Joseph Needham's science diplomacy.Gordon Barrett - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):185-203.
    Joseph Needham occupies a central position in the historical narrative underpinning the most influential practitioner-derived definition of ‘science diplomacy’. The brief biographical sketch produced by the Royal Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science sets Needham's activities in the Second World War as an exemplar of a science diplomacy. This article critically reconsiders Needham's wartime activities, shedding light on the roles played by photographs in those diplomatic activities and his onward dissemination of them as part of his (...)
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  43.  10
    Cartoon diplomacy: visual strategies, imperial rivalries and the 1890 British Ultimatum to Portugal.Maria Paula Diogo, Paula Urze & Ana Simões - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):147-166.
    This paper offers a novel interpretation of the 1890 British Ultimatum, by bringing to the front of the stage its techno-diplomatic dimension, often invisible in the canonical diplomatic and military narratives. Furthermore, we use an unconventional historical source to grasp the British–Portuguese imperial conflict over the African hinterland via the building of railways: the cartoons of the politically committed and polyvalent Portuguese artist and journalist Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro (1846–1905), published in his journal Ponto nos iis, from the end of 1889 (...)
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  44.  8
    Jacqueline Mitton and Simon Mitton, Vera Rubin: A Life Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2021. Pp. x + 309. ISBN 978-0-6749-1919-8. £23.95 (hardback). [REVIEW]Patricia Fara - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):278-279.
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  45.  5
    Satellite images as tools of visual diplomacy: NASA's ozone hole visualizations and the Montreal Protocol negotiations.Sebastian V. Grevsmühl & Régis Briday - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):247-267.
    On 16 September 1987, the main chlorofluorocarbon-producing and -consuming countries signed the Montreal Protocol, despite the absence of a scientific consensus on the mechanisms of ozone depletion over Antarctica. We argue in this article that the rapid diffusion from late 1985 onwards of satellite images showing the Antarctic ozone hole played a significant role in this diplomatic outcome. Whereas negotiators claimed that they chose to deliberately ignore the Antarctic ozone hole during the negotiations since no theory was able yet to (...)
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  46.  5
    Matthew H. Edney, Cartography: The Ideal and Its History Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2019. Pp. 296. ISBN: 978-0-2266-0568-5. $32.00 (paperback). [REVIEW]Emily Hayes - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):269-271.
  47.  4
    Hans Radder, From Commodification to the Common Good: Reconstructing Science, Technology and Society Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019. Pp. 312. ISBN 978-0-8229-4579-6. $50.00 (hardcover). [REVIEW]Beck Chamberlain Heslop - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):271-273.
  48.  9
    Andrew Cunningham, ‘I Follow Aristotle’: How William Harvey Discovered the Circulation of the Blood London: Routledge, 2022. Pp. xii + 180. ISBN 987-1-0321-6223-2. £130.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Ludmilla Jordanova - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):273-274.
  49.  4
    Dylan Mulvin, Proxies: The Cultural Work of Standing In London: MIT Press, 2021. Pp. 228. ISBN 978-0-2620-4514-8. £40.00 (paperback). – CORRIGENDUM. [REVIEW]Harry Law - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):281-281.
  50.  7
    The visual diplomacy of cancer treatments: the mediatic legacy of the Curies in the early transnational fight against cancer.Beatriz Medori - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):167-183.
    This paper analyses the role played by members of the Curie family in the visual diplomacy of cancer treatments. This relationship started in 1921, when Marie Curie travelled to the US, accompanied by her two daughters, Ève and Irène, to receive a gram of radium at the White House from President Warren Harding. In the years that followed, Ève Curie, as the biographer and natural heir of radium discoverers Marie and Pierre Curie, continued to contribute to the visual diplomacy of (...)
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  51.  5
    Paula De Vos, Compound Remedies: Galenic Pharmacy from the Ancient Mediterranean to New Spain Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021. Pp. 404. ISBN 978-0-8229-4649-6 $50.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Sophia Spielmann - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):275-276.
  52.  3
    Representing noise: stacked plots and the contrasting diplomatic ambitions of radio astronomy and post-punk.Simone Turchetti - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):225-245.
    Sketched in 1979 by graphic designer Peter Saville, the record sleeve of Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures seemingly popularized one of the most celebrated radio-astronomical images: the ‘stacked plot’ of radio signals from a pulsar. However, the sleeve's designer did not have this promotion in mind. Instead, he deliberately muddled the message it originally conveyed in a typical post-punk act of artistic sabotage. In reconstructing the historical events associated with this subversive effort, this essay explores how, after its adoption as an (...)
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  53.  8
    Introduction: Power to the image! Science, technology and visual diplomacy.Simone Turchetti & Matthew Adamson - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):135-146.
    This special issue explores the power that images with a techno-scientific content can have in international relations. As we introduce the articles in the collection, we highlight how the study of this influence extends current research in the separate (but increasingly interacting) domains of history of science and technology, and political science. We then show how images of different types (photographs, cartoons and plots) can inform inter-state transactions through their public appeal alongside the better-studied dialogic practices of the diplomatic arena. (...)
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  54.  2
    Peter H. Hoffenberg, A Science of Our Own: Exhibitions and the Rise of Australian Public Science Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019. Pp. 206. ISBN 978-0-8229-4576-5. $45.00 (cloth). [REVIEW]Lisa Winters - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):276-277.
  55.  8
    The winter of raw computers: the history of the lunar and planetary reductions of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich.Daniel Belteki - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):65-81.
    In 1839 the working hours of the computers employed on the lunar and planetary reductions of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich were reduced from eleven hours to eight hours. Previous historians have explained this decrease by reference to the generally benevolent nature of the manager of the reductions, George Biddell Airy. By contrast, this article uses the letters and notes exchanged between Airy and the computers to demonstrate that the change in the working hours originated from the computers as a reaction (...)
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  56.  9
    Daniel S. Milo, Good Enough: The Tolerance for Mediocrity in Nature and Society Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2019. Pp. 310. ISBN 978-0-6745-0462-2. $28.95 (hardback). [REVIEW]Stefan Bernhardt-Radu - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):117-119.
  57.  4
    Claudine Cohen, Nos ancêtres dans les arbres: Penser l’évolution humaine Paris: Editions du Seuil, 2021. Pp. 319. ISBN 978-2-0211-7599-8. €23.00 (paperback). [REVIEW]Peter J. Bowler - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):128-129.
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  58.  7
    Ben Nobbs-Thiessen, Landscape of Migration: Mobility and Environmental Change on Bolivia's Tropical Frontier, 1952 to the Present Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2020. Pp. 342. ISBN 978-1-4696-5609-0. $99.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Leo Chu - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):124-126.
  59.  11
    Philippe Fontaine and Jefferson D. Pooley, Society on the Edge: Social Science and Public Policy in the Postwar United States Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020. Pp. 280. ISBN 978-1-1084-8713-9. £74.99 (hardback). ISBN 978-1-1087-3219-2. £26.99 (paperback). [REVIEW]Theo Di Castri - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):132-134.
  60.  8
    Kevin McCain and Kostas Kampourakis: What Is Scientific Knowledge? An Introduction to Contemporary Epistemology of Science London: Routledge, 2019. Pp. 328. ISBN 978-1-1385-7015-3. £36.99 (paperback). [REVIEW]Andrea Durlo - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):131-132.
  61.  9
    Colouring flowers: books, art, and experiment in the household of Margery and Henry Power.Christoffer Basse Eriksen & Xinyi Wen - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):21-43.
    This article examines the early modern household's importance for producing experimental knowledge through an examination of the Halifax household of Margery and Henry Power. While Henry Power has been studied as a natural philosopher within the male-dominated intellectual circles of Cambridge and London, the epistemic labour of his wife, Margery Power, has hitherto been overlooked. From the 1650s, this couple worked in tandem to enhance their understanding of the vegetable world through various paper technologies, from books, paper slips and recipe (...)
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  62.  3
    Stratifying seamanship: sailors’ knowledge and the mechanical arts in eighteenth-century Britain.Elin Jones - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):45-63.
    A new genre of treatises on practical seamanship emerged in eighteenth-century Britain. Authored by a group of seamen with decades of experience on the lower deck of merchant and naval vessels, these texts represented the ship as a machine, and seamanship as a form of mechanical experiment which could only be carried out by deep-sea sailors. However, as this article finds, this group of sailor–authors had only a brief moment of authoritative legitimacy before their ideas were repackaged and promoted by (...)
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  63.  5
    Commercial television and primate ethology: facial expressions between Granada and London Zoo.Miles Kempton - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):83-102.
    This article examines the significant relationship that existed between commercial British television and the study of animal behaviour. Ethological research provided important content for the new television channel, at the same time as that coverage played a substantial role in creating a new research specialism, the study of primate facial expressions, for this emergent scientific discipline. The key site in this was a television and film unit at London Zoo administered by the Zoological Society and Granada TV. The Granada unit (...)
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  64.  11
    Gordon Barrett, China's Cold War Science Diplomacy Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2022. Pp. 300. ISBN 978-1-1088-4457-4. £75.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]John Krige - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):119-121.
  65.  6
    Dylan Mulvin, Proxies: The Cultural Work of Standing In London: MIT Press, 2021. Pp. 228. ISBN 978-0-2620-4514-8. £40.00 (paperback). [REVIEW]Harry Law - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):115-117.
  66.  8
    Antonio Stoppani's ‘Anthropozoic’ in the context of the Anthropocene.Eugenio Luciano & Elena Zanoni - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):103-114.
    The figure of Antonio Stoppani (1824–91), an Italian priest, geologist and patriot, has re-emerged in the last decade thanks to discussions gravitating around the ‘Anthropocene’ – a term used to designate a proposed geological time unit defined and characterized by the mark left by anthropogenic activities on geological records. Among these discussions, Stoppani is often considered a precursor for popularizing the term ‘Anthropozoic’, which he used to describe and characterize the latest ‘era’ of Earth's geological time. His writings, largely unknown (...)
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  67.  6
    Nanna Katrine Lüders Kaalund, Explorations in the Icy North: How Travel Narratives Shaped Arctic Science in the Nineteenth Century Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021. Pp. 230. ISBN 978-0-8229-4659-5. $40.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Daniella McCahey - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):123-124.
  68.  6
    Anti-voluntarism, natural providence and miracles in Thomas Burnet's Theory of the Earth.Thomas Rossetter - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):1-20.
    In his Telluris Theoria Sacra and its English translation The Theory of the Earth (1681–90), the English clergyman and schoolmaster Thomas Burnet (c.1635–1715) constructed a geological history from the Creation to the Final Consummation, positing predominantly natural causes to explain biblical events and their effects on the Earth and life on it. Burnet's insistence on appealing primarily to natural rather than miraculous causes has been interpreted both by his contemporaries and by some historians as an essentially Cartesian principle. On this (...)
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  69.  3
    Felix Lüttge, Auf den Spuren des Wals: Geographien des Lebens im 19. Jahrhundert Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2020. Pp. 279. ISBN 978-3-8353-3680-3. €28.00 (hardback). [REVIEW]Alexander Stoeger - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):129-131.
  70.  11
    Lydia Barnett, After the Flood: Imagining the Global Environment in Early Modern Europe Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019. Pp. 264. ISBN 978-1-4214-2951-9. $52.00 (hardback). ISBN 978-1-4214-4527-4. $28.95 (paperback). [REVIEW]Alexander van Dijk - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):121-123.
  71.  6
    Trais Pearson, Sovereign Necropolis: The Politics of Death in Semi-colonial Siam Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2020. Pp. 233. ISBN 978-1-5017-4015-2. $49.95 (hardback). [REVIEW]Thomas P. Weber - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (1):126-128.
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