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  1.  54
    Wittgenstein, Guilt And Western Buddhism.Robert Vinten - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (2):284-303.
    Whereas Christians often give guilt a prominent role, Buddhists are encouraged not to dwell on feelings of guilt. Leading members of the Triratna organisation – Sangharakshita, Subhuti and Subhadramati – characterise guilt as a negative emotion that hinders spiritual growth. However, if we carefully examine the concept of guilt in the manner of Wittgenstein we find that the accounts of guilt given by leading members of Triratna mischaracterise it and so ignore its positive aspects. They should acknowledge the valuable role (...)
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  2.  5
    A Retrospective Snapshot of American Zen in 1973.Helen J. Baroni - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):304-327.
    ABSTRACT In the early 1970s, Zen in the United States remained a fledgling new religious movement, characterised by small, informal meditation groups or living room sanghas, and only a handful of larger practice centres in major metropolitan areas. Existing groups were experimenting, tentatively exploring possibilities to adapt Zen for an American context; groups’ continued survival was precarious. In retrospect, the American Zen movement was actually on the cusp of four decades of dramatic growth and change. This paper analyses data preserved (...)
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  3.  1
    Reducing Suffering During Conflict: The Interface Between Buddhism And International Humanitarian Law.Andrew Bartles-Smith, Kate Crosby, Peter Harvey, P. D. Premasiri, Asanga Tilakaratne, Daniel Ratheiser, Mahinda Deegalle, Noel Maurer Trew, Stefania Travagnin & Elizabeth Harris - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):369-435.
    ABSTRACT This article stems from a project launched by the International Committee of the Red Cross in 2017 to examine the degree to which Buddhism might complement or enhance international humanitarian law, also known as ‘the law of war’ or ‘the law of armed conflict’. Given that Buddhist teachings discourage violence, scholarship has critiqued Buddhists’ involvement in armed conflict rather than considered how Buddhism might contribute to regulating the conduct of hostilities once war has broken out. Yet the Buddhist aim (...)
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  4.  3
    Two Gates Into Jane Hirshfield’s Poetry.Deirdre C. Byrne & Garth Mason - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):328-350.
    ABSTRACT Despite Jane Hirshfield’s having published 11 books of poetry and having received six awards for poetry, there is a dearth of published criticism on her work. Most of the existing literature consists of online tributes and interviews with the poet, with barely any scholarly consideration. In light of this academic lacuna, we offer a two-fold framework for reading and exploring her poetry. Our foci are the expression of Zen Buddhism and feminist concerns in her poetry. These two themes, although (...)
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  5.  5
    American Buddhist Protection of Stones in Terms of Climate Change on Mars and Earth.Daniel Capper - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):149-169.
    ABSTRACT A number of scientific writers have proposed manipulating the ecology of Mars in order to make the planet more comfortable for future immigrants from Earth. However, the ethical acceptability of such ‘terraforming’ proposals remains unresolved. In response, in this article I explore some of these scientific proposals through the lens provided by Buddhist environmental ethics that are quantitatively expressed by practitioners in the ethnographic field of the United States. What I find is that contemporary Buddhists combine philosophical notions of (...)
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  6. The Grand Maitreya Project of Mongolia: A Colossal Statue-Cum-Stupa for a Happy Future of ‘Loving ♡Kindness’.Isabelle Charleux - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):73-132.
    ABSTRACT This paper questions the current construction of a 54 metres statue of Maitreya against a 108 metres stupa in the steppe south of Ulaanbaatar, that will stand at the edge of a new ‘eco-city,’ Maidar City. The Grand Maitreya Project was initiated in 2009 by H. Battulga, businessman and MP. The project aims to be ‘one of the largest Buddhist complex in the world,’ and now is a ‘National project for reviving traditional Buddhist education and culture.’ I propose to (...)
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  7.  2
    Transnational Buddhism and Ritual Performance in Taiwan.Wei-Yi Cheng - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):51-72.
    ABSTRACT This paper will compare the ritual performance in two transnational Buddhist organizations in contemporary Taiwan in attempt to investigate the influencing factors in shaping transnational Buddhism. The traditions of both Buddhist organizations studied in this paper are foreign in Taiwan: one is of Sri Lankan Theravada tradition and the other is of Vietnamese Mahayana tradition. The ritual performance chosen for the discussion is commonly translated into English as “Ghost Festival”, though as to be shown later, the translation is somehow (...)
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  8.  6
    Diaspora’s Dharma: Buddhist Connections Across the South China Sea,1900–1949.Jack Meng-Tat Chia - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):33-50.
    ABSTRACT The restoration of Nanputuo Monastery in Xiamen and the revival of its South China Sea Buddhist networks in recent decades are significant factors in the religious resurgence in southeast China since the reform and open-door period. This article looks at an earlier role of such networks in this region, using Nanputuo Monastery as a case study, to explore the transregional Buddhist connections between southeast China and the Chinese diaspora from the turn of the twentieth century to 1949. It argues (...)
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  9. Coping with the Quarter-Life Crisis the Buddhist Way in the Czech Republic.Mgr Jitka Cirklová - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):222-240.
    ABSTRACT The article examines the phenomenon known as the quarter-life crisis. The aim was to explore how young people in the Czech Republic practising Buddhism experience this crisis and how Buddhism influences the way they cope. Qualitative research was used to gain insight into how respondents experience this life phase and whether they perceive the world of too many opportunities as a challenge or a problem. The relationship with consumer culture and material consumption was discussed along with the practice of (...)
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  10.  1
    Dependent Origination as Emergence of the Subject – A Cognitive-Psychological Approach.Gabriel Ellis - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):263-283.
    ABSTRACT Dependent Origination is one of the fundamental concepts of early Buddhism. Traditionally, it is interpreted as a description of saṃsāra, the cycle of rebirth. This article offers a psychological interpretation of Dependent Origination as a model that describes how the forming unconscious of the foetus develops into the self-conscious mind of the adult human. This perspective opens new possibilities for the integration of Buddhist mind development, cognitive psychology and psychotherapy.
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  11.  1
    Seeking Sakyamuni: South Asia in the Formation of Modern Japanese Buddhism: By Richard M.Jaffe. Chicago and London, University of Chicago Press, 2019. 320pp., Pbk. $32.50, ISBN: 978-0-226-39115-1; Ebook $31.99, ISBN: 978-0-226-62823-3.Bhadrajee S. Hewage - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):446-448.
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  12. Seeking Sakyamuni: South Asia in the Formation of Modern Japanese Buddhism: By Richard M.Jaffe. Chicago and London, University of Chicago Press, 2019. 320pp., Pbk. $32.50, ISBN: 978-0-226-39115-1; Ebook $31.99, ISBN: 978-0-226-62823-3. [REVIEW]Bhadrajee S. Hewage - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):446-448.
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  13. Rescued From the Nation: Anagarika Dharmapala and the Buddhist World: (Buddhism and Modernity Series), by Steven Kemper, Chicago and London, University of Chicago Press, 2015, X + 503 Pp. (Cloth), ISBN: 978-0-226-19907-8. [REVIEW]Yuanjing Huang - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):443-445.
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  14.  3
    Introduction to a Buddhist Counselling Technique Based on Early Buddhist Teachings: Mind Moment Analysis.Kin Cheung Lee - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):241-262.
    ABSTRACT ‘Mind moment analysis’ is a professional counselling technique rooted in early Buddhist teachings. Employing the process of cognition discussed in Madhupiṇḍika Sutta as its theoretical foundation, mind moment analysis takes form in seven iterative steps for the therapeutic practitioner to help clients deconstruct disturbing mental phenomena, detach from mental turbulence and discern wholesome and unwholesome mind acts. After cultivating stability and clarity of mind, practitioners collaborate with clients to investigate the root causes of craving beneath conceptual proliferations and mindfully (...)
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  15.  4
    Changing the Subject: Looping Effects and Subject Transformation Matrices in Two Meditation Apps.Ivan Mayerhofer - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):201-221.
    ABSTRACT The study of digital religion is currently in its fourth wave of research, focusing closely on the interrelation between users and digital religious technologies. In the fields of philosophy, cognitive science and cultural studies, looping effects, or the dynamic process of subject formation as a result of the development and internalisation of new categorisation schemes, have been investigated independently of the development of digital religious technologies. I bring these separate areas of investigation together to understand the way users are (...)
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  16.  2
    Prescribing the Dharma: Psychotherapists, Buddhist Traditions, and Defining Religion: By Ira Helderman, Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 2019, 328 Pp., Pbk. $29.95, ISBN: 978-1-4696-4852-1.Dat Manh Nguyen - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):448-452.
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  17. Prescribing the Dharma: Psychotherapists, Buddhist Traditions, and Defining Religion: By Ira Helderman, Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 2019, 328 Pp., Pbk. $29.95, ISBN: 978-1-4696-4852-1. [REVIEW]Dat Manh Nguyen - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):448-452.
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  18.  1
    Taking a Mindful Run with Murakami: A (Hermeneutic) Phenomenological Approach.Håkan Nilsson - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):351-368.
    ABSTRACT Long-distance running is an intra-subjective activity that orients the individual towards his/her own experiences and struggle for achievement within both the narrow context of training and competition and the broader context of life itself. This article takes a hermeneutic phenomenological approach to the obstacles and opportunities entailed in running; within this framework, mindfulness training will be prominently featured. These practices have been shown to strengthen the mind–body connection, increase situational awareness and enhance psychophysical well-being. The aim here is to (...)
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  19.  1
    Buddhist “Solutions” and Action in the Context of COVID-19, East and West: Complexity, Paradoxes, and Ambivalences.Lionel Obadia - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):170-189.
    ABSTRACT This paper aims to understand the complex and ambivalent relationships that globalized Buddhism between Asia and the West has with the COVID-19 pandemic, both in terms of Buddhism’s adaptation of practices to the pandemic and its representational position in society. Buddhism is not the most renowned religion in the media for its interpretation of the causes of the pandemic, nor is it the one that has epitomized the most original adaptations, particularly digital ones, of religions in a context of (...)
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  20. Attracting the Heart: Social Relations and the Aesthetics of Emotion in Sri Lankan Monastic Culture: Jeffrey Samuels, Topics in Contemporary Buddhism. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, 2010, 167 Pp., $36.00 (Hbk), ISBN-13: 978-0824833855. [REVIEW]Olivia Porter - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):436-438.
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  21. The Irish Buddhist: The Forgotten Monk Who Faced Down the British Empire: By Alicia Marie Turner, Laurence Cox, and Brian Bocking, New York, NY, Oxford University Press, 2020, ISBN: 978-0190073084 Pages: Xi- 320 Hardback: £25.99. [REVIEW]Olivia Porter - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):440-443.
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  22.  5
    The Buddha in Bronkhorstspruit: The Transnational Spread of the Taiwanese Buddhist Order Fo Guang Shan to South Africa.Jens Reinke - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):15-32.
    ABSTRACT Based on ethnographic fieldwork, this article discusses how the Fo Guang Shan Nan Hua Temple in South Africa constitutes a transnational religious space linking a ‘Global China’ and the dynamic interplay of its constituent parts with the South African host society. It does so by looking at the complex processes of Chinese migration and diaspora building that generate the conditions for Fo Guang Shan’s developmental trajectory in South Africa, but also takes into consideration how Fo Guang Shan’s renjian Buddhism, (...)
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  23.  3
    A Chinese Buddhist Ecological Narrative: From the Pure Land to the “Beautiful Country” of Xi Jinping.María Elvira Ríos Peñafiel - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):133-148.
    ABSTRACT The practice of adapting discourse to cultural and political circumstances is a recurring theme in Buddhist history in China. Today, as for all the religious institutions in China, Buddhism must respond to Chinese government ideology, including the official call to improve environmental conditions in the country. The Chinese Buddhist Association takes its discourse from the ecological adaptation or interpretation of Buddhist modernism, especially from “Humanistic Buddhism,” and also incorporates political rhetoric. As Buddhism is one of the most influential and (...)
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  24.  3
    Organ Transplants and the Medicalisation of Death: Dilemmas for Tibetan Buddhists.Malcolm Voyce - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):190-200.
    ABSTRACT This article deals with the Buddhist approach to death and the dilemmas facing Buddhists as regards the donation of their bodies after death. In particular, the article outlines the importance of the death process in providing an opportunity for transformation and Enlightenment. Firstly, the article deals with the issue of how bodies are procured for transplantation. This section notes the importance of the ‘brain death’ approach and the consequential issues surrounding the procurement of bodies that may arguably not be (...)
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