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  1. The Haunting Temporalities of Transplantation.Donna McCormack - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (2):58-82.
    This article examines the temporality of organ transplantation with a focus on memoirs where the recipient has received an organ from a deceased donor. I argue that death constitutes life. That is, this absent presence – that the organ is materially present but the person is dead and therefore absent – is the foundation for rethinking relationality as constituted through the haunting presence of those who remain central to the continuity of life but who are not alive in any strict (...)
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  2. Dancing with and Within the Digital Domain.Kriss Ravetto-Biagioli - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (2):3-31.
    Digital cameras and motion capture technologies that document and share creative practices have transformed the way we think about dance as an embodied knowledge as well as the way we experience it bodily. Computational media, which not only records and archives but also calculates, analyses and models dance, further complicates its ontological status. This move to document and inscribe dance in a tangible medium marks a shift from understanding dance as an ungraspable event towards conceiving of dance as a tangible (...)
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  3. Recombinant DNA and Genome-Editing Technologies: Embodied Utopias and Heterotopias.Eva Šlesingerová - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (2):32-57.
    Recombinant DNA technology is an essential area of life engineering. The main aim of research in this field is to experimentally explore the possibilities of repairing damaged human DNA, healing or enhancing future human bodies. Based on ethnographic research in a Czech biochemical laboratory, the article explores biotechnological corporealities and their specific ontology through dealings with bio-objects, the bodywork of scientists. Using the complementary concepts of utopia and heterotopia, the text addresses the situation of bodies and bio-objects in a laboratory. (...)
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  4. Animal, Body, Data: Starling Murmurations and the Dynamic of Becoming In-Formation.Mickey Vallee - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (2):83-106.
    The aim of this article is to demonstrate that data modelling is becoming a crucial, if not dominant, vector for our understanding of animal populations and is consequential for how we study the affective relations between individual bodies and the communities to which they belong. It takes up the relationship between animal, body and data, following the datafication of starling murmurations, to explore the topological relationships between nature, culture and science. The case study thus embodies a data journey, invoking the (...)
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  5. Disposalscapes: ‘Estranged’ Limbs After Amputation.Esmée Hanna - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (1):27-59.
    The disposal of limbs remains absent from our understandings of amputation, with ‘estranged limbs’ occupying a liminal position. Despite acceptance that the appropriate disposal of human tissue matters on moral, ethical and legal grounds, limbs and their disposal is estranged from these discourses, mirroring the experience of the limbs themselves. This article then examines this absence around disposal, considering both the options which exist for the disposal of limbs after amputation, as well as why disposal itself remains sidelined from our (...)
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  6. Carrying as Method: Listening to Bodies as Archives.Nirmal Puwar - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (1):3-26.
    This article unpacks the notion of ‘carrying’ as an embodied set of influences that bear upon our research practices and journeys. It is widely recognised that we acquire and carry a body of books as intellectual companionship. It is not however readily acknowledged how we as researchers carry sounds, aesthetics, traumas and obsessions, which stay with us and take time to appear before us, as methodological projects within our grasp. Researchers are carriers embarked on exchanges in a double sense. Firstly, (...)
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    The (De)Materialization of Criminal Bodies in Forensic DNA Phenotyping.Filipa Queirós, Helena Machado & Rafaela Granja - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (1):60-84.
    Forensic DNA phenotyping is a genetic technology that might be used in criminal investigations. Based on DNA samples of the human body found at crime scenes, it allows to infer externally visible characteristics and continental-based biogeographical ancestry. By indicating the probable visible appearance of a criminal suspect, forensic DNA phenotyping allows to narrow down the focus of a criminal investigation. In this article, drawing on interviews with forensic geneticists, we explore how their narratives translate contemporary focus on criminal molecularized bodies. (...)
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  8. What More Do Bodies Know? Moving with the Gendered Affects of Place.E. J. Renold & Gabrielle Ivinson - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (1):85-112.
    This article focuses on what bodies know yet which cannot be expressed verbally. We started with a problem encountered during conventional interviewing in an ex-mining community in south Wales when some teen girls struggled to speak. This led us to focus on the body, corporeality and movement in improvisational dance workshops. By slowing down and speeding up video footage from the workshops, we notice movement patterns and speculate about how traces of gender body-movement practices developed within mining communities over time (...)
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