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  1.  15
    Shame and the Sports Fan.Alfred Archer & Benjamin Matheson - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):208-223.
    ABSTRACTSports fans sometimes feel shame for their team’s moral transgressions. In this paper, we investigate this phenomenon. We offer an account of sports fan shame in terms of collective shame. We argue that this account is superior to accounts of sports fan shame in terms of shame for others and shame for oneself. We then argue that accepting the role that sports stars play in bringing about the collective shame amongst their fans provides a new way of justifying the claim (...)
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  2.  2
    Talent Development, Existential Philosophy and Sport: On Becoming an Elite Athlete.Andy Borrie - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):292-295.
    Volume 46, Issue 2, July 2019, Page 292-295.
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  3.  13
    Suffering in Sport: Why People Willingly Embrace Negative Emotional Experiences.Michael S. Brady - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):115-128.
    ABSTRACTNearly everyone agrees that physical pain is bad. Indeed, if anything merits the status of a platitude in our everyday thinking about value, the idea that pain is bad surely does. Equally, it seems clearly true that emotional suffering – despair, loneliness, grief, disappointment, guilt, shame, lovesickness, and the like – are all bad as well. We are strongly inclined to pity and feel sorry for those who suffer emotionally in these ways; we are motivated, at least some of the (...)
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  4.  9
    The Interplay Between Resentment, Motivation, and Performance.Myisha Cherry - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):147-161.
    ABSTRACTWhile anger in sports has been explored in philosophy, the phenomenon known as having a ‘chipped shoulder’ has not. In this paper I explore the nature, causes, and effects of playing with a ‘chip on your shoulder’ in order to highlight the interplay between resentment, motivation, and performance. CSP, on my account, involves a lasting grudge, controlled anger, and desire for non-moral payback at being overlooked, slighted, or underestimated in sports presently or at one point in one’s career. I argue (...)
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  5. Sport and the Anxious Mind.Jeffrey Fry - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):177-190.
    ABSTRACTSport is the locus of varieties of athletic experience. In this paper, I focus on anxiety as a felt experience in sport. Anxiety is often experienced as a form of psychological distress. It is a common experience and one that is arguably a frequent companion of sports participants. By exploring the underlying nature of anxiety, we may gain a better purchase on both why anxiety occurs in sports participation, and what contours it takes. I posit that the experience of anxiety (...)
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  6.  1
    All Caught Up in the Kayfabe: Understanding and Appreciating Pro-Wrestling.Lisa Jones - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):276-291.
    ABSTRACTProfessional wrestling is a popular, global, performance phenomenon that is in many respects sport-like, but tends to be shunned by serious sports fans for its alleged ‘fakeness’. Yet its own fans often behave exactly like regular sports fans: getting caught up in the action, responding emotionally to the performances, and engaging in critical analysis of the competitive strategies and the turns of events. How does this alleged ‘fake sport’ engender such complex and deeply emotional appreciation? Here I provide an analysis (...)
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  7.  7
    Do You Really Hate Tom Brady? Pretense and Emotion in Sport.Joseph G. Moore - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):244-260.
    ABSTRACTAs sports fans, we often experience what seem to be strong garden-variety emotions—everything from joy and euphoria to anger, dread and despair. In self-description, in physiology and even in phenomenology, these reactions to sporting events present themselves as genuine emotions. But we don’t act on these ‘sporting emotions’ in the ways one might expect. This is because these reactions are not genuine emotions. Or so I argue. Johan Huizinga suggested that play has a pretend ‘set aside’ ‘extra-ordinary’ character. And Kendall (...)
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  8.  1
    Ethics in Sport.Dale Murray - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):296-300.
    Volume 46, Issue 2, July 2019, Page 296-300.
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  9.  3
    Shame in Sport.Emily S. T. Ryall - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):129-146.
    ABSTRACTTo date, there has been little philosophical consideration of the concept of shame in sport, yet sport seems to be an environment conducive to the experience of shame due to its public and unequivocal nature demonstrating failure and success. Whilst much of the philosophical commentary of shame in sport suggests it acts as a quasi-virtue that holds the spirit of sport together and prevents cheating and other bad behaviour, I will argue that the real experience of shame is an adverse (...)
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  10.  4
    Emotional Sharing in Football Audiences.Gerhard Thonhauser & Michael Wetzels - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):224-243.
    ABSTRACTThe negative aim of this paper is to identify shortcomings in received theories. First, we criticize approaching audiences, and large gatherings more general, in categories revolving around the notion of the crowd. Second, we show how leading paradigms in emotion research restrict research on the social-relational dynamics of emotions by reducing them to physiological processes like emotional contagion or to cognitive processes like social appraisal. Our positive aim is to offer an alternative proposal for conceptualizing emotional dynamics in audiences. First, (...)
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  11.  9
    Only a Game? Player Misery Across Game Boundaries.Nele Van de Mosselaer - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):191-207.
    ABSTRACTVideogames often confront players with frustratingly difficult challenges, fearsome enemies, and tragic stories. As such, they can evoke feelings of failure, sadness, anger, and fear. Although these feelings are usually regarded as undesirable, many players seem to enjoy videogames which cause them. In this paper, I argue that player misery often originates from a fictional or lusory attitude which brackets game events from real-life, making the player’s emotions solely relevant within the game context. As they are part of the game (...)
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  12.  8
    Don’T Stop Make-Believing.Nathan Wildman - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):261-275.
    ABSTRACTHow is it that we can rationally assert that sport outcomes do not really matter, while also seeming to care about them to an absurd degree? This is the so-called puzzle of sport. The broadly Waltonian solution to the puzzle has it that we make-believe the outcomes matter. Recently, Stear has critiqued this Waltonian solution, raising a series of five objections. He has also leveraged these objections to motive his own contextualist solution to the puzzle. The aim of this paper (...)
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  13.  12
    Agent-Regret and Sporting Glory.Jake Wojtowicz - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):162-176.
    ABSTRACTWhen sporting agents fail through wrongful or faulty behaviour, they should feel guilty; when they fail because of a deficiency in their abilities, they should feel shame. But sometimes we fail without being deficient and without being at fault. I illustrate this with two examples of players, Moacir Barbosa and Roberto Baggio, who failed in World Cup finals and cost their teams the greatest prize in sport. Although both players failed, I suggest that neither was at fault and neither was (...)
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  14.  6
    What Would a Deep Ecological Sport Look Like? The Example of Arne Naess.Gunnar Breivik - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (1):63-81.
    ABSTRACTSince the 1960s environmental problems have increasingly been on the agenda in Western countries. Global warming and climate change have increased concerns among scientists, politicians and the general population. While both elite sport and mass sport are part of the consumer culture that leads to ecological problems, sport philosophers, with few exceptions, have not discussed what an ecologically acceptable sport would look like. My goal in this article is to present a radical model of ecological sport based on Arne Naess’s (...)
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  15.  7
    Being and Feeling Addicted to Exercise: Reflections From a Neophenomenological Perspective.Robert Gugutzer - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (1):30-48.
    ABSTRACTSince its emergence during the 1970s, scientific research on exercise addiction has been interested primarily in the mental and physical causes and consequences of the behaviour of exercise addicts. This focus can be ascribed to the dominance of psychology and medicine among this field of research. This paper wishes to contribute to these thematic priorities and basic approaches by taking a phenomenological perspective as a basis, thus making the embodied and the personal dimension of exercise addiction the centre of attention. (...)
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  16.  4
    Judging Athletes’ Moral Actions: Some Critical Reflections.Carwyn Jones - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (1):1-13.
    ABSTRACTApproving or disapproving of athletes’ moral conduct and character is commonplace. In this essay I explore to what extent such judgements are valid and reliable moral judgements. I identify some methodological problems associated with making moral judgements particularly, but not exclusively, from a virtue perspective. I argue that we have no reliable access to states of mind needed to make informed evaluations. Moreover, even if such access was available, the validity of our judgements would be compromised or limited by our (...)
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  17.  5
    Conventionalism Defended: A Reply to Moore.William Morgan - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (1):98-107.
    ABSTRACTIn a recent article in this Journal, Eric Moore criticized an earlier essay of mine published in this same Journal on two fronts. On the first, he criticized my criticisms of broad internalism for relying on abstract moral principles too far removed from the practice of sport to adjudicate normative conflicts in which disputants cannot agree on what is the purpose of sport. On the second front, he criticized my reliance on what he called Rorty’s “controversial” views of truth and (...)
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  18.  5
    Action Theory and the Value of Sport.Jon Pike - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (1):14-29.
    ABSTRACTI present a corrective to the formalist and conventionalist down-playing of physical actions in the understanding of the value of sport. I give a necessarily brief account of the Causal Theory of Action and its implications for the normativity of actions. I show that the CTA has limitations, particularly in the case of failed or incomplete actions, and I show that failed or incomplete actions are constitutive of sport. This allows me to open up the space for another model, drawn (...)
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  19.  6
    The Cybathlon Experience: Beyond Transhumanism to Capability Hybridization.Remi Richard & Bernard Andrieu - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (1):49-62.
    ABSTRACTThe Cybathlon is a new kind of competition that embraces disabled people who use advanced assistive technologies. The purpose of this essay is to interpret the Cybathlon not as a ‘transhuman’ sport for enhanced athletes but as a place for experimenting with ‘capability hybridatization’ of the self. We wish to show that the figure of the transhuman cyborg that dominates the media coverage of disabled athletes is an attempt to approximate the able-bodied standard. This figure is problematic because it excludes (...)
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  20.  5
    Phenomenology in the Bleachers: Heidegger and the Truth of Sport.Jason M. Smith - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (1):82-97.
    ABSTRACTPhenomenologies of sport predominantly focus on an analysis of the experience of participating in sport, either as a part of a team or individually. In this essay, the author argues that a vital avenue for the phenomenology of sport has not been adequately explored, that is, an analysis of the experience of the spectator. Taking up Heidegger’s phenomenological method as outlined in Being and Time, the author argues that Heidegger’s notions of the they-self, idle talk, and falling prey offer critical (...)
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