19 found

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  1.  17
    Somaesthetics and Sport (review). [REVIEW]Botond Csuka - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (2):300-304.
    Somaesthetics and Sport (ed. Andrew Edgar, Brill, 2022) is a multifaceted collection of essays: Richard Shusterman’s theoretical framework is robust enough to lend unity to the volume, but it mostly functions as a springboard for the individual papers, never suffocating their theoretical explorations or making the book repetitive or a boring read. The ten essays also communicate with one another through certain recurring notions such as agency, somatic awareness, the Suitsian account of games or the interdisciplinary intertwining of philosophical arguments (...)
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  2.  9
    Deleuze and sport: towards a general athleticism of thought.Jonnie Eriksson & Kalle Jonasson - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (2):159-174.
    The French philosopher Gilles Deleuze repeatedly referred to a wide range of sports and games throughout his career. This article assembles a comprehensive view of the philosophy of sport seen from Deleuze’s perspective. By studying the development of how he discussed different sports and games, and by pinpointing the concepts he constructed with reference to them, the article attests to the merits of a Deleuzian philosophy of sports. His term athleticism is utilised as a node to overview his allusions to (...)
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  3.  5
    Risky rescues revisited.Patrick Findler - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (2):247-255.
    This essay replies to Phillip Reichling’s recent article in this journal defending a principle of rescue I proposed, but rejected, in my paper, ‘Climbing high and letting die’ (2021). I argued that ‘the comparable risk principle’ imposes unreasonable demands on adventure sport athletes, for it implies that because they assume substantial risks for sport, they have duties to assume comparable risks to rescue others – duties that would otherwise be supererogatory precisely because of the risks involved. Reichling (2022) defends the (...)
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  4.  5
    Is bodybuilding a sport?Adrian Kind & Eric R. Helms - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (2):281-299.
    Since its beginnings, modern bodybuilding has been accompanied by the background issue of whether it should be considered a sport. The problem, culminating in its provisional acceptance as a sport by the International Olympic Committee, was later retracted. The uncertainty of whether bodybuilding is a sport or not seems to linger. Addressing this issue, Aranyosi (2018) provided an account to determine the status of bodybuilding as a sport that arrives at the negative answer: bodybuilding is not a sport but rather (...)
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  5.  4
    Husserl’s three-part model for intentionality: an examination of players, play acts, and playgrounds.R. Scott Kretchmar - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (2):229-246.
    In this analysis, I employ Husserl’s three-part description of intentionality to show how a player/play act/play object model for consciousness helps us see play more clearly. I review Suits’ logic-based attempts to amend Huizinga’s overly inclusive characterization of play. However, I do so on what I see as stronger phenomenological grounds by describing four kinds of experience embedded in Suits’ work-play dichotomy. I analyze two species of play-fortified work – namely, work that requires intrinsic enhancement and work that does not. (...)
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  6.  13
    Return of the Grasshopper: Games, Leisure and the Good Life in the Third Millennium. [REVIEW]Lukáš Mareš - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (2):304-309.
    Bernard Suits is without a doubt one of the most influential scholars in the philosophy of sport. His book The Grasshopper: Games, Life and Utopia (first published in 1978) is a classic and ‘must r...
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  7.  7
    Esports, real sports and the Olympic Virtual Series.Jim Parry & Jacob Giesbrecht - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (2):208-228.
    Despite reservations over the status of esports as sports, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has, for policy reasons, encouraged International Federations to pursue links with providers of ‘virtual and simulated’ sports, in part by the introduction of an event, the Olympic Virtual Series, first held in 2021. In providing an account of ‘virtuality’ and ‘simulation’, we query the theoretical basis of the Olympic Virtual Series. In particular, we query the IOC’s use of the term ‘virtual’ in the description of two (...)
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  8.  7
    A Confucian mutualist theory of sport.Alexander Pho - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (2):256-280.
    This article develops a novel theory of sport that I call ‘Confucian mutualism’. Confucian mutualism is underpinned by the Confucian Golden Rule and the Confucian conception of human dignity. It resembles the mutualist theory of sport developed by Robert L. Simon in maintaining that sport participants ethically ought to prioritize promoting sporting excellence both in themselves and in their co-participants. However, while Simon’s mutualism maintains that sporting excellence consists in proficiency at sport constitutive skills, Confucian mutualism maintains that sporting excellence (...)
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  9.  4
    Epistemological and cognitive aspects of the phenomenon of dance and corporeality.Zhanna Ramadanova & Aigul Kulbekova - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (2):175-189.
    This study explores the cognitive and corporeal aspects of choreography as a means of expressing the human subconscious. Recent interdisciplinary research, including studies of somatic intelligence and mirror neurons, suggests that dance can influence human cognitive abilities through psychosomatics. Mirror neurons allow for kinesthetic empathy, enabling dance observers to experience movements, emotions, and experiences as their own. The authors argue that dance, which engages multiple aspects of a person, is a crucial tool for educating the younger generation and should be (...)
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  10.  7
    Why privilege the Europeans? A discussion of FIFA’s rules for international transfers for under-18 players.Jørn Sønderholm - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (2):190-207.
    Many professional football clubs in Europe have youth academies. The business model of such academies is that a club invests resources in training a player and then, when the player is old enough to sign an adult contract, either sells the player or offers him an adult contract. According to Fédération Internationale De Football Association (FIFA), international transfers of players are only permitted if the player is over the age of 18. There are five exceptions to this rule. One of (...)
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  11.  21
    Suffering and Schadenfreude in sport.Sean Foley & Michael Rohlf - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (1):133-147.
    We argue that some sports test athletes’ capacities to endure specific types of suffering, and in such cases the suffering is constitutive of the sport: the sporting contest would not be a good sporting contest if that capacity were not tested. We then argue that it is morally acceptable for athletes to experience pleasure (Schadenfreude) in response to the constitutive suffering of competitors insofar as that pleasure is compatible with pity or sympathy for non-constitutive suffering. We use the case of (...)
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  12.  10
    High altitude, enhancement, and the ‘spirit of sport’.Emma C. Gordon & Connie Dodds - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (1):63-82.
    The World Anti-Doping Code (2021) includes a substance on the prohibited list if it meets at least two of the following: (1) it has the potential to enhance or enhances sport performance; (2) it represents an actual or potential health risk to the athlete; (3) it violates the spirit of sport. This paper uses a case study to illustrate points of tension between this code and enhancements that are appropriate to ban; we argue that there are banned drugs (e.g., acetazolamide (...)
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  13.  11
    MMA and the purist/partisan distinction.Jason Holt & Marc Ramsay - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (1):18-35.
    The purist/partisan distinction has dominated recent discussions of sport spectatorship and sport aesthetics. The focus of such discussions, however, has been sport in general or, often implicitly, team sports in particular. Here, using mixed martial arts (MMA) as a case study, we argue that specific aspects of the sport in question can significantly affect how the purist/partisan distinction plays out for viewers. MMA’s status as an individual combat sport mitigates, in illuminating ways, the partisanship displayed so prominently among fans of (...)
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  14.  10
    A functional analysis of cheating and corruption in sports.Sinclair A. MacRae - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (1):116-132.
    My main goal here is to develop a functional analysis of cheating and corruption in sports, and to differentiate cheating within the broader category of corruption. Whereas officials can act corruptly, they cannot cheat. In contrast, sports participants, since they occupy two roles, can do both. I argue that although acts of cheating are acts of corruption, not all corrupt acts by competitors are acts of cheating. I also respond to some skeptical challenges and criticisms of the concept of ‘cheating’ (...)
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  15.  6
    In defense of religion-sport separation in coaching.Lou Matz - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (1):100-115.
    Can a coach rightfully integrate a religious orientation in their coaching in a public institution? In its recent Kennedy v Bremerton School District (2022) decision, the U.S. Supreme Court defended the educational value of players’ exposure to diverse expressive activities as a part of learning how to live in a pluralistic society. I contend that religion-sport separation is the most philosophically defensible position, based primarily on the problems with supernatural theism in religions like Christianity. Nonetheless, there is a form of (...)
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  16.  7
    How bad can good sport be?William J. Morgan - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (1):36-62.
    I argue that ethical features of sport strongly interact with aesthetic features of sport, such that all pro tanto ethical merits/defects count as aesthetic merits/defects. This is a much-debated topic in the philosophy of art and aesthetics literature, in which recent critics have taken to task this interactionist take on how ethical evaluative properties interact with aesthetic ones. The critics’ main argument against this view is that far too many works of art than theorists of this strong interactionist kind care (...)
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  17.  12
    Sport and Moral Conflict.Jon Pike - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (1):148-153.
    Bill Morgan has written a terrific book, the culmination of his career long engagement in the philosophy of sport and a work which is immediately a required read – one might say a required grapple...
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  18.  48
    Why ‘Meaningful Competition’ is not fair competition.Jon Pike - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (1):1-17.
    In this paper I discuss a new conception that has arrived relatively recently on the scene, in the context of the debate over the inclusion of transwomen (hereafter TW) in female sport. That conception is ‘Meaningful Competition’ (hereafter MC) – a term used by some of those who advocate for the inclusion of TW in female sport if and only if they reduce their testosterone levels. I will argue that MC is not fair. I understand MC as a substitute concept, (...)
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  19.  15
    A just organized youth sport.Cesar R. Torres & Francisco Javier López Frías - 2023 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 50 (1):83-99.
    Organized youth sport has become a prominent activity in Western societies, one around which myriad families structure their daily lives. Despite its popularity, or rather because of it, youth sport is besotted with complex problems. One distinctive set of problems pertains to children’s opportunities to benefit from engagement in sport. Such problems require a reflection on the conditions of justice. The goal of this paper is to explore ethical guidelines to make youth sport more just. The paper begins by characterizing (...)
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