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  1.  6
    Setting the Record Straight: A Defense of Vacating Wins in Response to Rules Violations.Seth Bordner & Chase Wrenn - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):169-185.
    ABSTRACT Sometimes, teams or players violate the rules of their leagues or associations. And sometimes, their leagues or associations respond by striking their wins from the official record. Especially in American college sports governed by the NCAA, this practice of vacating results is unpopular and widely decried. It should not be. Vacating wins can be an appropriate response to rules violations in higher-order competitions in the same way that it can be appropriate to call back a scoring play due to (...)
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  2.  1
    A Critical Note on Sporting Supererogation.Steffen Borge - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):247-261.
    Alfred Archer recently argued that there is good reason to think that sporting supererogation exists. In the present paper, I take a closer look at Archer’s two key cases from association football...
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  3. Sport, Meritocracy, and Praise.Nicholas Dixon - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):275-292.
    ABSTRACT Meritocracy, in which success depends on ability and effort, is a desirable goal for sport, even if sport does not achieve this goal perfectly. However, even in a meritocracy whether athletes deserve praise is questionable, given that a determinant of success, genetic endowments, is beyond their control. From a hard determinist perspective, even the elements of athletes’ actions that appear to be within their control—their diligence in developing their skill and strategy and their good sportsmanship—are themselves a function of (...)
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  4.  5
    Athletic Skill and the Value of Close Contests.Erin Flynn - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):186-201.
    In this paper I defend an Irreconcilability Thesis, claiming that two commonly held views about athletic contests are in fact incompatible. The first view is that athletic contests are essentially...
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  5.  4
    A Fair Shake for the Fair-Weather Fan.Kyle Fruh, Marcus Hedahl, Luke Maring & Nate Olson - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):262-274.
    ABSTRACT After initially pitting partisans against purists, the literature on the ethics of fandom has coalesced around a pluralist position: purists and partisans each have their own merits, and there is no ideal form of fandom. In this literature, however, the fair-weather fan continues to be viewed with dismissal and derision. While some fair-weather fans may earn this contempt, many fair-weather fans, we argue, are not only acceptable, they have important advantages over partisans and purists, and as such are in (...)
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  6.  6
    Spilled Milk and Burned Toast: Extrinsic Pressure and Sporting Excellence.Christopher Johnson & Jason Taylor - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):202-218.
    ABSTRACT This paper explores the dynamics of extrinsic pressure in sport and its relation to athletic excellence. We argue that psychological pressure exerted by activities extrinsic to sport can be relevant to success or failure in it, such that how one manages extrinsic pressures can transmit to failure to perform in sport and thus be a determinant to victory, with no reason to think failure mitigated by the non-sporting nature of one’s other behaviour. To make this argument we offer a (...)
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  7.  2
    The Poetics of Everyday Movement: Human Movement Ecology and Urban Walking.Sigmund Loland - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):219-234.
    ABSTRACT Departing from the hegemonic position of epidemiology in population physical activity research and policy, I argue for the significance of a complementary, holistic approach: human movement ecology. The argument is developed in two steps. In a first step, and using perspectives from body ecology and eco-philosophy, I emphasize the potential in movement of a ’dynamic and spontaneous ecologization’, which opens for the development of ecological consciousness and sustainable practice. In a second step, I test HME towards a ’hard case’: (...)
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  8. ‘Playing Sport Playfully’: On the Playful Attitude in Sport.Emily Ryall & Lukáš Mareš - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):293-306.
    ABSTRACT There has been extensive debate among various disciplines about the nature and value of play. From these discussions it seems clear that play is a phenomenon with more than just one dimension: as a specific type of activity, as a form or structure, as an ontologically distinctive phenomenon, as a type of experience, or as a stance or an attitude towards a particular activity. This article focuses on the importance of the playful attitude in sport. It begins by attempting (...)
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  9.  2
    The Influence of Daoism, Chan Buddhism, and Confucianism on the Theory and Practice of East Asian Martial Arts.Anton Sukhoverkhov, A. A. Klimenko & A. S. Tkachenko - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):235-246.
    ABSTRACT This paper discusses the impact of East Asian philosophical ideas on the origins and development of martial arts. The article argues that the ideas of Daoist philosophy were developed into ‘soft styles’ or ‘internal schools’ that are based on the doctrine of ‘wuwei’ which follows the path of Yin. These styles are in opposition to ‘external’ or ‘hard styles’ of martial arts that follow the path of Yang. Daoist philosophy of ‘ziran’ influenced ‘animal’ or ‘imitation styles’ and the paradigm (...)
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  10.  9
    Sport and Self-Love: Reflections on Boxing and the Construction of Selfhood.Wivi Andersen - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):129-145.
    This article examines whether boxing, despite – or perhaps because – its destructive potential can be an arena for the formation of selfhood. Based on Honneth’s theory of recognition, I sugg...
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  11.  4
    O Captain! My Captain!: Leadership, Virtue, and Sport.John William Devine - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):45-62.
    There is a crisis of leadership in sport. Leadership as an athletic excellence is under threat from the deepening influence of coaches on in-game decision- making. To appreciate what is being lost in this shift of responsibility, it is necessary to understand the challenge of athlete leadership. Captaincy is the quintessential on-field leadership role. However, the role of captain, and athlete leadership more widely, remains philosophically untheorized. This paper initiates a discussion of leadership in sport by providing the first normative (...)
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  12.  3
    Olympic Philosophy: The Ideas and Ideals Behind the Ancient and Modern Olympic Games: By Heather L. Reid, Sioux City, Iowa, Parnassos Press, 2020, 458 Pp., $39.99 (Paperback), ISBN 9781942495345.Daniel A. Dombrowski - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):146-153.
    This book is a collection of 26 previously published essays on ‘Olympic philosophy,’ both ancient and modern. Because the essays were published over the past 20 years in various journals and books,...
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  13.  6
    Climbing High and Letting Die.Patrick Findler - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):10-25.
    On May 15, 2006, 34 year-old mountaineer David Sharp died in a small cave a few hundred meters below the peak of Mount Everest in the aptly named “death zone”. As he lay dying, Sharp was passed by forty-plus climbers on their way to the summit, none of whom made an effort to rescue him. The climbers’ failure to rescue Sharp sparked much debate in mountaineering circles and the mainstream media, but philosophers have not yet weighed in on the issues. (...)
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  14.  2
    In Answer to Orwell: A Defence of International Sport.Brandon Robshaw - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):1-9.
    This paper first considers and rebuts George Orwell's case against international sport. He argues both from general principles and specific examples that international sporting contests lead to org...
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  15.  7
    Rethinking the Unfair Advantage Argument.Tena Thau - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):63-81.
    Athletes who flout doping bans are generally thought to have gained an unfair advantage. In this paper, I critically examine this view. I begin by defending an effort-based account of desert in spo...
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  16.  10
    The Moral Responsibilities of Fandom.George Tyler - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):111-128.
    Using American football as a point of entry, I approach harmful sports from the perspective of fans’ roles and responsibilities. Given that sports’ profitability is a significant obstacle to reform...
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