Year:

  1.  1
    Literal Bodies (Somata): A Telestich in Ovid.Julene Abad Del Vecchio - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):688-692.
    ABSTRACTThis article draws attention to the presence of a previously unnoticed transliterated telestich in the transformation of stones into bodies in the episode of Deucalion and Pyrrha in Ovid's Metamorphoses. Detection of the Greek intext, which befits the episode's amplified bilingual atmosphere, is encouraged by a number of textual cues. The article also suggests a ludic connection to Aratus’ Phaenomena.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  1
    Virgil's Callimachean Pindar: Kingship and the Baby Iamus in Eclogue 4.23–5.Zsolt Adorjáni - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):649-654.
    This article argues for an allusion in Virgil's Eclogue 4 to one of Pindar's victory odes. It will be suggested that this Pindaric pretext is viewed by the Latin poet through a Callimachean perspective which adds to it further layers of significance. Consequently, the evidence will be discussed for reading the allusion in terms of royal ideology which places Virgil's poem in the tradition of Hellenistic ruler-encomia.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Lucan's Cicero: Dismembering a Legend.Y. Baraz - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):721-740.
    This paper proposes a new synthetic account of the presence of Cicero as both character and source in Lucan's Bellum Ciuile. Lucan's treatment is derived primarily from Virgil's technique for creating intertextually complex characters, but further builds on Sallust's displacement of Cicero in his narrative of the Catilinarian conspiracy and on the declamatory practice of reducing the orator to a few prominent and recognizable traits. Cicero the character, as he briefly appears at the opening of the seventh book, is not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. ‘For Themistocles of Phrearrhioi, on Account of Honour’: Ostracism, Honour and the Nature of Athenian Politics.Matteo Barbato - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):500-519.
    This article offers a new interpretation of the Athenian institution of ostracism and explores its significance for our understanding of democratic politics. A popular scholarly trend interprets ostracism as an instrument for pursuing conflict among aristocratic politicians, in accordance with a view of Athenian democracy as dominated by a restricted elite competing for power and prestige. This article aims to reassess this picture by investigating ostracism in the light of recent studies of honour, which have stressed honour's potential for balancing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. ‘Brigands’ and ‘Tyrants’ in Josephus’ Bellvm Jvdaicvm.Steven Ben-Yishai - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):902-907.
    This article argues against the long-enduring practice of Josephan scholarship to treat the terms τύραννος and λῃστής as a collocation, or as undistinguished terms of invective employed by Josephus against various Jewish antagonists in his Bellum Judaicum. Towards this aim, the article first examines the frequency in which these two terms appear together throughout the text of the BJ, before turning to a critical examination of particular passages that feature the terms, in order to prove that they are, in fact, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  6
    Xenophon's Socrates on Wisdom and Action.Joseph Bjelde - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):560-574.
    Xenophon's Socrates, like Plato's, holds that wisdom comes with practical abilities. But influential interpretations of Xenophon's Socrates attribute to him a splintered view of wisdom, on which there is no wisdom simpliciter which is specially connected to all good actions. In this paper, I argue that a crucial text is significantly more problematic for the splintered view than hitherto appreciated, while the texts which are supposed to support the splintered view do not. But Xenophon's Socrates comes apart from Plato's in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Martial and the Doctors: Ophthalmology and Uvulectomy in Epigram 10.56.Lawrence J. Bliquez - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):907-910.
    This short note attempts to shed light on some of the surgical procedures referred to in Martial's epigram 10.56 by consulting pertinent Graeco-Roman medical texts. A fuller understanding of one such intervention supports Martial's text as transmitted.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Blindness as the Threshold Between Life and Death in Seneca's Oedipvs and Phoenissae.Ricardo Duarte - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):707-720.
    This article looks at the complexity of the thought processes that lead Seneca's Oedipus to choose the mors longa of blindness as punishment for his crime. It offers an analysis of the consolation of this existence on the threshold between life and death, notably with reference to the end of the Oedipus, but also of the sorrow of this liminal existence. The latter is described in Seneca's Phoenissae, which suggests an escape, by death stricto sensu, from the threshold represented by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Epic Voices in Statius’ Achilleid: Calchas’ Vision and Ulysses’ Plan.Francesca Econimo - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):759-776.
    This article deals with Calchas’ prophecy and Diomedes’ and Ulysses’ interventions during the mustering of the Greeks at Aulis in Statius’ Achilleid. It will be argued that Calchas and Ulysses embody two different approaches to the generic tensions of the new epic which Statius’ poem represents. Calchas, the old uates of the Homeric tradition, seems unable to fully understand the ‘poetics of illusion’ enacted by Thetis and Achilles in disguise, as is clear from his vision. His point of view is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  3
    A Misprint in the Oxford Classical Text of Plato's Phaedo.Roberto Falbo - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):886-886.
    This article reports a notable misprint in J.C.G. Strachan's Oxford Classical Text of Plato's Phaedo.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  3
    Ancestry and Family Identity in Suetonius’ Caesars.Phoebe Garrett - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):777-790.
    Suetonius’ Lives of the Caesars usually begin with a family tree. These family trees are often rhetorical, foreshadowing in the ancestors character traits that will be themes of the rest of the Life. This particular rhetorical strategy relies upon an older phenomenon of ‘family identity’—namely, the literary application of similar characteristics to people in the same family—such as the one that tells us that the Claudii are proud and the Domitii Ahenobarbi are ferocious. Gary Farney studied ‘family identity’ as a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Worms and the Man in Lucilius.Ian Goh - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):624-631.
    This piece explores possible reasons for Lucilius’ suggestive reference to worms, emblemate uermiculato, in the famous comment which has survived from Book 2 of the satirist. The fragment can be set metatextually amid other extracts of Lucilius to show the poet's agency and skill, considered as having influenced aspects of its own afterlife and appreciated in its historical context as a hit at Publius Mucius Scaevola, who died from phthiriasis.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Exemplarity and Politics of Memory: The Recovery of the Piraeus by Olympiodoros of Athens.Antonio Iacoviello - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):617-623.
    The article discusses Pausanias’ obscure statement that the early Hellenistic Athenian general Olympiodoros ‘recovered the Piraeus and Mounychia’. By understanding the feat as an episode within the wider context of the Athenian stasis of 295 between the ‘tyrant’ Lachares and Olympiodoros’ democratic resistance, the article shows that the narrative of the enterprise aimed to i) establish a parallel between Olympiodoros and the illustrious democratic recovery by Thrasyboulos, ii) rehabilitate Olympiodoros as a democratic hero after his involvement in the oligarchic years (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. ‘Day Watch’ or Baywatch? A Note on Ημεροσκοποσ.Mark Janse - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):553-559.
    This article argues that ἡμεροσκόπος at Lys. 849 constitutes a pun based on iotacism, a well-known feature of female speech in fifth-century Athens aptly illustrated by Socrates in Plato's Cratylus. By describing herself as ἡμεροσκόπος ‘day watch’ pronounced as ἱμεροσκόπος ‘lust watch’, Lysistrata perverts the military term associated with the occupation-plot to a sexually charged word associated with the strike-plot. Its use would be very appropriate in a scene in which the φαλληφόρια of the men become the subject of a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Iamblichus Apvd Simpl. Corollarivm de Tempore 794.21–7 Diels.Jeffrey M. Johns - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):849-855.
    In his commentary on the Timaeus, the Neoplatonist Iamblichus argues that time is logically antecedent to change inasmuch as time is no mere aspect of change. Naturally, scholars appraise this thesis in light of Neoplatonic metaphysics. Nevertheless, they neglect the philological framing of this thesis, and thence the philosophical implications thereof. Only J.M. Dillon acknowledges this framing, though even Dillon does not acknowledge the philosophical implications thereof. This article illustrates the logic of said thesis vis-à-vis the Iamblichean exegesis of Ti. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. A Green Sky and a Green Sun?Boris Kayachev - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):900-902.
    This article considers two passages in which either the sky or the sun is described as ‘green’; it argues that in both cases such a colour epithet is out of place and proposes to correct uiridi caelo to nitido caelo in the former case, and uiridis … Phoebus to rutilus … Phoebus in the latter.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Late Antique Afterlife of Roman Exemplarity: The Case of Scipio Nasica in Livy, Ab Vrbe Condita Book 29 and Augustine, de Civitate Dei 1.30–2.5. [REVIEW]Katherine Krauss - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):676-687.
    This article calls for a new understanding of the relationship between classicizing and Christian discourses of exemplarity through a close reading of the figure of Scipio Nasica in Livy, Ab urbe condita Book 29 and Augustine, De ciuitate Dei Books 1–2. Nasica, whose selection as a uir optimus by the Senate in 204 b.c.e. has puzzled modern scholars, was a source of historiographical difficulty for Livy that prompted him to reflect upon exemplarity, mythmaking and the tenuous relationship between past and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. On Aristotle's Peri Hermeneias 16a1–18: The Case of an Anonymous Armenian Commentary.Geneviève Lachance - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):866-885.
    The anonymous Armenian commentary was transmitted together with the Armenian translation of Aristotle's Peri Hermeneias. It was composed in the Hellenizing style and commonly associated with the figure of David the Invincible, a philosopher of the Neoplatonic School of Alexandria. This article presents a general structural analysis of the commentary followed by a comparative study and translation of its first chapter. It argues that the commentary was indeed written in the tradition of late antique Greek commentaries but was probably not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Politics and Play in the Lavs Pisonis.Max Leventhal - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):741-758.
    This article examines the first-century c.e.Laus Pisonis, an anonymous panegyric for a certain Piso that lays particular emphasis on his skill at lyre-playing, ball games and the board game, the ludus latrunculorum. Whereas this focus has often been a cause of consternation among critics, this article argues that play is a crucial element of the poem's poetic and political operations. The first section shows that the poem employs images of poetic maturity and of temporality in order to justify a light (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Nothing but Rhetoric? Rhetoric, Pragmatics and Myth-Making in the Agōn of Euripides’ Alcestis.Gunther Martin - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):538-552.
    This paper draws on Euripides’ Alcestis to propose a new way of approaching the tragic agōn. It reads the debate scene of that play not as a rhetorical showpiece but as a piece of dialogue and an interaction that follows the principles of communicative pragmatics. In this interpretation Admetus and Pheres do not aim to persuade each other about whether it would have been right for Pheres to sacrifice his life for his son; instead, father and son are engaged in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. The Beginning and End of Appian's Mithridateios.Brian McGing - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):791-798.
    This article deals with the structure of Appian's Mithridateios. All the manuscripts begin with two chapters that, in his 1785 edition of Appian, Johannes Schweighäuser argued could not represent the opening of the work: a folio had been removed from its proper place towards the end of the work and mistakenly placed at the beginning. All editors followed Schweighäuser until recently, when there has been a tendency to accept the manuscript order of chapters. This creates a very different start for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. The Eagle Basking in the Light of Fame: The Indo-European Poetic Background of Pindar, Nemean 3.80–4.Eduard Meusel - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):482-499.
    This article contributes to a discussion raised more than forty years ago in this journal by Richard Stoneman on how to interpret the unexpected image of an eagle at Pind. Nem. 3.80. Without excluding the possibility of a reference to the poet himself, this article argues, mainly based on a survey on the traditional elements used in that passage, that the eagle also refers—at least partially—to the victorious athlete Aristocleides. This is demonstrated by an internal investigation of the structure of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Shape of Early Greek Utopia.Davide Napoli - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):467-481.
    The paper offers a new approach to utopia in early and classical Greek texts from Homer to the fifth century. The model is based on four motifs regularly occurring in ‘utopian texts’, that is, descriptions of places that are distant in time and/or space. A comparative analysis of such texts and of how they manipulate the four motifs sheds new light on specific problems and encourages more nuanced readings of famous texts, such as Homer's account of Scheria.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. A Note on the Ascription of Ennius, Annales 5 Skutsch.Jason S. Nethercut - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):891-894.
    This note adduces corroborating evidence for Skutsch's ascription of Enn. Ann. 5 to a description of the water cycle in the speech of Homer in the proem to the Annales. Despite the flawed argumentation in Skutsch's presentation and despite a general reluctance among scholars to endorse his ascription, this note argues that his solution should remain part of the scholarly discussion, not least because there are aspects of Skutsch's argument that remain uncontested and because Lucretius seems to endorse this location (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The ‘Polite’ Aorist: Tense or Aspect?Arjan A. Nijk - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):520-537.
    This article investigates the semantics and pragmatics of the ‘hortative’ aorist and the ‘tragic’ or ‘performative’ aorist. Lloyd argued in 1999 that the tragic aorist is a more polite alternative for the corresponding present. Recently, he has extended this view to the hortative aorist, suggesting that, for example, τί οὐκ ἐκαλέσαμεν; is a polite alternative for τί οὐ καλοῦμεν; Lloyd argues that the politeness value of the aorist derives from its being a past tense, comparing the so-called ‘attitudinal’ past. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Some Considerations on the Attribution of the ‘New Apuleius’.Dmitry Nikolaev & Mikhail Shumilin - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):819-848.
    The ‘New Apuleius’ is a set of Latin summaries of Plato's works first published in 2016 by Justin Stover, who attributed it to Apuleius. The present article attempts to assess two key aspects of Stover's argument, viz. his reconstruction of the manuscript transmission of the new text and his use of computer-assisted stylometric techniques. The authors suggest that both strands of his argument are inconclusive. First, it is argued that the transposition of gatherings in the archetype of the Apuleian philosophica (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. The Virgilian Cento Progne Et Philomela (Anth. Lat. 13 R): Towards a Solution for a Mythological Riddle.Marie Okáčová - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):856-865.
    This paper deals with the 24-line mythological epyllion Progne et Philomela, an anonymous Virgilian cento of presumed North African origin, which is usually dated to the fourth or fifth century and is marked by considerable obscurity. The aim is to shed some light on the most intriguing parts of this elliptical retelling of the given myth, in particular the puzzling network of family relationships and the extended talking-blood metaphor. Offering a new perspective on the text, the author claims that its (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. A Note on Ciris 118.Włodzimierz Olszaniec - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):898-899.
    This note offers a new emendation in the Ciris. The author suggests that the text of line 118 should read: deicere et indomita Minoa retundere mente.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Divine Confirmation: Plato, Timaeus 55c7–D6.Federico M. Petrucci - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):886-891.
    Burnet's text at Pl. Ti. 55c7–d6 is at least questionable, and opting for a different reading at 55d5 would shed light on an intriguing argumentative aspect of Plato's cosmological account: God confirms the metaphysical reasons why there is just one perfect world.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  4
    Plato, Statesman 275d8–E1.Vasilis Politis - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):575-581.
    In his dialogue Statesman, Plato first sets out one way of thinking of the statesperson, on the model of a nurturer of a herd such as a shepherd; then he sets out a very different way of thinking of him, on the model of a weaver of a social fabric. Critics have long been wondering whether Plato wants to combine the two models or, on the contrary, to abandon the nurturing model in favour of the weaving model.This article shows that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  6
    Επιβολη Τησ Διανοιασ: Reflections on the Fourth Epicurean Criterion of Truth.Jan Maximilian Robitzsch - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):601-616.
    This paper discusses ἐπιβολαὶ τῆς διανοίας, which later Epicureans are supposed to have elevated to a fourth criterion of truth to complement perceptions, preconceptions and feelings. By examining Epicurus’ extant writings, the paper distinguishes three different senses of the term: ‘thought in general’, ‘act of attention’ and ‘mental perception’. It is argued that only the sense ‘mental perception’ yields a plausible reading of ἐπιβολαί as a criterion of truth. The paper then turns to the textual evidence on ἐπιβολαί in later (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  6
    Can Figures Persuade? Zeugma as a Figure of Persuasion in Latin.William Michael Short - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):632-648.
    Use of rhetorical figures has been an element of persuasive speech at least since Gorgias of Leontini, for whom such deliberate deviations from ordinary literal language were a defining feature of what he called the ‘psychagogic art’. But must we consider figures of speech limited to an ornamental and merely stylistic function, as some ancient and still many modern theorists suggest? Not according to contemporary cognitive rhetoric, which proposes that figures of speech can play a fundamentally argumentative role in speech (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  2
    Re-Enactments of the Prologue in Cupid's Palace: An Immersive Reading of Apuleius’ Story of Cupid and Psyche.Aldo Tagliabue - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):799-818.
    This article offers a new interpretation of Apuleius’ story of Cupid and Psyche. Most scholars have previously offered a second-time reading of this story, according to which the reader reaches Book 11 and then looks back at Psyche's story of fall and redemption as a parallel for Lucius’ life. Following Graverini's and other scholars’ emotional approach to the Metamorphoses, I argue that the ecphrasis of Cupid's palace within the story of Cupid and Psyche includes multiple re-enactments of the novel's prologue. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Retire with Thanks: Rethinking Lucretius 3.962.Tetsufumi Takeshita - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):895-897.
    This article aims at proposing a solution to one of the well-known textual cruces in Lucretius’ De rerum natura. After a brief survey of the suggested emendations, the author will shed some fresh light on Manning's gratus, which recent editors have curiously neglected. The idea that the old man should retire from life with thanks is not uncommon among classical writers. In addition, parallel expressions are also found in Epicurus’ own words. This article concludes that gratus is what we would (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. The Beauty of Failure: Hamartia in Aristotle's Poetics.Hilde Vinje - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):582-600.
    In Poetics 13, Aristotle claims that the protagonist in the most beautiful tragedies comes to ruin through some kind of ‘failure’—in Greek, hamartia. There has been notorious disagreement among scholars about the moral responsibility involved in hamartia. This article defends the old reading of hamartia as a character flaw, but with an important modification: rather than explaining the hero's weakness as general weakness of will (akrasia), it argues that the tragic hero is blinded by temper (thumos) or by a pursuit (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. An Unknown Preface From Diodorus’ Bibliothêkê (Book 34)?Piotr Wozniczka - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):655-675.
    This paper deals with two fragments from Diodorus’ Bibliothêkê that are unanimously considered to belong to the narrative of the First Slave Revolt in Sicily. It is the main concern of this paper to demonstrate that they most likely did not, but instead originate from an unknown preface to Book 34. The article begins with a brief introduction into Diodorus’ prefaces and discusses the Byzantine transmission of both fragments. Against this backdrop, three main steps are consecutively applied to prove the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. An Unknown Preface From Diodorus’ Bibliothêkê (Book 34)? – Corrigendum.Piotr Wozniczka - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):911-911.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. The Return of the Pipers: In Search of Narrative Models for the Aition of the Qvinqvatrvs Minvscvlae.Kamila Wysłucha - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):693-706.
    The article argues that the famous story about the strike, exile and return of the Roman aulos players, which is recorded in the sixth book of Ovid's Fasti and referred to by other Latin and Greek sources, is based on a narrative model that already existed in Greece in the Archaic period. The study draws parallels between the tale of the pipers and the myth of the return of Hephaestus to Olympus, suggesting that, apart from similar plots, the two stories (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  9
    Semantic Satiation for Poetic Effect.Daniel Anderson - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):34-51.
    This article argues that the defamiliarization caused by extensive repetition, termed ‘semantic satiation’ in psychology, was used by ancient poets for specific effects. Five categories of repetition are identified. First, words undergo auditory deformation through syllable and sound repetition, as commonly in ancient etymologies. Second, a tradition of emphatic proper-name repetition is identified, in which the final instance of the name is given special emphasis; this tradition spans Greek and Latin poetry, and ultimately goes back to the Nireus entry in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  1
    The Dating of Philippos of Amphipolis.Brent Arehart - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):459-461.
    On the basis of two neglected testimonia, this short note argues that the terminus ante quem for Philippos of Amphipolis should be moved forward to the third century or to the early fourth century c.e. if not earlier.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. A Stylish Exit: Marcus Terentius’ Swansong (Tacitus, Annals 6.8), Curtius Rufus and Virgil.Rhiannon Ash - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):330-346.
    Within the narrative for a.d. 32, Tacitus recreates a spirited speech delivered before the Senate by the eques Marcus Terentius, defending himself retrospectively for having been a ‘friend’ of Sejanus. This speech, the only extended speech in oratio recta to feature in Annals Book 6, is historiographically rich and suggestive.This article first analyses the speech as a compelling piece of oratory in its own right. It then explores the provocative mirroring of another important speech in Curtius Rufus. This is where (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  3
    On Gilgamesh and Homer: Ishtar, Aphrodite and the Meaning of a Parallel.Bernardo Ballesteros - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):1-21.
    This article reconsiders the similarities between Aphrodite's ascent to Olympus and Ishtar's ascent to heaven in Iliad Book 5 and the Standard Babylonian Gilgamesh Tablet VI respectively. The widely accepted hypothesis of an Iliadic reception of the Mesopotamian poem is questioned, and the consonance explained as part of a vast stream of tradition encompassing ancient Near Eastern and early Greek narrative poetry. Compositional and conceptual patterns common to the two scenes are first analyzed in a broader early Greek context, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  1
    Colour Terms and the Creation of Statius’ Ekphrastic Style.Lorenza Bennardo - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):292-307.
    This paper focusses on colour terminology as a tool for achieving ἐνάργεια in the Latin poetry of the first century c.e. After briefly outlining the developments in the concept of ἐνάργεια from Aristotle to Quintilian, the paper considers the use of Latin terms for black in three descriptive passages from Statius’ epic poem, the Thebaid. It is observed that the poet privileges the juxtaposition of the two adjectives ater and niger in a pattern of uariatio, where ater often carries a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  2
    Seneca, Qvaestiones Natvrales 4b.4.2: Aeris or Temporis? Remarks on the Meaning of Tempvs.Álvaro Cancela Cilleruelo - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):276-284.
    In Quaestiones naturales 4b.4.2 Seneca states that in early spring the weather drastically changes: in the warmer sky larger water droplets are formed and cause rain. The description of this ‘greater change’ is linked in the manuscript tradition to two different controversial readings, temporis and aeris, which are irregularly distributed. Most recent editors have printed the first reading, but H.M. Hine is probably right to accept aeris. A careful linguistic, stemmatic and stylistic examination shows that temporis is likely to be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  1
    Female Pain in Prudentius’ Peristephanon.Jacqueline Clarke - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):386-401.
    Within Prudentius’ Peristephanon there are three main episodes which focus upon the torture and/or death of women: the torture and death of Eulalia in Perist. 3, that of Encratis in Perist. 4 and the death of Agnes in Perist. 14. This article compares the variety and types of pain that these women are depicted as undergoing during their martyrdoms, analysing the extent to which gender and sexuality play a role in their responses to pain or to the threat of it. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Pseudo-Apuleius’ de Fato.Leonardo Costantini - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):461-462.
    The note presents the discovery of a spurious Apuleian work entitled De fato from MS n° 1040 at the Bibliothèque patrimoniale Villon in Rouen. This work is, in fact, a series of excerpts from Firmicus Maternus, Mathesis Book 1.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  4
    Since Orpheus Was in Short Pants: Reassessing Oeagrus at Aristophanes, Wasps 579–80.Robert Cowan - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):89-94.
    In Aristophanes’ Wasps, Philocleon says that he and his fellow jurors do not acquit Oeagrus until he has recited a speech from the Niobe. Scholars have almost universally assumed that this was the name of a contemporary tragic actor, despite its extreme rarity. This article argues that the reference is rather to the father of Orpheus. As a figure from the generation before the archetypal bard, ‘an Oeagrus’ represents the old-fashioned poetry to which Philocleon and his fellow jurors are devoted.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Cassiodorus, Institvtiones 1.28.3 and Lactantius, Divinae Institvtiones 3.28.22.Marco Cristini - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):465-466.
    This note identifies the source of a brief quotation in Cassiodorus, Institutiones 1.28.3 as a passage of Lactantius, Diuinae Institutiones 3.28.22. It argues that Cassiodorus possibly intended to draw an implicit comparison between himself and Lactantius.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  1
    The Dipylon Oinochoē and Ancient Greek Dance Aesthetics.Eric Cullhed - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):22-33.
    This article asks what the graffito incised on the Dipylon oinochoē reveals about the nature of the dance competition that it commemorates. Through a systematic analysis of the evaluative and descriptive meaning of the adjective ἀταλός and its cognates in early Greek epic, it is argued that a narrower definition compared to previous suggestions can be established. The word refers to the carefreeness that is specific to a child or young animal, and its uses typically imply a positive evaluation which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. The History of Bilingual Dictionaries Reconsidered: An Ancient Fragment Related to Ps.-Philoxenus (P.Vars. 6) and its Significance. [REVIEW]Eleanor Dickey - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):359-378.
    This article identifies a papyrus in Warsaw, P.Vars. 6, as a fragment of the large Latin–Greek glossary known as Ps.-Philoxenus. That glossary, published in volume II of G. Goetz's Corpus Glossariorum Latinorum on the basis of a ninth-century manuscript, is by far the most important of the bilingual glossaries surviving from antiquity, being derived from lost works of Roman scholarship and preserving valuable information about rare and archaic Latin words. It has long been considered a product of the sixth century (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  51.  1
    Notes on Seven Passages of Plutarch's Lives.James Diggle - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):454-458.
    This article discusses the text and interpretation of passages in Plutarch's Lives of Romulus, Agis and Cleomenes, Pericles, Brutus, Marcellus, Alexander and Marius.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  52.  1
    A Note on Aristophanes, Knights 295.Jasper F. Donelan - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):440-442.
    This note discusses the meaning of the word κοπροφορεῖν at Aristophanes, Knights 295 and proposes a translation.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  53. Numa and Jupiter: Whose Smile is It, Anyway?Lindsay G. Driediger-Murphy - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):259-275.
    This article examines the Roman tradition that Numa once negotiated with Jupiter about human sacrifice. Complete versions of the myth survive in Ovid, Plutarch and Arnobius. Previous studies of this tradition have proposed four main interpretations of it, which have done important service in modern reconstructions of the character of Roman religion. These scholarly treatments raise several questions. First, are they actually supported by, or the most convincing way of reading, the surviving ancient sources? If so, have they been correctly (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  54.  1
    Greek Conceptualizations of Persian Traditions: Gift-Giving and Friendship in the Persian Empire.Samuel Ellis - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):77-88.
    This article examines gift-giving within the Persian empire and its perception in Greek literary sources. Gift-giving in the Greek world was often framed in the language of friendship, and Greek authors subsequently articulated Persian traditions using the language and cultural norms of their intended audience. There were fundamental differences in the concepts of gift-exchange and reciprocity between the Greeks and the Persians. This article will examine Persian traditions of gift-giving followed by Greek traditions of gift-giving, and will argue that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  55.  1
    Three Greek Proper Names in Ovid, Metamorphoses Book 10.Pere Fàbregas Salis - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):446-451.
    This paper discusses the transcription of three Greek proper names in Ovid, Metamorphoses Book 10. It argues that we should read Haemon, Amycliade and Panchaica rather than Haemum, Amyclide and Panchaia.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  56. Plato and the Dangerous Pleasures of Poikilia.Jonathan Fine - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):152-169.
    A significant strand of the ethical psychology, aesthetics and politics of Plato's Republic revolves around the concept of poikilia, ‘fascinating variety’. Plato uses the concept to caution against harmful appetitive pleasures purveyed by democracy and such artistic or cultural practices as mimetic poetry. His aim, this article shows, is to contest a prominent conceptual connection between poikilia and beauty (kallos, to kalon). Exploiting tensions in the archaic and classical Greek concept, Plato associates poikilia with dangerous pleasures to redirect admiration toward (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  57.  1
    Textual Notes on Ps.-Dioscorides, on Simples.John G. Fitch - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):285-291.
    This article discusses the text of the work On Simples attributed to Dioscorides. It argues that in fifteen places the transmitted text is faulty, and it proposes emendations. It also studies certain types of insertions made in the text by its most recent editor, Max Wellmann, and concludes that they are unnecessary. Finally, it discusses two points where On Simples sheds light on Dioscorides’ De materia medica.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  58. Varro and Pompey: Some More (Multiple) Hebdomads?Joseph Geiger - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):253-258.
    This article argues that a group of fourteen female statues seen in the Theatre of Pompey in Rome by Tatian belonged to Greek female poets. This group, along with the statues representing the fourteen nationes vanquished by Pompey, and certain groups of statues in the Forum of Augustus should all be ascribed to the influence of the Hebdomades of Pompey's familiaris Varro.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  59.  21
    The Beautiful Girl: An Erotic Reading of Socrates’ First Argument in Plato's Hippias Major.Solveig Lucia Gold - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):135-151.
    ABSTRACTThis article looks to Attic comedy to explain Socrates’ first argument in Plato's Hippias Major: his refutation of Hippias’ claim that the Beautiful is a beautiful girl. As part of his argument, Socrates introduces three examples of beautiful things—a mare, a lyre and a pot —all of which are used in comedy as metaphorical obscenities for sexualized women. The author contends that an erotic reading of the text accomplishes what no other interpretation can: a unified account of the passage that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  60. Lyric Location and Performance Circumstances in Sappho and Alcaeus: A Cognitive Approach.David Gribble - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):52-70.
    A striking feature of the songs of Sappho and Alcaeus is their constant use of ‘deictic’ signals to establish a setting in a specific location in time and space. This article examines the created worlds of Sappho and Alcaeus, drawing on cognitive methodologies, in particular Text World Theory. It argues for the importance of a methodological distinction between the circumstances of performance of the songs, and the cognitive world they create. The locations established by the songs are designed to assimilate (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  61. What the Rulers Want: Xenophon on Cyrus’ Psychology.Rodrigo Illarraga - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):170-182.
    This article presents an interpretation of Cyrus’ psychology in Xenophon's Cyropaedia. Its point is that Cyrus’ psychological structure is composed by a set of three desires given by nature and a set of virtues acquired by education. The paper will argue that Cyrus, as an enkratic ruler, does not long for any kind of honours, but is guided by true philotimía, that is, the desire for true honours—honours freely given by gratitude or admiration. philanthrōpía is the key to achieve these (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  62.  3
    Aristotle, Metaphysics a 10, 993a13–15: A New Reading and its Implication for the Unity of Book Alpha.Mirjam E. Kotwick - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):183-188.
    This article argues for an emendation in Aristotle's Metaphysics A 10, 993a13–15. The emendation is based on a hitherto overlooked reading preserved in Alexander of Aphrodisias’ commentary on A 7. First, the article problematizes the reading of the Metaphysics manuscripts in terms of syntax, diction and content. Second, it shows that Alexander's reading is free of all three problems. Third, it argues for the originality of Alexander's reading according to the principle utrum in alterum abiturum erat? and based on the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  63. Attis on Ogygia: Catullus’ Carmen 63 and the Odyssey.Jan M. Kozlowski - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):230-239.
    Scholars have long noticed a similarity of motifs between Catullus’ Carmen 63 and the fifth book of the Odyssey, where the story of Odysseus’ captivity on Ogygia is narrated. A detailed analysis of the poems shows that Catullus wanted the reader to see in this Homeric episode a kind of matrix for the interpretation of Attis’ sojourn at Cybele. The discovery of this dependence casts a light on some of the hitherto proposed interpretations of Carmen 63.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  64. A Fictive Membership Rush and Curatorial Fraud in the Lex of the Collegivm of Ivory and Citrus-Wood Merchants.Richard Last - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):347-358.
    The law of the collegium of ivory and citrus-wood merchants is best known for its suspected prohibition against outsiders or non-practitioners. The present study argues that the regulation in question actually prohibits curatores from enrolling outsiders—the text curiously labels such an offense ‘fraud’. Rather than banning outsiders altogether, the law provides that only quinquennales shall have the authority to admit non-practitioners. It is still a rather unusual law, and since it conveys the impression that this collegium is wildly popular even (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  65. A Heraclitean Allusion to the Odyssey.Tom Mackenzie - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):71-76.
    This article applies and defends an intertextual approach to Heraclitus B51 DK, the ‘bow-lyre fragment’. It argues that the fragment alludes to the climactic scene of the Odyssey in which the hero strings the bow and is likened to an expert lyre-player. It then explores some implications of this point for our understanding of the significance of the fragment, of the sixth-century reception of the Odyssey and of Parmenides’ reception of Heraclitus.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  66.  7
    Neglected Evidence for Aristotle, Historia Animalivm 7(8) in the Works of Ancient Homeric Scholars.Robert Mayhew - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):442-446.
    This brief article aims to supplement Stefan Schnieders's presentation of the evidence for Historia animalium 7—that is, Book 7 according to the manuscript tradition, Book 8 according to Theodore Gaza's rearrangement—having been considered the seventh book of this work in antiquity. This is accomplished through the discussion of two texts not considered by Schnieders, both of them passages commenting on Iliad Book 21: P.Oxy. 221 and Porphyry, Homeric Questions Book 1.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  67.  1
    Becoming Κλεινοσ in Crete and Magna Graecia: Dionysiac Mysteries and Maturation Rituals Revisited.Mark F. McClay - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):108-118.
    This article reconsiders the historical and typological relation between Greek maturation rituals and Greek mystery religion. Particular attention is given to the word κλεινός and its ritual uses in two roughly contemporary Late Classical sources: an Orphic-Bacchic funerary gold leaf from Hipponion in Magna Graecia and Ephorus’ account of a Cretan pederastic age-transition rite. In both contexts, κλεινός marks an elevated status conferred by initiation. Without positing direct development between puberty rites and mysteries, the article argues on the basis of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  68.  1
    Pliny, Tacitus and the Monuments of Pallas.James McNamara - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):308-329.
    This article is a discussion of Plin. Ep. 7.29 and Ep. 8.6, in which he presents his reaction to seeing the grave monument of Marcus Antonius Pallas, the freedman and minister of the Emperor Claudius, beside the Via Tiburtina. The monument records a senatorial vote of thanks to Pallas, and Pliny expresses intense indignation at the Senate's subservience and at the power and influence wielded by a freedman. This article compares Pliny's letters with Tacitus’ account of the senatorial vote of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  69. The Family Traditions of the Gens Marcia Between the Fourth and Third Centuries B.C.Davide Morelli - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):189-199.
    In the mid fourth century b.c. some Roman gentes drew on a Pythagorean tradition. In this tradition, Numa's role of Pythagoras’ disciple connected Rome with Greek elites and culture. The Marcii, between 304 and 300 b.c., used Numa's figure, recently reshaped by the Aemilii and the Pinarii for their propaganda, to promote the need for a plebeian pontificate. After the approval of the Ogulnium plebiscite, the needs for this kind of propaganda fell away. When Marcius Censorinus became censor, Numa's pontificate (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  70. Tragic Noise and Rhetorical Frigidity in Lycophron's Alexandra.Thomas J. Nelson & Katherine Molesworth - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):200-215.
    This paper seeks to shed fresh light on the aesthetic and stylistic affiliations of Lycophron's Alexandra, approaching the poem from two distinct but complementary angles. First, it explores what can be gained by reading Lycophron's poem against the backdrop of Callimachus’ poetry. It contends that the Alexandra presents a radical and polemical departure from the Alexandrian's poetic programme, pointedly appropriating key Callimachean images while also countering Callimachus’ apparent dismissal of the ‘noisy’ tragic genre. Previous scholarship has noted links between the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  71.  2
    New Poetic Fragments From a Neglected Witness of Ps.-Trypho's de Tropis: Callimachus, Ps.-Hesiod, Ps.-Simonides.Filippomaria Pontani & Maria Giovanna Sandri - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):240-252.
    A treatise on rhetorical tropes is attributed in manuscripts to the first-century grammarian Trypho: this article considers for the first time a fifteenth-century manuscript of this work, which turns out to be the only complete witness of its hitherto unknown original version; this version is also partly found in another fifteenth-century manuscript now kept in Olomouc. Four interesting poetic fragments are quoted in this newly discovered, fuller version of Ps.-Trypho's De Tropis: some lines from Callimachus’ fifth and fourth Iambi, an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  72. What Does the Term Togata ‘Really’ Mean?G. E. Rallo - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):216-229.
    This article aims to shed fresh light on the meaning of the term togata. It conducts an analysis of the term as it appeared in ancient sources,1 investigating in particular both how and why ancient authors across several periods focussed their attention on the togata. The paper will also distinguish between the attestation of the term togata in ancient writers, who are likely to have actually watched these theatrical performances in person and known more directly what they were talking about, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  73. Addendum to ‘Did Cicero “Proscribe” Marcus Antonius?’.John T. Ramsey - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):452-454.
    This note adduces three passages in Seneca the Elder to reinforce a demonstration in CQ 69, 793–8001 that the text of Plin. HN 7.117 has suffered corruption in one of its clauses and requires emendation to restore Pliny's intent. This additional evidence concerns a trope employed by declaimers which could have predisposed a scribe to alter Pliny's text to state that Cicero proscribed Mark Antony. Such a statement has no place in a list of achievements that otherwise all belong to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  74.  1
    Themistius Against Porphyry (?) On ‘Why We Do Not Remember’.Robert Roreitner - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):379-385.
    This article sheds new light on Themistius’ argument in what is philosophically the most original section of his extant work, namely On Aristotle's On the Soul 100.16–109.3: here, Themistius offers a systematic interpretation of Aristotle's ‘agent’ intellect and its ‘potential’ and ‘passive’ counterparts. A solution to two textual difficulties at 101.36–102.2 is proposed, supported by the Arabic translation. This allows us to see that Themistius engages at length with a Platonizing reading of the enigmatic final lines of De anima III.5, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  75.  5
    The Historia Avgvsta Before Ms Pal. Lat. 899: Lost Manuscripts and Scribal Mediation.Martin Shedd - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):402-421.
    This article re-evaluates the role of the manuscript tradition of the Historia Augusta in debates over the original contents and authorship of the text. Evidence for physical disruptions to the text before our oldest surviving manuscripts points to an earlier manuscript distributed across multiple codices. A multi-volume archetype eliminates critical arguments against the author's claims about lives missing before the Life of Hadrian as well as in the lacuna for the years a.d. 244–260. Other multi-volume codices of the eighth and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  76. The Rates of Jury Pay and Assembly Pay in Fourth-Century Athens.Robert Sing - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):119-134.
    During the fourth century, the amount of money Athenians got from the polis for volunteering to sit on a jury and for attending the assembly diverged significantly. Jury pay remained at 3 obols a day, despite inflation, while the pay given for a principal assembly eventually rose from 1 obol to 9 obols—outpacing inflation and overcompensating most citizens for their time. What demographic reconstruction of the jury can explain why the real value of jury pay never declined to the point (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  77.  3
    On the Political Outlook of the ‘Anonymus Iamblichi’.Anders Dahl Sørensen - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):95-107.
    The political outlook of the so-called ‘Anonymus Iamblichi’ has been a subject of controversy in the scholarly literature, with some commentators judging him to be a committed democrat, while others see in him a partisan of aristocracy or even oligarchy. This disagreement is not surprising, for the text contains passages that seem to pull in opposite directions. The article suggests that we move beyond the one-dimensional oligarch-or-democrat model traditionally employed and instead approach the issue from a fresh angle, applying the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  78.  2
    A Neglected Manuscript of the Glossary of Placidus and the History of the Text.Jarrett T. Welsh & Jesse Hill - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):422-439.
    This paper identifies a neglected manuscript, Viterbo, Centro Diocesano di Documentazione, Capitolare 51, as the extant archetype of the Libri Romani version of the glossary of Placidus. It first demonstrates that R is the parent of the three witnesses to the Libri Romani text used by editors, and it considers the implications of the neglected manuscript for future editions of the text. It then corroborates the importance of R by tracing its travels in humanistic and antiquarian circles in Italy in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  79. An Emendation in Hesychius Π 196.Georgios A. Xenis - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):462-464.
    The entry π 196 of Hesychius is textually corrupt. This note challenges the traditional way of explaining the corruption and emending the text, which goes back to Marcus Musurus, and replaces it with a simpler and more economical approach.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues