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  1.  6
    ‘I Will Interpret’: The Eighth Letter as a Response to Plato's Literary Method and Political Thought.Carol Atack - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):616-635.
    This paper explores the political thought and literary devices contained in the pseudo-Platonic Eighth Letter, treating it as a later response to the political thought and literary style of Plato, particularly the exploration of the mixed constitution and the mechanisms for the restraint of monarchical power contained in the Laws. It examines the specific historical problems of this letter, and works through its supposed Sicilian context, its narrator's assessment of the situation, and the lengthy prosopopoeia of the dead Syracusan politician (...)
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  2.  5
    Orion's Club. A Note on Germanicus, Arati Phaenomena 651.Emanuele Berti - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):916-917.
    In lines 646–60 of his translation of Aratus’ Phaenomena, Germanicus narrates the story of Orion, the mythical hunter killed by a scorpion sent by Diana because of his attempt to rape the goddess, and then transformed into a star. In particular, line 651 describes Orion's hunting:nudabatque feris angusto stipite siluas.
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  3.  2
    Things Can Only Get Better for Socrates and His Crocodile: How Onomastics Can Benefit From Digital Humanities.Yanne Broux - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):825-845.
    In a forthcoming article, Willy Clarysse presents an overview of the name Socrates in Egypt. He argues for an evolution from a ‘normal Greek name’, with no specific reference to the Athenian philosopher, to a Greek name with Egyptian connotations.
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  4. Were There Slaves in the Audience of Plautus’ Comedies?Peter Brown - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):654-671.
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the evidence commonly claimed to show the presence of slaves in the audience of Plautus’ comedies and to argue that it more probably shows the opposite, that slaves were not present, or at least were expected not to be. The question is given some urgency by the appearance of Amy Richlin's new book, which takes the presence of slaves in the audience for granted and builds on it to develop a view of (...)
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  5.  1
    Lucretius’ Use of the Name Iphianassa.Robert Brown - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):715-724.
    The name Iphianassa occurs only once in Latin literature—in the proem to De Rerum Natura. Here Lucretius illustrates the evils of religion with a description of Iphianassa's sacrifice at Aulis :illud in his rebus uereor, ne forte rearisimpia te rationis inire elementa uiamqueindugredi sceleris. quod contra saepius illareligio peperit scelerosa atque impia facta.Aulide quo pacto Triuiai uirginis aramIphianassai turparunt sanguine foedeductores Danaum delecti, prima uirorum.cui simul infula uirgineos circumdata comptusex utraque pari malarum parte profusast,et maestum simul ante aras adstare parentemsensit (...)
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  6.  2
    Skēptron in Sophocles’ Oedipvs Rex.Francesco Cannizzaro, Stefano Fanucchi, Francesco Morosi & Leyla Ozbek - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):515-522.
    In Sophocles’ Oedipus Coloneus, after laying hands on Antigone and Ismene, Creon ridicules Oedipus by saying these words :οὔκουν ποτ’ ἐκ τούτοιν γε μὴ σκήπτροιν ἔτιὁδοιπορήσῃς.Then you shall never more walk with the aid of these two props!It is possible that Creon is here alluding to Oedipus’ actual appearance throughout the play. As far as we know, Oedipus comes on stage with no walking stick, and uses Antigone and Ismene as a crutch while walking. Creon's comparing Oedipus’ daughters to a (...)
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  7.  5
    Varro on Adjective Gradation: De Lingva Latina 6.59 and Aelius Stilo's Avoidance of Novissimvs.Wolfgang D. C. de Melo - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):905-910.
    Varro's De lingua Latina is a treasure trove of information. Of the originally twenty-five books, six have come down to us more or less complete. Among these, Books 5–7 give us many hundreds of etymologies, and Books 8–10 discuss the question whether Latin morphology is regular or not. What Varro rarely comments on is sociolinguistic variation. The sociolinguistic comments in Varro's work can almost be counted on one hand. For instance, in 5.162 Varro remarks that cenaculum, from cena ‘dinner’, means (...)
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  8.  4
    Democritus and Allegoresis.Mikolaj Domaradzki - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):545-556.
    This paper discusses the problem of Democritus’ allegoresis. The question whether Democritus practised allegoresis is usually answered affirmatively. Thus, for example, Jean Pépin, in his classic work on the development of allegorical interpretation, forcefully asserts that ‘Démocrite pratiqua d'abord une allégorie physique’ and that ‘il poursuivit aussi l'allégorie psychologique’. In one way or another, this view has been embraced by Luc Brisson, Ilaria Ramelli, Ilaria Ramelli and Giulio Lucchetta, Gerard Naddaf, to name just a few scholars who have recently examined (...)
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  9.  4
    Three Textual Notes on Cicero, de Lege Agraria 2.Andrew R. Dyck - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):901-903.
    2.4: itaque me non extrema †tribus† suffragiorum, sed primi illi uestri concursus, neque singulae uoces praeconum, sed una uox uniuersi populi Romani consulem declarauit.Cicero narrates his election as consul. The above is the text printed by G. Manuwald, who notes that the construction of tribus is ‘odd’ and was queried by J.-L. Ferrary. She suspects that tribus ‘may be an explanatory gloss that entered the text’ and should therefore be deleted with Kayser. She rejects Richter's conjecture diribitio for tribus as (...)
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  10.  3
    Two Textual Notes on Cicero, de Officiis.Andrew R. Dyck - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):910-911.
    1.21: ex quo, quia suum cuiusque fit eorum quae natura fuerant communia quod cuique obtigit, id quisque teneat; †e quo si quis† sibi appetet, uiolabit ius humanae societatis.The base text cited is that of Winterbottom. After discussing the origin of private property, Cicero asserts that it should be maintained as distributed. Of the matter marked corrupt, e quo is likely to be a repetition of the preceding ex quo and therefore intrusive. si quis evidently requires supplementation. Müller inserted quid after (...)
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  11.  2
    Structuring the ‘History of Philosophy’—a Comparison Between Philodemus and Diogenes Laertius in the Light of New Evidence.Kilian Fleischer - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):684-699.
    Considering the fair amount of ancient authors who compiled works on the subject of the ‘History of Philosophy’, it is remarkable—and regrettable—that there is no solid basis for a comparative analysis of their structures. Most ancient histories of philosophy are only preserved in a few fragments or excerpts and hardly allow any meaningful non-trivial comparison of the structure and order of the philosophers and schools discussed. The only more or less entirely preserved ‘History of Philosophy’ is Diogenes Laertius’ famous treatise. (...)
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  12.  5
    Some Possible Fragments of Early Mythography in Stephanus of Byzantium.Robert L. Fowler - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):501-506.
    In this article I consider five anonymous quotations in Stephanus of Byzantium. The first is very probably an overlooked fragment of early mythography. The other four are much less likely to be early, but theoretically could be and are included for the sake of completeness.
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  13.  4
    Notes on the Text of Catalepton 10.T. E. Franklinos - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):912-915.
    Catalepton 10 is a unique survival from antiquity: it is the only parody of an entire poem to reach us, and is written in pure iambic trimeters, a near intractable metre. Addressed to Sabinus, an upstart muleteer, the poem launches a stinging attack at him, and draws attention to his status as a parvenu. It remains incredibly close to its charming model—Catullus 4 —in structural, lexical, stylistic and metrical terms, but rather different in purport. In attempting to reassess a number (...)
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  14.  2
    Temple Prostitution at Aphaca: An Overlooked Source.Craig A. Gibson - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):928-931.
    In her book The Myth of Sacred Prostitution in Antiquity, Stephanie Budin compiles and analyses an impressive array of literary sources which describe, or have been interpreted as describing, several practices that modern scholars have collectively and variously called sacred, ritual, cultic or temple prostitution. In general, as Budin explains, ‘[s]acred prostitution is the sale of a person's body for sexual purposes where some portion of the money or goods received for this transaction belongs to a deity … usually Aphrodite’. (...)
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  15.  1
    Bugonia and the Aetiology of Didactic Poetry in Virgil, Georgics 4.Patrick Glauthier - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):745-763.
    Roughly half way through the fourth Georgic, Virgil confronts a sad reality: on occasion the entire population of a hive can perish without warning and leave the bee-keeping farmer bee-less. In response to such a devastating loss, the poet describes an Egyptian procedure, to which modern critics have given the name bugonia, whereby the farmer acquires a new swarm of bees from the putrefying carcass of a dead ox. After the account of bugonia, the poem takes a notoriously unexpected turn. (...)
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  16.  5
    Homer and the Wrath of Julian.David Neal Greenwood - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):887-895.
    ‘Everyone who now reads and writes in the West, of whatever racial background, sex or ideological camp, is still a son or daughter of Homer.’ While the extent to which this claim is accurate has been disputed, it is not wrong in our own day to grant the highest honours for ongoing influence to the author of the Iliad. All the more so in Late Antiquity, a period frequently viewed as hermetically isolated from the classical world, but which resolutely viewed (...)
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  17.  2
    Odysseus and His Bed. From Significant Objects to Thing Theory in Homer.Jonas Grethlein - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):467-482.
    Things in Homer cannot complain about a lack of attention. Nearly forty years ago, Jasper Griffin, in response to the oralist emphasis on composition and formulaic language, drew our attention to the many significant objects populating the Iliad and the Odyssey. Nestor's cup, for example, is so heavy that other men have difficulties to lift it; the cup illustrates the eminence of its owner who rubbed shoulders with the far greater heroes of the past. As Griffin demonstrated, Homer deftly uses (...)
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  18.  3
    Disjunctions and Natural Philosophy in Marcus Aurelius.Benjamin Harriman - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):858-879.
    In his Meditations, Marcus Aurelius repeatedly presents a disjunction between two conceptions of the natural world. Either the universe is ruled by providence or there are atoms. At 4.3, we find perhaps its most succinct statement: ἀνανεωσάμενος τὸ διεζευγμένον τό⋅ ἤτοι πρόνοια ἢ ἄτομοι. The formulation of the disjunction differs; at 7.32, being composed of atoms is contrasted with a stronger sort of unity that may survive death. In 10.6 and 11.18 Marcus simply offers φύσις in opposition. On the surface, (...)
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  19.  2
    A Persian Marriage Feast in Macedon?Thomas Harrison - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):507-514.
    Herodotus’ fateful tale of the seven Persian emissaries sent to seek Earth and Water from the Macedonian king Amyntes has been the subject of increasingly rich discussion in recent years. Generations of commentators have cumulatively revealed the ironies of Herodotus’ account: its repeated hints, for example, of the Persians’ eventual end; and, crowning all other ironies, the story's ending: that, after resisting the indignity of his female relatives being molested at a banquet, and disposing of all trace of the Persian (...)
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  20.  5
    Notes on the Etymologies in Plato's Cratylus.Christina Hoenig - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):557-565.
    Recent scholarship on Plato's Cratylus has yielded interpretations that assign various functions of philosophical importance to the dialogue's lengthy etymological section. Barney considers the section an ‘agonistic display’ in which Socrates beats contemporary practitioners of etymology at their own game while, at the same time, offering a cosmological theory intended for serious intellectual competition. In this context, Barney emphasizes the importance of Parmenides, a charioteer who journeys towards Truth, as a literary point of reference for Socrates’ own etymological quest after (...)
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  21.  2
    Pythagoras and Isis.Carl Huffman - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):880-886.
    In this article I want to clarify the text of one of the short maxims assigned to Pythagoras in the ancient tradition, which are known as symbola or acusmata. Before I turn to the acusma in question, it is important to understand the context in which it appears. It occurs in Chapter 17 of Book 4 of Aelian's Historical Miscellany. Aelian's work was written in the early third century a.d. in Rome, and is a ‘miscellaneous collection of anecdotes and historical (...)
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  22.  1
    Two Acrostics in Horace's Satires.Talitha Kearey - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):734-744.
    Hunters of acrostics have had little luck with Horace. Despite his manifest love of complex wordplay, virtuoso metrical tricks and even alphabet games, acrostics seem largely absent from Horace's poetry. The few that have been sniffed out in recent years are, with one notable exception, either fractured and incomplete—the postulated PINN- in Carm. 4.2.1–4 —or disappointingly low-stakes; suggestions of acrostics are largely confined to the Odes alone. Besides diverging from the long-standing Roman obsession with literary acrostics, Horace's apparent lack of (...)
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  23.  2
    Sung Poems and Poetic Songs: Hellenistic Definitions of Poetry, Music and the Spaces in Between.Spencer A. Klavan - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):597-615.
    Simply by formulating a question about the nature of ancient Greek poetry or music, any modern English speaker is already risking anachronism. In recent years especially, scholars have reminded one another that the words ‘music’ and ‘poetry’ denote concepts with no easy counterpart in Greek. μουσική in its broadest sense evokes not only innumerable kinds of structured movement and sound but also the political, psychological and cosmic order of which song, verse and dance are supposed to be perceptible manifestations. Likewise, (...)
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  24.  3
    Infinite Worlds in the Thought of Anaximander.Radim Kočandrle - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):483-500.
    Some classical authors ascribe to Anaximander of Miletus a belief in the existence of infinite worlds. Their testimonies have provoked an extensive discussion on the question of whether Anaximander spoke of successive or coexistent worlds, or perhaps only one world that undergoes changes. Of course, this subject is related to important aspects of archaic cosmologies. First, we need to investigate whether one can even speak of a notion of coexistent worlds prior to atomist theories. Second, the issue of infinite worlds (...)
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  25.  4
    Atalante Philandros: Teasing Out Satyric Innuendo.Rebecca Laemmle - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):846-857.
    Among the one-word fragments from unknown plays of Sophocles, fr. inc. 1111 R. has been treated as one of the more straightforward. It derives from a passage in Hermogenes of Tarsos’ treatise Περὶ Ἰδεῶν, which includes the Sophoclean adjective, its referent and a brief gloss: … ὁ Σοφοκλῆς … φίλανδρόν που τὴν Ἀταλάντην εἶπε διὰ τὸ ἀσπάζεσθαι σὺν ἀνδράσιν εἶναι. Brunck assigned the fragment to Sophocles’ tragic Meleagros; most subsequent editors have edited the fragment as sedis incertae while commenting favourably (...)
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  26.  1
    Literary Evidence for the Presence of Play in Ancient Schools.Christian Laes - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):801-814.
    This paper deals with an apparently straightforward question: the degree to which ancient educators thought it necessary to introduce a playful element into the programmes of schools, and the way in which such ideas were put into practice.
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  27.  4
    The Bellvm Civile Pompeianvm: The War of Words.Pedro López Barja de Quiroga - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):700-714.
    The irrelevance of ideology is perhaps one of the most strongly held views shared by the historians of the Late Republic. As indicated by Matthias Gelzer in 1912, in those final years of the Roman Republic, ‘political struggles were fought out by the nobiles at the head of their dependents’. In his opinion, this was nothing more than a power struggle, in which slogans or ideas were merely propaganda, without any real value. In 1931, analysing the political proposals of Cicero, (...)
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  28.  5
    Arms and Armour: An Emendation to Statius, Silvae 4.4.66.Adalberto Magnavacca - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):925-927.
    In Silv. 4.4 Statius pays homage to Vitorius Marcellus, the young dedicatee of the poem, praising his skills as an orator and foreseeing a brilliant military career for him. The last point is highlighted in a brief portrait of Marcellus as a perfect foot soldier and horseman :… nec enim tibi sola potentiseloquii uirtus: sunt membra accommoda bellis 65quique grauem tarde subeant thoraca lacerti.seu campo pedes ire pares, est agmina supranutaturus apex, seu frena sonantia flectes,seruiet asper equus.
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  29.  6
    Cvcvta Ab Rationibvs Neronis Avgvsti: A Joke at Nero's Expense?Shushma Malik - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):783-792.
    On the outside wall and in the vestibule of the ‘House of Publius Paquius Proculus’ in Pompeii three graffiti containing the name Cucuta can be found. The first simply reads Cucuta. The second tells us that Cucuta was an attendant of the Emperor Nero : Cu | Cucuta Ner. From the third we learn that Cucuta was a financial secretary of Nero : Cucuta ab ra[t]ioni[b]us | Neronis Augusti. While the meaning and significance of these graffiti may seem apparent—that one (...)
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  30.  5
    A Note on Ovid, Heroides 6.117–18.Baruch Martínez Zepeda - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):764-768.
    At Her. 6.113–18 Hypsipyle lays out for Jason the advantages to be gained by marrying her: the prestige of her noble and even divine family, and the fertile island of Lemnos, which will come as her dowry. She then adds the fact that she is pregnant with twins ; this thought introduces a new section, which extends until line 130.
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  31.  12
    Head-Fake: Two Jokes in Lucretius 3.136–50.Michael McOsker - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):903-904.
    Towards the beginning of Book 3, Lucretius starts his description of the soul. According to Epicurus, the soul is divided into two, an irrational part, which is coextensive with the body, and a rational part, the ‘mind’, which is located in the chest. This position is a relic from an earlier, non–philosophical tradition, and was adopted by several different philosophers. But Alexandrian doctors would soon correctly locate the mind in the head, and later Epicureans would have to defend an increasingly (...)
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  32.  5
    Adhvc) Virginevsqve Helicon: A Subtextual Rape in Ovid's Catalogue of Mountains (Met. 2.219.Brian D. McPhee - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):769-775.
    In his lengthy survey of the cosmic devastation wrought by Phaethon's disastrous chariot ride, Ovid includes two catalogues detailing the scorching of the world's mountains and rivers. Ovid enlivens these lists through his usual play with sound patterns and revels in the opportunity to adapt so many Greek names to Latin prosody; for instance the opening line of the catalogue of mountains masterfully illustrates both of these features. The lists are also brimming with playful erudition. To take but a few (...)
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  33.  2
    ‘To Heaven on a Hook’ (Dio Cass. 60.35.4): Ennius, Lucilius and an Ineffectual Council of the Gods in Aeneid 10.Llewelyn Morgan - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):636-653.
    ‘The last stanza of Horace's poem’, writes Denis Feeney of Hor. Carm. 3.3, ‘declares virtually outright that he has just been “quoting” epic matter: “desine peruicax | referre sermones deorum et | magna modis tenuare paruis” ’. A poem that recounts the doings of gods automatically demands comparison with epic, but if the speeches of gods are presented, all the more so. Horace's poem in fact evokes an episode within a specific epic poem, the Council of the Gods that occurred (...)
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  34.  5
    The Question of Genre in Plutarch's Maxime Cvm Principibvs Philosopho Esse Disserendvm.Jacob P. B. Mortensen - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):815-824.
    In his book on Plutarch's Maxime cum principibus philosopho esse disserendum from 2009, Geert Roskam takes up the question of the genre of the work. Few scholars have approached this question and they have had little to say. Hence, Roskam's treatment of the question is much appreciated. Among the suggestions previously put forth is the suggestion by F.H. Sandbach, who argued that the work should be regarded as a treatise, while H.N. Fowler stated in the ‘Introduction’ to the Loeb Classical (...)
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  35.  5
    Plato's Phaedo: Are the Philosophers’ Pleasures of Learning Pure Pleasures?Georgia Mouroutsou - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):566-584.
    Though Plato's Phaedo does not focus on pleasure, some considerable talk on pleasure takes place in it. Socrates argues for the soul's immortality and, while doing so, hopes to highlight to his companions how important it is to take care of our soul by focussing on the intellect and by neglecting the bodily realm as far as is possible in this life. Doing philosophy, so his argument goes, is something like dying, if we grant that death is the separation of (...)
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  36.  4
    Mithridates the Patricide.Jeffrey Murray - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):918-920.
    In a chapter illustrating outrageous words and criminal deeds, Valerius Maximus, the Tiberian editor of exempla, includes in his list of foreign examples reference to an impious son, Mithridates, who fought with his father over who should rule : Mitridates autem multo sceleratius, qui non cum fratre de paterno regno, sed cum ipso patre bellum de dominatione gessit. in quo qui aut homines ullos adiutores inuenerit aut deos inuocare ausus sit, † pare admiratione habet †.
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  37.  2
    Arsacid Beverages in Lucan.Jake Nabel - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):776-782.
    In the eighth book of Lucan's Bellum Ciuile, Pompey sends the Galatian king Deiotarus into the distant East to seek an alliance with Parthia, the vast empire beyond the Euphrates ruled by the Arsacid dynasty. His instructions to Deiotarus begin with these lines :‘quando’ ait ‘Emathiis amissus cladibus orbis,qua Romanus erat, superest, fidissime regum,Eoam temptare fidem populosque bibentisEuphraten et adhuc securum a Caesare Tigrim.’.
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  38.  1
    Sophocles in Afghanistan.S. Douglas Olson - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):898-901.
    In 1977, French excavations at Aï Khanoum in north-east Afghanistan—a foundation of Antiochus I Sotēr and subsequently one of the major cities of the Greco-Bactrian kingdom—of a building dating to shortly before the destruction of the place in 145 b.c.e. uncovered inter alia the remains of a papyrus and a parchment document. The papyrus text, dated by Cavallo on the basis of its letterforms to the mid third century b.c.e., preserved a fragment of a philosophical dialogue seemingly to be associated (...)
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  39.  4
    Sophocles’ Ball.Konstantine Panegyres - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):523-527.
    In the interpretation of fragments the omission or neglect of even the most minute detail can lead a scholar to false conclusions or to ill-founded speculations. How careful one must be to draw out every possibility and nuance from every little piece of textual evidence can be seen in the following case. This is the text of Soph. fr. 781 as quoted by a late lexicographer : ὁ δὲ Σοφοκλῆς τὴν σφαῖραν ἔγχος κέκληκεν, οἷον “τὸ δ’ ἔγχος ἐν ποσὶ κυλίνδεται”.
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  40.  2
    Nemo … Non Nostrvm Peccat (Petron. Sat. 75.1). Habinnas’ Maxim Restored.Stefano Poletti - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):921-925.
    In this short note I shall address a problem of word order in a passage of Petronius’ Cena Trimalchionis by pointing out an attractive variant in the key codex Traguriensis, which has been neglected thus far.
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  41.  1
    Did Cicero ‘Proscribe’ Marcus Antonius?John T. Ramsey - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):793-800.
    Pliny's celebration of Cicero's consular achievements contains a striking anomaly, namely the assertion that Cicero proscribed Marcus Antonius. That statement turns Cicero, the victim of Antonius’ murderous vendetta, into the one who wielded the executioner's axe, and it abruptly shifts the focus of the passage from 63 to 43 b.c. Two slight corrections to the Latin text can eliminate the intrusion of the proscriptions by substituting a reference to the control Cicero exercised in 63 over Gaius Antonius, his consular colleague (...)
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  42.  9
    Cicero Against Cassius on Pleasure and Virtue: A Complicated Passage From de Finibvs.Geert Roskam - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):725-733.
    In the first two books of De finibus, Cicero deals with the Epicurean view of the final goal of life. This philosophical discussion, which is preceded by a rhetorical proem that stands on itself, is framed as a dialogue between Torquatus, who defends the Epicurean position, Cicero, who attacks it, and Triarius, who confines himself to a few critical interventions. If philosophy starts in wonder, according to the celebrated passage from Plato's Theaetetus, the company meets this criterion admirably well, for (...)
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  43.  3
    Aristotle's Ideal City-Planning: Politics 7.12.Mor Segev - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):585-596.
    At Pol. 7.12, 1331a19–20, Aristotle states it as a matter of fact that the citizenry of the best city should be divided into ‘public messes’. His primary concern in the rest of the chapter is to uncover the optimal way in which syssitia should be organized, and the way in which they should be situated in relation to other facilities, public buildings, agorai and temples in the city. The proposed plan is roughly as follows. Syssitia would be divided into three (...)
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  44.  3
    Vice's Secret: Prodicus and the Choice of Heracles.David Sider - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):896-898.
    In a well-known parable, told by Xenophon but credited by him to the sophist Prodicus, the young Heracles setting out on the road meets two women whose appearance turns out to be in accord with their characters and names, which are soon proclaimed by each to be Virtue and Vice. The former comports herself as a proper Greek woman should, ‘becoming to look at and freeborn by nature, her body adorned with purity, her eyes with shame, her stature with moderation, (...)
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  45.  2
    Sex Can Kill: Gender Inversion and the Politics of Subversion in Aristophanes’ Ecclesiazvsae.Natalia Tsoumpra - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):528-544.
    Scholarship on Ecclesiazusae has been largely divided between those who are in favour of a fantastical/positive reading of the play and view it as a celebration of comic energy void of serious social critique, and those who argue for an ironic/satirical interpretation and deem Praxagora's plan as a spectacular failure. The unsuccessful realization of the new political programme is often regarded as a commentary on the state of democracy at the time. Other views are more affirmative of the democratic values (...)
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  46.  2
    Heraclides’ Epitome of Aristotle's Constitutions and Barbarian Customs: Two Neglected Fragments.Gertjan Verhasselt - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):672-683.
    The Aristotelian Πολιτεῖαι collected information on the history and organization of reportedly 158 city-states. Of these only the Ἀθηναίων πολιτεία survives almost in its entirety on two papyri. All that remains of the other constitutions is the epitome by Heraclides Lembus and about 130 fragments. This article will look at the transmission of Heraclides’ epitome and explore the possibility of identifying further fragments of the original text.
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  47.  2
    Nvmerosvs Horativs?A. J. Woodman - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):911-912.
    One of the most famous inscriptions to have survived from ancient Rome is the acta of the Ludi Saeculares of 17 b.c., and one of the most evocative of all epigraphic sentences occupies a line to itself : Carmen composuit Q. Horatius Flaccus. This reference to the author of the Carmen Saeculare, says Fraenkel, ‘was the result of a carefully considered decision of the highest authorities’. The degree of careful consideration is initially evident from the prominent positioning of the poet's (...)
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  48.  11
    The Skin of a Swallow: Apuleius, Metamorphoses 6.26.Evelyn Adkins - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):457-461.
    In Book 6 of Apuleius’ Metamorphoses, Lucius contemplates his possible death at the hands of the robbers. After one robber threatens to throw him off a cliff, he remarks to himself how easily such an act would kill him :‘uides istas rupinas proximas et praeacutas in his prominentes silices, quae te penetrantes antequam decideris membratim dissipabunt? nam et illa ipsa praeclara magia tua uultum laboresque tibi tantum asini, uerum corium non asini crassum, sed hirudinis tenue membranulum circumdedit. quin igitur masculum (...)
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  49.  4
    Presbyopic Corruption: Plato, Symposivm 219a.Archibald Allen - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):447-448.
    Alcibiades relates Socrates' warning on his proposal for a reciprocal exchange of beauty; he should take a better look in case he is mistaken about Socrates' beauty and true worth: ἥ τοι τῆς διανοίας ὄψις ἄρχεται ὀξὺ βλέπειν ὅταν ἡ τῶν ὀμμάτων τῆς ἀκμῆς λήγειν ἐπιχειρῆι· σὺ δὲ τούτων ἔτι πόρρω, ‘the sight of the mind, you know, begins to see sharply when the sight of the eyes attempts to fade from its prime—but you still far from these.’.
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  50.  4
    ‘The Death of Intestate Old Men’: Gilbert Highet's Paper on Juvenal 1.144.Robert J. Ball - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):363-369.
    The verse hinc subitae mortes atque intestata senectus has long fuelled considerable debate and discussion among classical scholars. This hexameter occurs in the passage of the first satire that describes the aspect of the patron-client relationship where the rich patron, ignoring the plight of his poor and hungry clients, enjoys a sumptuous but deadly feast. After dining on delicacies such as boar and peacock, he bathes on a bloated stomach, causing him to die suddenly and apparently intestate, and causing those (...)
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  51.  5
    A Fragment of Eratosthenes, on Old Comedy.Maria Broggiato - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):451-453.
    Phot. Lex. ε 100 Theodoridis: ἔγχουσαν οἱ Ἀττικοὶ λέγουσι τὴν ῥίζαν, οὐ δὴ ἄγχουσαν, ἣν ἀπείρως Ἐρατοσθένης φυκίον. Ἀμειψίας Ἀποκοτταβίζουσι· ‘δυοῖν ὀβολοῖν ἔγχουσα καὶ ψιμύθιον’.Phot. Lex. ε 100 Theodoridis: The Attic writers call the root enchusa, not anchusa, which Eratosthenes out of ignorance a seaweed. Ameipsias in the Cottabus-Players : ‘alkanet and white lead at the price of two obols’.
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  52.  2
    The Greek Ὕμνοσ: High Praise for Gods and Men.Michael E. Brumbaugh - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):167-186.
    Over a hundred instances of the word ὕμνος from extant archaic poetry demonstrate that the Greek hymn was understood broadly as a song of praise. The majority of these instances comes from Pindar, who regularly uses the term to describe his poems celebrating athletic victors. Indeed, Pindar and his contemporaries saw the ὕμνος as a powerful vehicle for praising gods, heroes, men and their achievements—often in service of an ideological agenda. Writing a century later Plato used the term frequently and (...)
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  53.  6
    The Dēmos in Dēmokratia.Daniela Cammack - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):42-61.
    The meaning of dēmokratia is widely agreed: ‘rule by the people’, where dēmos, ‘people’, implies ‘entire citizen body’, synonymous with polis, ‘city-state’, or πάντες πολίται, ‘all citizens’. Dēmos, on this understanding, comprised rich and poor, leaders and followers, mass and elite alike. As such, dēmokratia is interpreted as constituting a sharp rupture from previous political regimes. Rule by one man or by a few had meant the domination of one part of the community over the rest, but dēmokratia, it is (...)
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  54.  3
    Juvenal 5.104: Text and Intertext.Ben Cartlidge - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):370-377.
    This paper draws on Juvenal's intertextual relationship with comedy to solve a textual crux involving fish-names. The monograph by Ferriss-Hill will no doubt warn scholarship away from the treatment of Roman satire's intertextuality with Old Comedy for a time. Yet, Greek comedy's influence on Roman satire is far from exhausted, and this paper will show that this influence goes more widely, and more deeply, than is usually seen. In time, one might hope for a renewed monographic treatment of the subject.
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  55.  2
    The Presence of Legio XX in Illyricum: A Reconsideration.Nikola Cesarik - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):278-289.
    Since Sir Ronald Syme wrote a paper on the legions under Augustus, there has not been much development on the movement of legions in Illyricum before a.d. 9. The basic reference work on the matter is still J.J. Wilkes's Dalmatia; and the last considerable upgrade was made in this very journal—in the paper by Stephen Mitchell, who showed that legio VII was most probably one of the legions that Marcus Silvanus brought from Galatia to fight the Pannonians at the Volcaean (...)
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  56.  6
    Ethnography in Caesar's Gallic War and its Implications for Composition.Tyler Creer - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):246-263.
    After long neglect, in English-language scholarship at least, the question of how Julius Caesar wrote and disseminated his Gallic War—as a single work? in multi-year chunks? year by year?—was revived by T.P. Wiseman in 1998, who argued anew for serial composition. This paper endeavours to provide further evidence for that conclusion by examining how Caesar depicts the non-Roman peoples he fights. Caesar's ethnographic passages, and their authorship, have been a point of contention among German scholars for over a century, but (...)
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  57.  3
    Probable New Fragments and a Testimonium From Galen's Commentary on Plato's Timaevs.Aileen R. Das - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):384-401.
    As his writings tend to prioritize the incorporeal over the corporeal, Plato seems an unlikely authority on medicine. He does not appear to have engaged in any systematic investigation of the body through direct examination of animal anatomy, like his pupil Aristotle. Notwithstanding Plato's apparent lack of interest in anatomical research, modern scholars view his dialogues as valuable witnesses for earlier and contemporary theories about the body. Famously, the Phaedrus mentions Hippocrates’ holistic approach to studying the body. Out of all (...)
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  58.  11
    Empedocles and the Birth of Trees: Reconstructing P.Strasb. Gr. Inv. 1665–6, Ens. D–F 10b–18.Chiara Ferella - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):75-86.
    The reconstruction of ensemble d–f of the Akhmîm Papyrus, better known as the Strasbourg Papyrus, which attests approximately eighteen of the over seventy new lines of Empedocles’ physical poem, has drawn the attention of scholars over recent years. Thanks to the good condition of the papyrus and the coincidence with two Empedoclean lines, already known from the indirect tradition, ensemble d–f 1–10a presents a well-restored text and an intelligible sense. In contrast, because of the damaged state of the papyrus, the (...)
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  59.  2
    Vespasian's Apotheosis.Andrew B. Gallia - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):335-339.
    In the study of the divinization of Roman emperors, a great deal depends upon the sequence of events. According to the model of consecratio proposed by Bickermann, apotheosis was supposed to be accomplished during the deceased emperor's public funeral, after which the Senate acknowledged what had transpired by decreeing appropriate honours for the new diuus. Contradictory evidence has turned up in the Fasti Ostienses, however, which seem to indicate that both Marciana and Faustina were declared diuae before their funerals took (...)
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  60.  10
    Foreshadowing and Flashback: Childhood Anecdotes in Suetonius’ Caesars.Phoebe Garrett - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):378-383.
    Suetonius’ Lives of the Caesars contain at least twenty discrete anecdotes about childhood and youth spread across the Lives. Some characterize the Caesars by looking forwards and others do so by looking backwards. In both foreshadowing and flashback, the childhood anecdote shows continuity with the adult and creates the impression of lifelong consistency of character. The foreshadowing technique is also something other ancient biographers do; the flashback is something that appears to be unique to Suetonius. In this note I briefly (...)
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  61.  4
    Μεσοτησ in Plato's Laws 746a6–7.Roberto Grasso - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):443-446.
    In the fifth book of Plato's Laws, the Athenian stranger concedes that some requirements posed in the description of the ideal city might be unrealistically demanding. The passage quotes the due limits fixed with regard to wealth and the regulations about the number of children and the size of the family, as well as the rules to be observed in the allocation of houses in the city and in the countryside. The latter requirement is recalled at 746a6–7, where the word (...)
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  62.  4
    … Etiam Per Praeposteros Homines …: A Note on Augustine, Confessiones 9.18.Guy Guldentops - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):417-421.
    In Book 9 of his Confessions, Augustine recounts that his mother Monica told him how ‘a weakness for wine gradually got grip upon her’ as a little girl. After some time, so the story goes, God healed her from her bad habit. In this context, Augustine observes: ‘When father and mother and nurses are not there, you are present. You have created us, you call us, you use human authorities set over us to do something for the health of our (...)
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  63.  2
    Sleeping Europa From Plato Comicus to Moschus and Horace.Fotini Hadjittofi - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):264-277.
    The rape of a sleeping Europa in Plato Comicus has curiously not attracted any attention from critics commenting on later texts which narrate the story of Europa. Yet, the motifs of night, sleep and dreaming play a prominent role in the Europa poems of both Moschus and Horace. This article will investigate the role of these motifs and argue for a closer connection between these two poems than has thus far been allowed. It will also maintain that, in both poems, (...)
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  64.  6
    Winter is Coming: The Barbarization of Roman Leaders in Imperial Panegyric From A.D. 446–68.Scott Kennedy - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):422-434.
    The Ostrogothic king Theoderic I drew on his experience of ruling post-imperial Italy when he famously remarked that ‘The poor Roman imitates the Goth and the rich Goth imitates the Roman’. Written well after the fall of the western Roman empire, these words have prefaced many discussions of the process of Roman and barbarian assimilation and mutual acculturation. This topic has long captured the imagination of scholars, who have approached the topic from many different angles, such as archaeology, religion, prosopography (...)
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  65.  15
    On Not Misunderstanding Oedipus Tyrannos.David Kovacs - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):107-118.
    How are we to understand what happens to Oedipus? What or who is the cause of the terrible deeds—predicted by oracles to both Laius and Oedipus—that he has already committed before the play begins and that are revealed in its course? The purpose of the present essay, whose title alludes to a well-known article by E.R. Dodds, is to draw attention to aspects of the play that have been ignored or explained away. To give them their due it will be (...)
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  66.  4
    The Structure of Plautus’ Menaechmi.Christopher Lowe - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):214-221.
    Widely different views have been held concerning the structure of Plautus’ Menaechmi. On the one hand, the sequence of misunderstandings arising from the presence in the same city of a pair of identical twins with the same name has been likened to clockwork and attributed in essentials to an unknown Greek dramatist. On the other hand, E. Stärk has stressed features of the play which are typical of improvised comedy and put forward the bold theory that it was constructed by (...)
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  67.  9
    Plautianus' Zebras: A Roman Expedition to East Africa in the Early Third Century.C. T. Mallan - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):461-465.
    The kleptocratic supremacy of the praetorian prefect C. Fulvius Plautianus was felt throughout the city of Rome, the Empire and even beyond the imperial frontiers. Indeed, for the senatorial historian Dio Cassius, there was no more picturesque demonstration of Plautianus' acquisitiveness than his seizure of strange striped horse-like creatures from ‘islands in the Erythraean Sea’. The passage, as preserved in the text of Xiphilinus' Epitome, reads as follows : καὶ τέλος ἵππους Ἡλίῳ τιγροειδεῖς ἐκ τῶν ἐν τῇ Ἐρυθρᾷ θαλάσσῃ νήσων, (...)
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  68.  2
    What's in a Name? The Evolving Role of the Frvmentarii.Stuart McCunn - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):340-354.
    From the first century a.d. to the late third there existed a group of soldiers known as the frumentarii. Centralized in the late first century, they became an increasingly important force throughout the second century until Diocletian abolished them at the end of the third. Modern scholarship has usually seen their purpose as encompassing three roles: couriers, military police and secret police, with the last attracting the most attention.
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  69.  6
    Heliconian Nymphs, Oedipus’ Ancestry and Wilamowitz's Conjecture.Tomasz Mojsik - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):119-125.
    The third stasimon of Oedipus Rex is the climax of the play, separating the conversation with the Corinthian messenger from the interrogation of the shepherd, so crucial for the narrative. Indeed, the question τίς σε, τέκνον, τίς σ’ ἔτικτε, critical for the plot, comes right at the beginning of its antistrophe. Sophocles, however, offers no easy answer to it. Instead, he provides yet another narrative misdirection, one that—for the last time—suggests that the paths of the king of Thebes and of (...)
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  70.  12
    Natvrales Qvaestiones 4a Praef. 20 and Ep. 34.2: Approaching the Chronology and Non-Fictional Nature of Seneca's Epistvlae Morales. [REVIEW]Simone Mollea - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):319-334.
    It is undeniable that the form of Seneca's Epistulae Morales we currently read is a work of literature, literature being here defined as a piece of work the author intended to publish. What Seneca claims in Ep. 21.3–5 is clear evidence of this:exemplum Epicuri referam. cum Idomeneo scriberet et illum a uita speciosa ad fidelem stabilemque gloriam reuocaret, regiae tunc potentiae ministrum et magna tractantem, ‘si gloria’ inquit ‘tangeris, notiorem te epistulae meae facient quam omnia ista quae colis et propter (...)
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  71.  2
    Arabic Support for an Emendation of Plato, Laws 666b.Geoffrey J. Moseley - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):440-442.
    At Leg. 666b7, Burnet's emendation of the transmitted λήθην to λήθῃ has been widely accepted. Newly discovered support for this emendation comes from an Arabic version or adaptation of Plato's Laws, most likely Galen's Synopsis, quoted by the polymath Abū-Rayḥān al-Bīrūnī as Kitāb al-Nawāmīs li-Aflāṭun in his ethnographic work on India. I transliterate and translate the passage below, proposing two incidental emendations to the Arabic:wa-qāla l-aṯīniyyu fī l-maqālati l-tāniyati mina l-kitābi: lammā raḥima [sic pro raḥimati] l-ālihatu ǧinsa l-bašari min aǧli (...)
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  72.  2
    Sositheus and His ‘New’ Satyr Play.Sebastiana Nervegna - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):202-213.
    Active in Alexandria during the second half of the third century, Dioscorides is the author of some forty epigrams preserved in the Anthologia Palatina. Five of these epigrams are concerned with Greek playwrights: three dramatists of the archaic and classical periods, Thespis, Aeschylus and Sophocles, and two contemporary ones, Sositheus and Machon. Dioscorides conceived four epigrams as two pairs clearly marked by verbal connections, and celebrates each playwright for his original contribution to the history of Greek drama. Thespis boasts to (...)
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  73.  1
    Mutilating Demipho in Plautus’ Mercator.Shawn O'bryhim - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):453-455.
    In Plautus’ Mercator, the senex amator Demipho lusts after the slave girl Pasicompsa, who is the lover of his son Charinus. Demipho knows nothing about their relationship. He believes that Charinus bought Pasicompsa as a present for his mother while he was trading on Rhodes. In an attempt to gain access to her, Demipho enlists the aid of his elderly neighbour, Lysimachus, who taunts him for his infatuation with such a young woman. Eager to persuade Lysimachus that he is truly (...)
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  74.  3
    Menelaus’ Wound.Ellen Oliensis - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):35-41.
    The focus of this note is the simile attached to Menelaus’ wound in Iliad 4 and its Virgilian transformation in Aeneid 12. My goal is to flesh out and specify the sense of the Homeric simile; as the parentheses in my title suggest, I call upon Virgil chiefly as a fellow-interpreter. Since an important part of my argument is that the simile only takes on its full significance when considered in its narrative context, I begin by setting the scene.
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  75.  8
    The Rhetoric of Religious Conflict in Arnobius’ Adversvs Nationes.Konstantine Panegyres - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):402-416.
    In this paper I discuss the ways in which the early Christian writer Arnobius of Sicca used rhetoric to shape religious identity in Aduersus nationes. I raise questions about the reliability of his rhetorical work as a historical source for understanding conflict between Christians and pagans. The paper is intended as an addition to the growing literature in the following current areas of study: the role of local religion and identity in the Roman Empire; the presence of pagan elements in (...)
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  76.  3
    Herodotus 6.105.2.Davide Paolillo - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):438-439.
    This is the text of Hdt. 6.105.1–2, as printed by the most recent editors, Wilson and Hornblower–Pelling: καὶ πρῶτα μὲν ἐόντες ἔτι ἐν τῷ ἄστεϊ οἱ στρατηγοὶ ἀποπέμπουσι ἐς Σπάρτην κήρυκα Φιλιππίδην, Ἀθηναῖον μὲν ἄνδρα, ἄλλως δὲ ἡμεροδρόμην τε καὶ τοῦτο μελετῶντα· τῷ δή, ὡς αὐτός γε ἔλεγε Φιλιππίδης καὶ Ἀθηναίοισι ἀπήγγελλε, περὶ τὸ Παρθένιον ὄρος τὸ ὑπὲρ Τεγέης ὁ Πὰν περιπίπτει· βώσαντα δὲ τὸ οὔνομα τοῦ Φιλιππίδεω τὸν Πᾶνα Ἀθηναίους κελεῦσαι ἐπειρωτῆσαι, δι᾽ ὅ τι ἑωυτοῦ οὐδεμίαν ἐπιμελείαν ποιεῦνται, ἐόντος (...)
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  77.  12
    Embryology, Female Semina and Male Vincibility in Lucretius, de Rervm Natvra.Michael Pope - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):229-245.
    In a poem setting forth the way things are in nature, it is fitting for Lucretius to address, among many other phenomena, human conception and embryonic determination. With an eye toward ethics, Lucretius demonstrates how sexual reproduction at the seminal level can be explained by Epicurean atomism. In this paper, I am concerned with the biological ‘how’ of conception as explained in De Rerum Natura but also with the ethical ‘therefore’ for Lucretius’ readership and estimations of male autonomy. For modern (...)
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  78.  4
    New Fragments From Rufus of Ephesus’ on Melancholy (24a–D) and on Preferring Fresh Poppies.P. E. Pormann - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):355-362.
    Rufus of Ephesus wrote a large body of works on a variety of medical topics. Generally speaking, the Arabic tradition is particularly important for the reconstruction of much of his œuvre. In the present article, I am going to present four new fragments of Rufus’ On Melancholy and a fragment from an otherwise unknown monograph On Preferring Fresh Poppies. These new fragments provide fascinating new insights into Rufus’ approach to recording case histories.
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  79.  2
    A Delicate Bridegroom: Habrosunē in Sappho, Fr. 115v.Giuliana Ragusa & Patricia A. Rosenmeyer - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):62-74.
    In Sappho's two-line fragment 115V, an unidentified speaker addresses a lucky bridegroom, wondering how best to describe him; the answer follows immediately:τίῳ σ᾿, ὦ φίλε γάμβρε, καλῶς ἐικάσδω;ὄρπακι βραδίνῳ σε μάλιστ᾿ ἐικάσδω.Dear bridegroom, to what do I best compare you?I compare you most of all to a delicate branch.
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  80.  4
    Cicero Belts Aratus: The Bilingual Acrostic at Aratea 317–20.Evelyn Patrick Rick - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):222-228.
    That Cicero as a young didactic poet embraced the traditions of Hellenistic hexameter poetry is well recognized. Those traditions encompass various forms of wordplay, one of which is the acrostic. Cicero's engagement with this tradition, in the form of an unusual Greek-Latin acrostic at Aratea 317–20, prompts inquiry regarding both the use of the acrostic technique as textual commentary and Cicero's lifelong concerns regarding translation.
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  81.  11
    Looking Edgeways. Pursuing Acrostics in Ovid and Virgil.Matthew Robinson - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):290-308.
    What follows is an experiment in reading practice. I propose that we read some key passages of the Aeneid and the Metamorphoses in the active pursuit of acrostics and telestics, just as we have been accustomed to read them in the active pursuit of allusions and intertexts; and that we do so with the same willingness to make sense of what we find. The measure of success of this reading practice will be the extent to which our understanding of these (...)
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  82.  96
    Untying the Gorgianic ‘Not’: Argumentative Structure in on Not-Being.Evan Rodriguez - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):87-106.
    Gorgias’ On Not-Being survives only in two divergent summaries. Diels–Kranz's classic edition prints the better-preserved version that appears in Sextus’ Aduersus Mathematicos. Yet, in recent years there has been rising interest in a second summary that survives as part of the anonymous De Melisso, Xenophane, Gorgia. The text of MXG is more difficult; it contains substantial lacunae that often make it much harder to make grammatical let alone philosophical sense of. As Alexander Mourelatos reports, one manuscript has a scribal note (...)
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  83.  6
    The Terminology for Beauty in the Iliad and the Odyssey.Hugo Shakeshaft - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):1-22.
    An ancient Greek proverb declares: ‘beautiful things are difficult’. One obvious difficulty arises from their almost limitless variety: sights, sounds, people, natural phenomena, man-made objects and abstract ideas may all be beautiful, but what do these things have in common? It is not just beauty's breadth of application, then, that makes it difficult, but the way in which its meaning varies depending on context. The beauty of a child may mean something quite different from the beauty of an old and (...)
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  84.  2
    A Note on the ‘New Apuleius’.Mikhail Shumilin - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):456-457.
    Lines 3.20–2 of the text published by Justin Stover as Apuleius’ De Platone 3 are printed by him as follows: improbat deinde eos qui negantis homines in seruitute habeant aut qui omnino eiusdem ciuitatis nationem belli iure diruant aut qui hostium spolia deorum aedibus adfigant.He [sc. Plato] then rebukes those who hold people in slavery against their will, or else who destroy utterly the people of that same city by right of war, or who hang the spoils of enemies on (...)
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  85.  2
    Aristotle's Ethica Evdemia: The Text and Character of the Common Books as Found in Eth. Evd. Mss.Peter L. P. Simpson - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):187-201.
    Aristotle's Ethica Eudemia and Ethica Nicomachea, as is well known and much discussed, contain three books in common. Less well known, at least until Dieter Harlfinger alerted scholars to the fact in 1971, is that some of the manuscripts of Eth. Eud. do, contrary to the then prevailing consensus, contain the text of these common books. Even less well known is that Harlfinger's discovery was anticipated some 50 years before by Walter Ashburner, who had uncovered this fact about Eth. Eud. (...)
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  86.  1
    A Sense of Loxias: Bacchylides 16.1.Marios Skempis - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):435-438.
    Bacchylides 16 is a hybrid poem. It sets out to explore the relation of cognate types of choral song, the paean and the dithyramb, in one and the same narrative. To that end, it poses a ritual section, which deals with Apollo's stop by the banks of the river Hebrus on his way back from the Hyperboreans to Delphi, ahead of a mythic section whose thematic spine focusses on the aftermath of Oechalia's sack by Heracles and his marital crisis with (...)
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  87.  11
    Pleasure and the Divided Soul in Plato's Republic Book 9.Brooks Sommerville - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):147-166.
    In Book 9 of Plato's Republic we find three proofs for the claim that the just person is happier than the unjust person. Curiously, Socrates does not seem to consider these arguments to be coequal when he announces the third and final proof as ‘the greatest and most decisive of the overthrows’. This remark raises a couple of related questions for the interpreter. Whatever precise sense we give to μέγιστον and κυριώτατον in this passage, Socrates is clearly appealing to an (...)
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  88.  12
    Sophistry and the Promethean Crafts in Plato's Protagoras.Brooks Sommerville - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):126-146.
    The Protagoras is a contest of philosophical methods. With its mix of μῦθος and λόγος, Protagoras’ Great Speech stands as a competing model of philosophical discourse to the Socratic elenchus. While the mythical portion of the speech clearly impresses its audience—Socrates included—one of its central claims appears to pass undefended. This is the claim that the political art cannot be distributed within a community as the technical arts are. This apparent shortcoming of the Great Speech does not seem to trouble (...)
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  89.  2
    The Faber and the Saga. Pygmalion Between the Ebvrnea Virgo and the Trvncvs Iners.Viola Starnone - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):309-318.
    Approaching the Ovidian story of Pygmalion, scholars mainly focus on the moment in which the artist carves his ideal woman out of ivory. But the reasons that led him to sculpt the statue tend to remain in the background. Ovid informs us that, before giving to ebur the shape of a uirgo, the ‘Paphian hero’, shocked by the lascivious conduct of the Propoetides, had declared war on the whole of womankind :sunt tamen obscenae Venerem Propoetides ausaeesse negare deam; pro quo (...)
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  90.  4
    Tippling but Not Toppling: Eubulus, Pcg Fr. 123.Oliver Thomas - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):448-450.
    The epitome of Athenaeus does not retain all the details of how these comic fragments were embedded in the conversation which Athenaeus originally presented, though the extract's first sentence shows that one purpose was to exemplify the application of βρέχω to drinking. Editors of both Athenaeus and Eubulus have left the connection of the latter's fragment to its conversational context at that. I submit that what follows in the epitome, as well as what precedes, casts light both on that connection (...)
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  91.  2
    Glory and Nostos: The Ship-Epithet Κοιλοσ in the Iliad.Matthew Ward - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):23-34.
    In the Iliad the Achaean ships play a prominent role in the narrative; they are foregrounded as Achilles sits by his vessels in anger and threatens to sail home; as the Trojans come close to burning them; and as Hector's body lies by Achilles’ ships until ransomed. Where not in the foreground, the ships remain a consistent background; without them the Achaeans would not have reached Troy; they are an essential component of the Greek encampment; and are the unrealized potential (...)
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