Year:

  1.  10
    Personification Without Impossible Content.Craig Bourne & Emily Caddick Bourne - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):165-179.
    Personification has received little philosophical attention, but Daniel Nolan has recently argued that it has important ramifications for the relationship between fictional representation and possibility. Nolan argues that personification involves the representation of metaphysically impossible identities, which is problematic for anyone who denies that fictions can have impossible content. We develop an account of personification which illuminates how personification enhances engagement with fiction, without need of impossible content. Rather than representing an identity, personification is something that is done with representations—a (...)
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  2.  2
    Gombrich Among the Egyptians and Other Essays in the History of Art.Susan Bush - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):215-218.
    Gombrich among the Egyptians and Other Essays in the History of ArtBagleyRobertMarquand Books. 2015. pp. 207. £38.50.
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  3. Journal of Scottish Thought. Volume 7. Francis Hutcheson and the Origins of the Aesthetic.Botond Csuka - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):218-221.
    Journal of Scottish Thought. Volume 7. Francis Hutcheson and the Origins of the AestheticSZÉCSÉNYIENDREthe university of aberdeen press. 2016. pp. 212. £10.00.
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  4.  73
    Expressivism and Arguing About Art.Daan Evers - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):181-191.
    Peter Kivy claims that expressivists in aesthetics cannot explain why we argue about art. The situation would be different in the case of morals. Moral attitudes lead to action, and since actions affect people, we have a strong incentive to change people’s moral attitudes. This can explain why we argue about morals, even if moral language is expressive of our feelings. However, judgements about what is beautiful and elegant need not significantly affect our lives. So why be concerned with other (...)
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  5.  2
    Olfaction and Space in the Theatre.Susan L. Feagin - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):131-146.
    My general topic is whether limitations in olfaction’s conceptual and generally mental capabilities hinder its suitability for playing significant and sophisticated roles in theatrical productions of the standard narrative type. This is a big question and I only scratch the surface here. I begin with a brief look at smell’s most prominent roles in the theatre, as illustration and to evoke mood and atmosphere. Next, I consider the relation between smell and the experience of space, looking first at a kind (...)
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  6.  7
    Notions of the Aesthetic and of Aesthetics: Essays on Art, Aesthetics and Culture.Göran Hermerén - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):212-215.
    Notions of the Aesthetic and of Aesthetics: Essays on Art, Aesthetics and CultureÅhlbergLars-OlofPeter Lang. 2014. pp. 427. £60.00.
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  7.  6
    Visuality and Aesthetic Formalism.Branko Mitrović - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):147-163.
    In the philosophy and psychology of perception there exists a long-standing debate about the detachability of the visual from the conceptual contents of perception. The article analyses the implications of this dilemma for the attribution of aesthetic properties independent of the classification of aesthetic objects and the possibility of aesthetic formalism.
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  8.  14
    Wollheim, Wittgenstein, and Pictorial Representation. Seeing-as and Seeing-In. [REVIEW]Matteo Ravasio - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):209-212.
    Wollheim, Wittgenstein, and Pictorial Representation. Seeing-as and Seeing-in KempGary and MrasGabriel M. Routledge. 2016. pp. 308. £110.00.
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  9.  10
    Fake Views—or Why Concepts Are Bad Guides to Art’s Ontology.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):193-207.
    It is often thought that the boundaries and properties of art-kinds are determined by the things we say and think about them. More recently, this tendency has manifested itself as concept-descriptivism, the view that the reference of art-kind terms is fixed by the ontological properties explicitly or implicitly ascribed to art and art-kinds by competent users of those terms. Competent users are therefore immune from radical error in their ascriptions; the result is that the ontology of art must begin and (...)
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  10.  3
    Jean-Baptiste Du Bos’ Critical Reflections on Poetry and Painting and Hume’s Treatise.James O. Young & Margaret Cameron - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):119-130.
    It has long been known that Jean-Baptiste Du Bos exercised a considerable influence on Hume’s essays and, in particular, on the ‘Of the Standard of Taste’ and ‘Of Tragedy’. It has also been noted that some passages in the Treatise bear marks of Du Bos’ influence. In this essay, we identify many more passages in the Treatise that bear unmistakable signs of Du Bos’ influence. We demonstrate that Du Bos certainly had a significant impact on Hume as he wrote the (...)
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  11.  18
    ‘It’s Just a Story’: Pornography, Desire, and the Ethics of Fictive Imagining.Christopher Bartel & Anna Cremaldi - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):37-50.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comIn the popular media, morally problematic content is often defended on the grounds that ‘it’s just a story’—that is, imaginative engagement with morally problematic content amounts merely to entertaining a story, and there is nothing morally wrong with entertaining a story. Against this, some aestheticians have argued that, in fact, there can be something intrinsically (...)
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  12.  14
    Body Aesthetics.Aili Bresnahan - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):111-113.
    £ British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comThis unique and sprawling collection of sixteen essays explores a wide range of perspectives on the human body and how it is embodied, lived, viewed, perceived, and constructed by ourselves and by others in both positive and harmful ways. The book’s contributors include philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists, and artists, as well as scholars who focus on (...)
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  13.  16
    ‘Nothing but Nonsense’: A Kantian Account of Ugliness.Matthew Coate - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):51-70.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comWhat does it mean for a thing to be ugly, or perhaps better, for something to be judged as such? We should admit that the matter is not transparent. Maybe that seems odd, since we find things ugly all the time; should not this be plain as day, then? But usually, it is what seems (...)
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  14.  32
    The Value of Fidelity in Adaptation.James Harold - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):89-100.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comThe adaptation of literary works into films has been almost completely neglected as a philosophical topic. I discuss two questions about this phenomenon:What do we mean when we say that a film is faithful to its source?Is being faithful to its source a merit in a film adaptation?In response to, I set out two distinct (...)
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  15.  3
    Emotional Intimacy in Literature BSA Prize Essay, 2016.John Holliday - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):1-16.
    When reading literature, we might have an emotional connection with the author, or at least what appears to be such, even when that literature is a work of fiction. But it is unclear how a work of fictional literature could supply the resources for such an experience. It is, after all, a work of fiction, not a report of the author’s experience, as with memoir or autobiography. The task of this paper is twofold: first, to explain the nature and value (...)
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  16.  23
    Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature.Yuuki Ohta - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):101-105.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comThis is an ambitious and wide-ranging book. Here are some of its central claims. Human life is pervaded by ‘organized activities’, which are activities in which human agents interact with the environment and other agents, sometimes deliberatively but more typically semi-automatically, yet always intelligently and responsively, exercising the cognitive powers such agents are naturally endowed (...)
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  17.  5
    Nahlowsky’s Psychological Aesthetics.David Romand - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):17-36.
    My article aims to revisit the aesthetic thought of the Austrian psychologist and philosopher Joseph Wilhelm Nahlowsky, as expounded in his formerly famous monograph Das Gefühlsleben. I show that although Nahlowsky was a direct heir of Herbart, his ideas were in keeping with both the contemporary debate about form and content and the then-emerging paradigm of psychological aesthetics. I describe his developments on aesthetic feelings and his remarkable attempt to elaborate a general psycho-affective theory on the experience of the aesthetic (...)
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  18.  10
    Appearance and History: The Autographic/Allographic Distinction Revisited.Enrico Terrone - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):71-87.
    Nelson Goodman notoriously distinguished between autographic works, whose instances should be identified by taking history of production into account, and allographic works, whose instances can be identified independently of history of production. Scholars such as Jerrold Levinson, Flint Schier, and Gregory Currie have criticized Goodman’s autographic/allographic distinction arguing that all works are such that their instances should be identified by taking history of production into account. I will address this objection by exploiting David Davies’ distinction between e-instances and p-instances of (...)
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  19.  6
    Eat This Book: A Carnivore’s ManifestoTaste as Experience. The Philosophy and Aesthetics of Food.Melissa Thériault - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):108-111.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comThese two books contribute, each in a very different way, to the reflection on a timeless subject: eating. While Eat This Book deals with a polemic subject, Taste as Experience focuses on the general experience of the simple act of eating and drinking and how this contributes to philosophical reflection. These questions are far from (...)
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  20.  5
    Excellent Beauty: The Naturalness of Religion and the Unnaturalness of the World.Sophia Vasalou - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):105-108.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comAnyone who follows the debates between religion and science will be instantly baited by the subject of this book and by the seductive terms of its title. This is a book about a well-worn topic which proposes to enter it through a little-worn door, the notion of mystery, for which the title’s ‘excellent beauty’ turns (...)
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