Year:

  1.  6
    The Dissonance of Modernity: On Baudelaire and Adorno.Joseph Acquisto - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):101-114.
    This essay considers 'modern' poetry and music as interrelated signifying practices in the works of Charles Baudelaire and Theodor Adorno through a focus on their approach to understanding dissonance. For Baudelaire, dissonance depends on consonance in order to be perceived at all, a fact which allows us to read the modern not just in terms of a break with the past but also as dependent on it. This essay demonstrates the mutually constitutive nature of consonance and dissonance by placing Baudelaire (...)
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  2.  3
    Elusive Fictional Truth.Craig Bourne & Emily Caddick Bourne - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):15-31.
    We argue that some fictional truths are fictionally true by default. We also argue that these fictional truths are subject to being undermined. We propose that the context within which we are to evaluate what is fictionally true changes when a possibility which was previously ignorable is brought to attention. We argue that these cases support a model of fictional truth which makes the conversational dynamics of determining truth in fiction structurally akin to the conversational dynamics of knowledge-ascription, as this (...)
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  3.  14
    Novel Assertions: A Reply to Mahon.Daisy Dixon - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):115-124.
    In a recent paper, James Edwin Mahon argues that literary artworks—novels in particular—never lie because they do not assert. In this discussion note, I reject Mahon’s conclusion that novels never lie. I argue that a central premiss in his argument—that novels do not contain assertions—is false. Mahon’s account underdetermines the content of literary works; novels have rich layers of content and can contain what I call ‘profound’ assertions, and ‘background’ assertions. I submit that Mahon therefore fails to establish that novels (...)
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  4.  6
    Ars Erotica: Sex and Somaesthetics in the Classical Arts of Love.Andrew Edgar - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):143-146.
    SHUSTERMANRICHARDCambridge University Press. 2021. pp. xvi+420. £23.
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  5.  5
    Corrigendum To: 100 × Congo: A Century of Congolese Art in Antwerp.Kris Goffin - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):157-157.
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  6.  9
    The Heart of Classical Work-Performance.Andrew Kania - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):125-141.
    In this critical study of Julian Dodd’s Being True to Works of Music, I argue that the three-tier normative profile of the work-performance tradition in classical music that Dodd defends should be rejected in favour of a two-tier version. I also argue that the theory of work-performance defended in the book fits much more naturally with a contextualist ontology of musical works than with the Platonist ontology Dodd defends in Works of Music, despite his arguments to the contrary in the (...)
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  7. Learning to Imagine.Amy Kind - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):33-48.
    Underlying much current work in philosophy of imagination is the assumption that imagination is a skill. This assumption seems to entail not only that facility with imagining will vary from one person to another, but also that people can improve their own imaginative capacities and learn to be better imaginers. This paper takes up this issue. After showing why this is properly understood as a philosophical question, I discuss what it means to say that one imagining is better than another (...)
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  8.  7
    On the Relative Unimportance of Aesthetic Value in Evaluating Visual Arts.Tomas Kulka - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):63-79.
    Contrary to the received view according to which the value of works of art consists exclusively or primarily in their aesthetic value I argue that the importance of aesthetic value has been grossly overrated. In earlier publications I have shown that the assumption stipulating that the value of artworks consists exclusively in their aesthetic value is demonstrably wrong. I have suggested a conceptual distinction between the aesthetic and the artistic value arguing that when it comes to evaluation the artistic value, (...)
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  9.  26
    Art Concept Pluralism Undermines the Definitional Project.P. D. Magnus & Christy Mag Uidhir - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):81-84.
    This discussion note addresses Caleb Hazelwood’s ‘Practice-Centered Pluralism and a Disjunctive Theory of Art’. Hazelwood advances a disjunctive definition of art on the basis of an analogy with species concept pluralism in the philosophy of biology. We recognize the analogy between species and art, we applaud attention to practice, and we are bullish on pluralism—but it is a mistake to take these as the basis for a disjunctive definition.
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  10.  10
    Everyone Can Change a Musical Work.Caterina Moruzzi - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):1-13.
    This paper explores how a new theory on the ontology of musical works, Musical Stage Theory, can address the problem of change in musical works. A natural consequence of the ontological framework of this theory is that musical works change intrinsically through a change in the sonic-structural properties of performances. From this a surprising consequence follows: everyone can change a musical work. Still, it seems that some changes matter more than others. The article offers a revisionary reply to this concern (...)
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  11.  10
    Feeling Fit For Function: Haptic Touch and Aesthetic Experience.Tom Roberts - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):49-61.
    Traditionally, the sense of touch—alongside the senses of taste and smell—has been excluded from the aesthetic domain. These proximal modalities are thought to deliver only sensory pleasures, not the complex, world-directed perceptual states that characterize aesthetic experience. In this paper, I argue that this tradition fails to recognize the perceptual possibilities of haptic touch, which allows us to experience properties of the objects with which we make bodily contact, including their weight, shape, solidity, elasticity, and smoothness. These features, moreover, may (...)
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  12.  13
    The Poem as Icon: A Study in Aesthetic Cognition. [REVIEW]Karen Simecek - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):146-149.
    The Poem as Icon: A Study in Aesthetic Cognition FREEMANMARGARET H.oup. 2020. pp. 216. £64.00.
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  13.  2
    Poetry, Painting, Park. Goethe and Claude Lorrain.Zoltán Somhegyi - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):149-151.
    Poetry, painting, park. Goethe and Claude Lorrain KempfFranz R.legenda. 2020. pp. 260. £75. hbk.
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  14.  10
    The Audience Effect. On the Collective Cinema Experience.Enrico Terrone - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):151-154.
    The Audience Effect. On the Collective Cinema Experience HANICHJULIAN edinburgh university press. 2017. pp. 256. £19.99.
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  15.  12
    Portraits, Facial Perception, and Aspect-Seeing.Andreas Vrahimis - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):85–100.
    Is there a substantial difference between a portrait depicting the sitter’s face made by an artist and an image captured by a machine able to simulate the neuro-physiology of facial perception? Drawing on the later Wittgenstein, this paper answers this question by reference to the relation between seeing a visual pattern as (i) a series of shapes and colours, and (ii) a face with expressions. In the case of the artist, and not of the machine, the portrait’s creative process involves (...)
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