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  1.  12
    Erotic Art as Proprioceptive Art.Jiri Benovsky - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):247-258.
    The philosophical discussion about erotic art has often been understood in terms of the possibility of erotic art as a form of visual or auditory art. In this article, I focus on erotic experiences qua proprioceptive experiences and I defend the claim that, under the right circumstances, such experiences can bring about proprioceptive artworks.
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  2.  8
    Human Flourishing, Liberal Theory, and the Arts. [REVIEW]Michalle Gal - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):262-266.
    Human Flourishing, Liberal Theory, and the ArtsMAUTNERMENACHEM routledge. 2018. pp. 198. £125.
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  3.  9
    Aesthetic Experience and the Unfathomable: A Pragmatist Critique of Hermeneutic Aesthetics.Mark Gilks - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):185-198.
    In his attack on the notion of immediate experience, Hans-Georg Gadamer argues that aesthetic experience should be absorbed into hermeneutics because alone it cannot account for the historical nature of experience ; predicated on an ontological theory of art, the unfathomable, therefore, is the sense we have of these infinite hermeneutic depths. I argue that this account is methodologically and existentially unacceptable: methodologically because it is overly speculative, and existentially because it betrays authentic existence. I critique Gadamer from the perspective (...)
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  4.  9
    Practice-Centered Pluralism and a Disjunctive Theory of Art.Caleb Hazelwood - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):213-227.
    In this paper, I argue that ‘art’, though an open concept, is not undefinable. I propose a particular kind of definition, a disjunctive definition, which comprises extant theories of art. I co-opt arguments from the philosophy of science, likening the concept ‘art’ to the concept ‘species’, to argue that we ought to be theoretical pluralists about art. That is, there are a number of legitimate, perhaps incompatible, criteria for a theory of art. In this paper, I consider three: functionalist definitions, (...)
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  5.  15
    Art and Objects.Branko Mitrović - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):269-272.
    Art and ObjectsHARMANGRAHAM polity. 2020. pp. 204. £16.54.
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  6.  67
    Let’s Be Liberal: An Alternative to Aesthetic Hedonism.Antonia Peacocke - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):163-183.
    Aesthetic value empiricism claims that the aesthetic value of an object is grounded in the value of a certain kind of experience of it. The most popular version of value empiricism, and a dominant view in contemporary philosophical aesthetics more generally, is aesthetic hedonism. Hedonism restricts the grounds of aesthetic value to the pleasure enjoyed in the right kind of experience. But hedonism does not enjoy any clear advantage over a more permissive alternative version of value empiricism. This alternative is (...)
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  7.  16
    The Philosophy of Rhythm: Aesthetics, Music, Poetics.Matteo Ravasio - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):262-269.
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  8.  10
    Natural Beauty, Reflective Judgment and Kant’s Aesthetic Humanism.Anthony Savile - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):199-211.
    Kant’s concern for the universal validity of aesthetic judgment turns on its providing a needed bridge between our understanding of the world as governed by mechanical laws and our ability freely to realize our true humanity. That obliges us to find beauty in nature that is expressive of our ethical and moral values. It shapes the way we should understand aesthetic judgment itself.
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  9.  24
    A Two-Tiered Theory of the Sublime.Sandra Shapshay - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):123-143.
    By the start of the twenty-first century, the notion of ‘the sublime’ had come to seem incoherent. In the last ten years or so considerable light has been shed by empirical psychologists on a related notion of ‘awe’, and a fruitful dialogue between aestheticians and empirical psychologists has ensued. It is the aim of this paper to synthesize these advances and to offer what I call a ‘two-tiered’ theory of the sublime that shows it to be a coherent aesthetic category. (...)
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  10.  9
    Supervenience and Realization: Aesthetic Objects and Their Properties.Michael Watkins - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):229-245.
    Aestheticians generally agree that the aesthetic features of an object depend upon the non-aesthetic features of an object, and that this dependence can be captured by some formulation of the supervenience relation. I argue that the aesthetic depends upon the non-aesthetic in various and importantly different ways; that these dependence relations cannot be explained by supervenience; that appeals to supervenience create puzzles that aestheticians have neither fully appreciated nor resolved; and that appealing to various realization relations avoids these puzzles and (...)
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  11.  9
    Artemisia.C. A. York - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):259-262.
    The National Gallery, London. 3 October 2020–24 January 2021.
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  12.  7
    Self-Location in Interactive Fiction.Paal Fjeldvig Antonsen - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):41-52.
    The aim of this paper is to make sense of a characteristic feature of interactive fictions, such as video game fictions, adventure books and role playing games. In particular, I describe one important way consumers of interactive fiction ‘take on the role’ of a fictional character and are ‘involved’ in the story. I argue that appreciative engagement with such works requires imagining being someone else and imagining parts of the story in a self-locating manner. In short, consuming works of interactive (...)
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  13. Relativism and the Metaphysics of Value.Daan Evers - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1).
    I argue that relativists about aesthetic and other evaluative language face some of the same objections as non-naturalists in ethics. These objections concern the metaphysics required to make it work. Unlike contextualists, relativists believe that evaluative propositions are not about the relation in which things stand to certain standards. Nevertheless, the truth of such propositions would depend on variable standards. I argue that relativism requires the existence of states of affairs very different from other things known to exist. Furthermore, there (...)
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  14.  8
    Herder’s Naturalist Aesthetics. [REVIEW]Naomi Fisher - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):115-118.
    Herder’s Naturalist AestheticsZUCKERTRACHEL Cambridge University Press. 2019. pp. 276. £75.00.
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  15.  6
    Rethinking Role Realism.Daniela Glavaničová - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):59-74.
    Role realism is a promising realist theory of fictional names. Different versions of this theory have been suggested by Gregory Currie, Peter Lamarque, Stein Haugom Olsen, and Nicholas Wolterstorff. The general idea behind the approach is that fictional characters are to be analysed in terms of roles, which in turn can be understood as sets of properties. I will discuss several advantages and disadvantages of this approach. I will then propose a novel hyperintensional version of role realism, according to which (...)
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  16.  6
    Bacon and the Mind: Art, Neuroscience and Psychology (Francis Bacon Studies I)Francis Bacon: Painting, Philosophy, Psychoanalysis.Martin Hammer - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):111-114.
    BACON AND THE MIND: ART, NEUROSCIENCE AND PSYCHOLOGY. HarrisonMartin. Thames & Hudson. 2019. pp 160. £28.00.
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  17.  3
    Reflective and Non-Reflective Aesthetic Ideas in Kant’s Theory of Art.Mojca Kuplen - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):1-16.
    The aim of this paper is to resolve some of the inconsistencies within Kant’s theory of aesthetic ideas that have been left unaddressed by previous interpretations. Specifically, Kant’s text appears to be imbued with the following two tensions. First, there appears to be a conflict between his commitment to the view that mere sensations cannot function as vehicles for the communication of aesthetic ideas and his claim that musical tones, on account of being mere sensations, can express aesthetic ideas. Second, (...)
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  18.  22
    Schiller on Freedom and Aesthetic Value: Part II.Samantha Matherne & Nick Riggle - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):17-40.
    In his Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man, Friedrich Schiller draws a striking connection between aesthetic value and individual and political freedom, claiming that, ‘it is only through beauty that man makes his way to freedom’. However, contemporary ways of thinking about freedom and aesthetic value make it difficult to see what the connection could be. Through a careful reconstruction of the Letters, we argue that Schiller’s theory of aesthetic value serves as the key to understanding not only his (...)
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  19. ‘Andy Warhol’, Tate Modern, London, 12 March – 15 November 2020; Then Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 12 December 2020 – 18 April 2021. [REVIEW]Vid Simoniti - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):107-109.
    ‘Andy Warhol’, Tate Modern, London, 12 March – 15 November 2020; then Museum Ludwig, Cologne, 12 December 2020 – 18 April 2021.
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  20.  2
    Jane Austen’s Emma: Philosophical Perspectives.Kathryn Sutherland - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):109-111.
    Jane Austen’s Emma : Philosophical PerspectivesDADLEZE. M. oup. 2018. pp. xvi + 246. £19.99.
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  21.  22
    Relativism and the Metaphysics of Value: A Comment on Daan Evers.Crispin Wright - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):89-106.
    Daan Evers argues that relativists about aesthetic and other types of evaluative language face some distinctive and largely overlooked metaphysical difficulties concerning the nature of the states of affairs that such statements are intended to be about. These difficulties, as Evers notes, all rest on the assumption that evaluative language is representational. Evers takes it that it is only on this assumption that evaluative relativism is distinguished from expressivism. I argue that this is incorrect and that, without falling into some (...)
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