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  1. Three Methods of Ethics.Marcia Baron, Philip Pettit & Michael Slote - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):721-723.
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  2.  12
    Ethical and Religious Thought in Analytic Philosophy of Language.Panayot Butchvarov - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):732-735.
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  3.  4
    The Legacy of Nelson Goodman.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):679-690.
    Nelson Goodman was one of the soaring figures of twentieth century philosophy. His work radically reshaped the subject, forcing fundamental reconceptions of philosophy’s problems, ends, and means. Goodman not only contributed to diverse fields, from philosophy of language to aesthetics, from philosophy of science to mereology, his works cut across these and other fields, revealing shared features and connecting links that narrowly focused philosophers overlook. That the author of The Structure of Appearance also wrote Languages of Art is not in (...)
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  4.  10
    Freud and the Question of Pseudoscience, by Frank Cioffi. [REVIEW]Edward Erwin - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):730-732.
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  5.  11
    A Subject with No Object: Strategies for Nominalistic Interpretation of Mathematics.Thomas Hofweber - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):723-727.
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  6.  15
    Phenomenology and Nonconceptual Content.Christopher Peacocke - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):609-615.
    This note aims to clarify which arguments do, and which arguments do not, tell against Conceptualism, the thesis that the representational content of experience is exclusively conceptual. Contrary to Sean Kelly's position, conceptualism has no difficulty accommodating the phenomena of color constancy and of situation-dependence. Acknowledgment of nonconceptual content is also consistent with holding that experiences have nonrepresentational subjective features. The crucial arguments against conceptualism stem from animal perception, and from a distinction, elaborated in the final section of the paper, (...)
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  7.  4
    My Quarrels with Nelson Goodman.Israel Scheffler - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):665-677.
    Anyone familiar with Nelson Goodman’s philosophical career knows that to have quarreled with him was a hazardous enterprise. For aside from his creative brilliance and analytical subtlety, he was also one of the foremost dialecticians of the age. Seeing through the flaws of rival views and rebutting putative counterarguments to his own came as easily to him as breathing. To recall his rejoinders to a long list of would-be rebuttals of his paper, “On Likeness of Meaning”, or the acute series (...)
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  8.  10
    Vision and Cognition in Picture Perception.Robert Schwartz - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):707-719.
    In recent papers [1997, in press] I have explored how two seemingly conflicting paradigms inform the conception and study of picture perception. The dominant paradigm, one especially favored by vision theorists, claims that seeing a pictorial representation of an object is, with qualifications, like seeing the object itself. The picture, being a geometrically sanctioned projection of its object, resembles it, or otherwise serves as a mimetic surrogate, “re-presenting” what it depicts [Danto, 1982]. Accordingly, pictorial representation is at its best when, (...)
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  9.  87
    Avowals and First-Person Privilege.Dorit Bar-on & Douglas C. Long - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):311-335.
    When people avow their present feelings, sensations, thoughts, etc., they enjoy what may be called "first-person privilege." If I now said: "I have a headache," or "I'm thinking about Venice," I would be taken at my word: I would normally not be challenged. According to one prominent approach, this privilege is due to a special epistemic access we have to our own present states of mind. On an alternative, deflationary approach the privilege merely reflects a socio-linguistic convention governing avowals. We (...)
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  10. Chalmers on the Justification of Phenomenal Judgments.Tim Bayne - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):407-419.
    We seem to enjoy a very special kind of epistemic relation to our own conscious states. In The Conscious Mind, David Chalmers argues that our phenomenal judgments are fully-justified or certain because we are acquainted with the phenomenal states that are the objects of such judgments. Chalmers holds that the acquaintance account of phenomenal justification is superior to reliabilist accounts of how it is that our PJs are justified, because it alone can underwrite the certainty of our phenomenal judgments. I (...)
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  11.  14
    Trust Within Reason.David Gauthier - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):487-490.
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  12.  11
    Postmodernism's Use and Abuse of Nietzsche.Ken Gemes - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):337-360.
    I focus on Nietzsche's architectural metaphor of self-construction in arguing for the claim that postmodern readings of Nietzsche misunderstand his various attacks on dogmatic philosophy as paving the way for acceptance of a self characterized by fundamental disunity. Nietzsche's attack on essentialist dogmatic metaphysics is a call to engage in a purposive self-creation under a unifying will, a will that possesses the strength to reinterpret history as a pathway to "the problem that we are". Nietzsche agrees with the postmodernists that (...)
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  13.  75
    Contextualist Swords, Skeptical Plowshares.Bredo C. Johnsen - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):385-406.
    Radical skepticism, the view that no human being has any contingent knowledge of any external world there may be, has few adherents these days. But many who reject it concede that such skeptical arguments as SA require some sort of response, since they are obviously valid and their premises are, at the very least, highly plausible.
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  14.  3
    Real History: Reflections on Historical Practice.Rex Martin - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):490-493.
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  15.  22
    Perception and Belief.A. D. Smith - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):283-309.
    An attempt is made to pinpoint the way in which perception is related to belief. Although, for familiar reasons, it is not true to say that we necessarily believe in the existence of the objects we perceive, nor that they actually have their ostensible characteristics, it is argued that the relation between perception and belief is more than merely contingent There are two main issues to address. The first is that `collateral' beliefs may impede perceptual belief. It is argued that (...)
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  16.  4
    Blackburn's Problem: On Its Not Insignificant Residue.Jordan Howard Sobel - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):361-383.
    Moral properties would supervene upon non-moral properties and be conceptually autonomous. That, according to Simon Blackburn, would make them if not impossible at least mysterious, and evidence for them best explained by theorists who say they are not real. In fact moral properties would not challenge in ways Blackburn has contended. There is, however, something new that can be gathered from his arguments. What would the supervenience of moral properties and their conceptual autonomy from at least total non-moral properties entail (...)
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  17. Two Conceptions of the Physical.Daniel Stoljar - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):253-281.
    The debate over physicalism in philosophy of mind can be seen as concerning an inconsistent tetrad of theses: if physicalism is true, a priori physicalism is true; a priori physicalism is false; if physicalism is false, epiphenomenalism is true; epiphenomenalism is false. This paper argues that one may resolve the debate by distinguishing two conceptions of the physical: on the theory-based conception, it is plausible that is true and is false; on the object-based conception, it is plausible that is true (...)
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  18.  4
    Beyond Evolution: Human Nature and the Limits of Evolutionary Explanation.Michael Bradie - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):235-238.
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  19.  14
    Wishing It Were Now Some Other Time.William Lane Craig - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):159-166.
    One of the most serious obstacles to accepting a tenseless view of time is the challenge posed by our experience of tense. A particularly striking example of such experience, pointed out by Schlesinger but largely overlooked in the literature, is the wish felt by probably all of us at some time or other that it were now some other time. Such a wish seems evidently rational to hold, and yet on a tenseless theory of time such a wish must be (...)
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  20.  5
    What Moore's Paradox Is About.Claudio de Almeida - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):33-58.
    On the basis of arguments showing that none of the most influential analyses of Moore's paradox yields a successful resolution of the problem, a new analysis of it is offered. It is argued that, in attempting to render verdicts of either inconsistency or self-contradiction or self-refutation, those analyses have all failed to satisfactorily explain why a Moore-paradoxical proposition is such that it cannot be rationally believed. According to the proposed solution put forward here, a Moore-paradoxical proposition is one for which (...)
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  21.  9
    Mental Causation Versus Physical Causation: No Contest.Crawford L. Elder - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):111-127.
    Common sense supposes thoughts can cause bodily movements and thereby bring about changes in where the agent is or how his surroundings are. Many philosophers suppose that any such outcome is realized in a complex state of affairs involving only microparticles; that previous microphysical developments were sufficient to cause that state of affairs; hence that, barring overdetermination, causation by the mental is excluded. This paper argues that the microphysical swarm that realizes the outcome is an accident or a coincidence and (...)
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  22.  8
    Comment on Richard Schantz, "The Given Regained".John Mcdowell - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):181-184.
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  23.  6
    The Paradox of Perspectivism.Bernard Reginster - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):217-233.
    The last twenty years of English-speaking Nietzsche scholarship have been dominated by the paradox of perspectivism. Perspectivism is the view that any claim to knowledge is bound to the perspective formed by the contingent “interests” of the knower. Nearly all existing interpretations fall within one of two categories. On the one hand, this relativity to perspective is thought to underwrite a generalized skepticism: we are irretrievably locked up in a perspective which may distort our apprehension of reality. On the other (...)
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  24.  9
    Causal Asymmetries.David H. Sanford - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):243-246.
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  25.  12
    The Given Regained. Reflections on the Sensuous Content of Experience.Richard Schantz - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):167-180.
    The major part of our beliefs and our knowledge of the world is based on, or grounded in, sensory experience. But, how is it that we can have perceptual beliefs that things are thus and so, and, moreover, be justified in having them? What conditions must experience satisfy to rationally warrant, and not merely to cause, our beliefs? Against the currently very popular contention that experience itself already has to be propositionally and conceptually structured, I will rehabilitate the claim that (...)
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  26.  8
    Understanding Alien Morals.Gopal Sreenivasan - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):1-32.
    Anthropologists often claim to have understood an ethical outlook that they nevertheless believe is largely false. Some moral philosophers-e.g., Susan Hurley-argue that this claim is incoherent because understanding an ethical outlook necessarily involves believing it to be largely true. To reach this conclusion, they apply an argument of Donald Davidson's to the ethical case. My central aim is to defend the coherence of the anthropologists' claim against this argument. To begin with, I specify a candidate-language that contains a significant number (...)
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