The Pluralist

ISSN: 1930-7365

39 found

View year:

  1. “Bodyheartminding” (Xin 心): Reconceiving the Inner Self and the Outer World in the Language of Holographic Focus and Field.Roger T. Ames - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (3):100-114.
    in body consciousness: a philosophy of mindfulness and somaesthetics, Richard Shusterman expands upon a professional oeuvre in which his exploration of the phenomenon of “body consciousness” has effected nothing less than a somatic turn in the contemporary Western philosophical narrative.1 But his contribution does not end there. Over the past two decades, the reach and influence of his “somaesthetics” has been extended to the gates of China. Indeed, it has become a theme engaged by scholars of China’s indigenous philosophical traditions, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  4
    Creating the Conditions for Intergenerational Justice: Social Capital and Compliance.Adelin-Costin Dumitru - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (3):20-44.
    Suppose philosophers succeeded in putting forward two equally desirable theories of intergenerational justice. Both of them fare extremely well in regard to either a case-implication critique or a prior-principle strategy of argumentation. How are we to decide between them? To the extent that we believe that one of the purposes of political philosophy is to issue achievable and desirable recommendations or to be action-guiding, we might compare the two by applying a...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  1
    Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Legacy of Boston Personalism.J. Edward Hackett - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (3):45-70.
    When the question of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s philosophical legacy arises in the academy, so far, the question remains open-ended. Beyond his presence in public American consciousness, King left behind speeches, sermons, correspondence, and writings that inspire both philosophical and theological reflection. However, King is also interpreted on the merits of the biases and philosophical traditions that we scholars navigate. Such biases and philosophical traditions mediate our experience of encountering King, and this mediation can impact our understanding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  33
    Nietzsche, Trump, and the Social Practices of Valuing Truth.Daniel I. Harris - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (3):1-19.
    The slogans of social movements are often put forward as simple truths, so that advocacy has consisted in changing social conditions such that these new truth claims are accepted as true: that women’s rights are human rights, that Black lives matter. Social movements critical of the political ascendance of Donald Trump, however, have been concerned not merely with this or that truth claim, but with the status—epistemological, social, and political—of truth itself. Those examining this post-truth moment have often turned to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. What I Think About When I Think About Teaching Ethics: A Philosophical Exploration in Pedagogy.Douglas R. Hochstetler - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (3):81-99.
    In his book, Philosophy Americana, Anderson outlines the basic tenets of those individuals in American philosophy known as pragmatists. The pragmatists “were not Enlightenment believers in the inevitability of progress,” Anderson writes, “but across the board the pragmatists were meliorists. They believed that inquiry and experiment could lead to the betterment of human existence”. Similarly, college professors seem to understand that progress is not inevitable in the classroom either. In fact, some of the most skeptical academics may even contend that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Approaching History Through the Future: Some Thoughts From a Feminist Pragmatist.Erin McKenna - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (3):71-80.
    i was recently asked to write on the philosophy of history from a pragmatist perspective. My initial response was that this is not my area of specialization and that I didn’t really have much to say. Then I realized that it was interesting to think about how I view and use notions of history in my work as a feminist pragmatist. It turns out that in my own work, there is a theme of approaching/understanding history through the possibilities of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  7
    It's All About the Benjamins!Stacey Ake - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):76-78.
    Whenever I feel bad, I go to the library and read controversial periodicals. Though I do not know whether I am a liberal or a conservative, I am nevertheless enlivened by the hatred which one bears the other. In fact, this hatred strikes me as one of the few signs of life remaining in the world.hatred as a sign of life. We've seen a lot of this in the last year, in the last four to five years, in fact. So (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  6
    COVID-19, Camus, Aquinas, and Me.Raymond D. Boisvert - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):54-58.
    early march 2020: i'm in a french village on the Mediterranean near the Spanish border. The outdoor marché, thronged, is active twice a week. The cafés are crowded. On my morning walk, I am buoyed by the sounds of schoolchildren. The village's only grocery, a small outlet of a major chain, is well-stocked.Mid-March: pandemic. "Non-essential" vendors are banned from the marché. The cafés are shuttered. The school is closed. The little store has depleted shelves. There is a mandate to stay (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  4
    Time in the Time of COVID.William Brooks - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):82-86.
    i was 76 when the pandemic began. I'm 78 now; I'll be 79 when, God willing, it officially ends. I was a practicing, practical, pragmatic musician; the pandemic forced the adoption of a new identity. And that identity was younger than the last.How can that be? At a superficial level, it came about because I was forced into modes of behavior that are commonplace among persons born after, say, 1980, but were utterly new to me. I activated a Twitter account, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  5
    Caring About Other People.Daniel J. Brunson - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):8-12.
    during july 2020—eight months into the COVID-19 pandemic, and four months after the first US stay-at-home orders—a metaphorically viral quote misattributed to Dr. Anthony Fauci spread across social media: "I don't know how to explain to you that you should care about other people." This line encapsulated the frustration of those willing to sacrifice personal autonomy to limit the spread of COVID-19 and highlighted a consistent individualist tension in US culture.How consistent this tension is can be seen by tracing the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  7
    Temporal Disorientation and Sentimental Time.Martin Coleman - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):35-40.
    acknowledgment of a global pandemic in March 2020 and subsequent containment policies disrupted routines. Violent suppression of anti-racists and ongoing state-sanctioned killings in the United States made and continue to make plain the precariousness of justice. The disruption, violence, and uncertainty have resulted in strange, disturbing, and disorienting experiences of time, leading some to describe time as distorted and elastic.I have repeatedly forgotten what day it is and sometimes, upon being reminded of the month, had the shocking sense of weeks (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  5
    You Are Standing in a Doorway: California, Fall 2020.Patricia Contaxis - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):79-81.
    my back is to a life passed. A year, maybe more, in liminal space. Waiting. For a vaccine. For better therapeutics. For a political climate to shift. All the while, the actual climate turns against us.The waters rise in the East. Fires rage in the West.My back is to a life passed. Retirement, just before the pandemic. Post-retirement and lockdown, simultaneous. A turn to a writing life—solitary, self-directed, coming at a time when my options are limited. My go-to places for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  3
    Pandemic Scholars Circle: Deepening Community During Isolation.Jennifer Kiefer Fenton, Marilyn Fischer, Danielle Lake, Barbara Lowe, Tess Varner & Judy Whipps - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):47-53.
    a few months into the covid-19 pandemic, Marilyn Fischer and Judy Whipps were commiserating about an isolated future that seemed to stretch out with no end in sight. They came up with the idea of starting their own Scholars Circle, inspired by the November 2019 Feminist Pragmatist Colloquium in Rochester, New York. At that conference, participants could submit abstracts of work at any stage of development. Participants were grouped in small circles of three or four, with each person sharing their (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  2
    An Independent Scholar During the Pandemic.Robin Friedman - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):41-46.
    after retiring from the practice of law in 2010, I pursued my love of philosophy. I have had the good fortune to become involved with the scholarly philosophical community, to write a small number of reviews and articles, and to present papers for conferences of the Josiah Royce Society, the APA, and the Metaphysical Society of America.As it did for so many, the pandemic led me to a time of increased solitude and reflection. I wanted to think philosophically about American (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  3
    Domesticating: A Meditation on Self-Reliance.Nicholas L. Guardiano - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):31-34.
    travel, emerson often insisted, is only for the fool-hearted. He said it so many times in his popular essays and public lectures, he had actually gained a reputation for it. [It] is a fool's paradise. Our first journeys discover to us the indifference of places. At home I dream that at Naples, at Rome, I can be intoxicated with beauty, and lose my sadness. I pack my trunk, embrace my friends, embark on the sea, and at last wake up in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. A Critique of Philosophical Shamanism.Joshua M. Hall - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):87-106.
    In this article, I critique two conceptions from the history of academic philosophy regarding academic philosophers as shamans, deriving more community-responsible criteria for any future versions. The first conception, drawing on Mircea Eliade’s Shamanism (1951), is a transcultural figure abstracted from concrete Siberian practitioners. The second, drawing on Chicana theorist Gloria Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera (1987), balances Eliade’s excessive abstraction with Indigenous American philosophy’s emphasis on embodied materiality, but also overemphasizes genetic inheritance to the detriment of environmental embeddedness. I therefore conclude (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Pandemic Response: A Reflection on Disease and Education.Kevin J. Harrelson - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):13-17.
    The global pandemic caused by the spread of a novel coronavirus in early 2020 did more than transform the first one-and-a-quarter academic year that fell within its duration. It also transformed higher learning in its research and pedagogy. Like many misfortunes, COVID-19 has brought opportunity for growth and change. No doubt, there are many success stories of philosophers rising to the challenges of our time. In this contribution, I relate my own pandemic story, not as one of success, but rather (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  6
    How to Become a Philosopher From the (Dis)Comfort of Your Own Home.Sunny Williams Heenen - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):4-7.
    gun violence has been on the rise again lately. Trapped indoors, we had enjoyed a long period without it. People were dying from something else.We're all always dying, of course. Heidegger describes us as being-toward-death. Each of us is only traveling in one direction—toward the end. That end has snuck up on hundreds of thousands of people over the last fifteen months. But there was a particular end that resonated with me; it was George Floyd's death that transformed me into (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  8
    When “Power” Masquerades as “Care”.Shiva Rahman - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):68-75.
    We have become a singularly confessing society…. [The confession] plays a part in justice, medicine, education, family relationships, and love relations, in the most ordinary affairs of everyday life, and in the most solemn rites: one confesses one's crimes, one's sins, one's thoughts and desires, one's illnesses and troubles; one goes about telling, with the greatest precision, whatever is most difficult to tell…. One confesses—or is forced to confess.This is an observation made decades before all the changes that information and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  13
    The Magical Santayanan Groundwork for Metaphysical Coherentism.Forrest Adam Sopuck - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):107-140.
    There is a tension in Santayana's ontological system, one that is generated by the interactions of his doctrine of existence, doctrine of systematization, and critical agnosticism on the infinity of material substance. From and, in conjunction with what will be called the expansionist postulate, an infinite material expansion is generated, one that is in conflict with. This tension is remediated by a coherentist proposal regarding Santayanan existence, the relevant feature of which is that existents at distinct orders of organization are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  2
    Pragmatism, Peirce, and the Pandemic.Albert Spencer - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):24-30.
    as a critical thinking instructor, the coronavirus pandemic has been a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to observe how people weigh evidence, assess risk, and make value decisions. From the micro level of daily individual habits to the macro level of our species' global response, every scale of our lives has required some degree of adaptation to this crisis. Unfortunately, my training and profession do not guarantee that my decisions and behavior are any better than yours. I am as fallible as anyone, but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  2
    Pragmatist Hope During COVID-19.Sarah M. Stitzlein - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):18-23.
    as covid-19 set in, many people struggled to find or hold onto hope. TIME magazine devoted its entire annual TIME 100 Most Influential People issue to the very topic, offering up suggestions on how to find hope, from religious leaders, politicians, and celebrities. While some presented helpful ideas, I found myself seeking more satisfying and sustaining answers. I turned to pragmatist philosophers, both old and new, to help me understand what hope is, why it matters, and how to foster it.Intriguingly, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  7
    “Hominids with an Infected Brain” Engage in Viral Debate: Agamben and Žižek on the Impact of the Coronavirus Pandemic on Human Relationships.Ionut Untea - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):59-67.
    the unprecedented measures regarding population mobility and dwelling that have been taken by states across the world have led the philosopher Giorgio Agamben to wonder whether the coronavirus pandemic represents the perfect opportunity for governments worldwide to take advantage of "collective panic" and instate the use of a state of exception as "a normal paradigm". Agamben's intervention in the global conversation about the impact of the pandemic has been met with outright criticism among some commentators for at least two reasons. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  2
    COVID Reflections.Roger Ward - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):1-3.
    elaine and i were in mexico city following the 2020 meeting of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy. From our Airbnb, we walked everywhere—to El Zocalo, to museums and restaurants, and through neighborhoods. We followed the news of increasing concern about the COVID outbreak in Europe and the United States, but it seemed like news from a distant planet. Until we flew home, that is, and the airport was deserted. My college paused classes after Spring break, and the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  3
    Placental Social Ethics: Designing for Epistemologies of Resistance.Celia T. Bardwell-Jones - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):77-83.
    i thank dr. vink for her impressive analysis of design and introducing me to another method in thinking about institutional organization. I also am deeply grateful for Dr. Vink’s engagement with my work on “Placental Ethics: Addressing Colonial Legacies and Imagining Culturally Safe Responses to Health Care in Hawaiʻi” and responding to the call to re-envision alternative design models in guiding institutional operations that seek community engagement. Responding to this paper helped me to think further about the work I began (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  5
    Despairing of Despair, Living for Today and the Day After Tomorrow: Reflections on Naoko Saito's American Philosophy in Translation.Vincent Colapietro - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):104-111.
    [W]e might despair of despair itself, rather than of life, and cast that off, and begin, and so reverse our direction.This is a finely conceived, elegantly written, and exquisitely executed work. At its center, there is Naoko Saito ’s creative appropriation of one of Cavell’s most fecund suggestions—philosophy is first and foremost an activity and, as such, it is either akin to or, more strongly, identifiable with practices of translation.1 Everything I have to say concerns translation, if only implicitly. Moreover, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  5
    Indigenizing Philosophy on Stolen Lands: A Worry About Settler Philosophical Guardianship.Anna Cook - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):34-44.
    in canada, after the publication of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report on the Indian Residential Schools, universities and town halls have been flooded with questions about how they are going to implement its ninety-four calls to action and how they are going to promote reconciliation on stolen lands.1 Many universities have taken heed of the call to “Indigenize” their curricula.2 The worry remains, however, that the language of reconciliation is empty rhetoric that “metaphorizes” decolonization, rather than responding to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  3
    Imaginative Reflexivity in Decolonizing Expert–Client Relationships. A Response to J. Vink: Designing for Plurality in Democracy by Building Reflexivity.Philipp Dorstewitz - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):89-95.
    presenting my response to j. vink’s “Designing for Plurality in Democracy by building reflexivity”, I feel the urge to divert from the conventional format of a commentary. In place of analyzing and recontextualizing her ideas or linking them with further relevant literature, I would like to use this opportunity to embark on a self-reflective inquiry into effects that Dr Vink’s impulses had on my own thoughts and interactions. I would like to interpret her paper as one step in a design (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  8
    Gender and Habit: John Dewey and Iris Marion Young on Embodiment and Transformation.Amanda Dubrule - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):45-51.
    researchers carolyn pedwell and shannon sullivan have begun to examine how habit can help us better understand the concept and lived experience of gender and how habit can act as a tool for enacting social change. John Dewey’s pragmatism also inquires into how individuals can and should act and respond to their conditions and peers in constantly changing times. Through bringing together Iris Marion Young’s analysis of feminine body comportment in her essay “Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  62
    Digging at the Roots: A Reply to Naoko Saito's American Philosophy in Translation.Steven Fesmire - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):112-118.
    the two-and-a-half years that Dewey lived in Japan and China offered him an East-West comparative standpoint to examine Euro-American presuppositions. In subsequent work, he took steps in the direction of a global philosophical outlook by promoting a fusion of aesthetic refinements with democratic experimentalism. The year 2021 marks the centennial of Dewey’s return to the United States, yet philosophers in this country have only begun to take in an emerging global philosophical scene that includes unfamiliar questions, angles, idioms, and emphases. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  4
    Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Skepticism: A Response to Saito.Jim Garrison - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):100-103.
    walt whitman writes: “The Americans of all nations at any time upon the earth have probably the fullest poetical nature”. Naoko Saito is an American philosopher and something of a Whitmanesque philosophical poet. Saito’s book is “the product of many years spent reading and studying American philosophy”. She further indicates: “Mostly I have done this from a remote part of the world—far from America across the Pacific Ocean—and, like so many others, in a language that is not my own”. Saito (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  8
    Shedding Light on the "Eclipse" Narrative: Some Notes on Pragmatism in the Twentieth Century.Larry A. Hickman - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):1-14.
    i begin by thanking David Hildebrand, Daniel Brunson, and the program committee for the magnificent job they have done under the very difficult circumstances imposed by the pandemic. I’d also like to thank the program committee for their generous invitation to present this 2021 Founders Lecture.Since this is a Founders Lecture, it seems appropriate to recall that one of the society’s founders, Ralph Sleeper, said on more than one occasion that he would love to have a séance with Frank Ramsey (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  6
    “Conjoint Communicated Experience”: Art as an Instrument of Democracy.Parysa Clare Mostajir - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):25-33.
    A democracy is more than a form of government; it is primarily a mode of associated living, of conjoint communicated experience.in this short excerpt, John Dewey expresses the pragmatist conviction—first stated by Jane Addams in Democracy and Social Ethics—that a society must cultivate dispositions of curiosity and understanding between its diversely situated members in order to sustain a robust and genuine democracy. It is by our habitual exposure to the experiences of our fellow citizens that we can imagine and understand (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  2
    Reply to Critics.Naoko Saito - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):119-124.
    first, i would like to thank the respondents for their thoughtful and generous response to my book. I have found myself challenged by their observations, I have learned from them, and I have been stimulated to new thoughts of my own. Second, I would like to make a more substantive point, which is intended to frame the remarks that follow. I would like to say that translation is not understood well if it is thought of simply as linguistic exchange. All (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  3
    Introduction.Paul Standish - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):96-99.
    it is my pleasure to introduce this discussion of Naoko Saito’s American Philosophy in Translation. We have contributions from three experts in American philosophy, all of whom have been in conversation with the author for many years: Jim Garrison, Vincent Colapietro, and Steven Fesmire. Prior to their contributions, I would like to set the scene with some brief remarks to introduce the book and to explain something of its background.Over the past two decades, I have worked closely with Saito on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  4
    Recovering the Story of Pragmatism in India: Bhimrao Ambedkar, John Dewey, and the Origins of Navayana Pragmatism.Scott R. Stroud - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):15-24.
    while many have explored the international reception of Dewey’s thought—for instance, by Hu Shih in the Chinese context—little has been said about the fate of pragmatism in India. Yet there is a line of discernable influence to Indian politics and civil rights movements in the person of Bhimrao Ambedkar. Ambedkar was a famous Indian statesman and anti-caste activist, but he was also a formidable intellectual and philosopher whose collected works span over twenty volumes. He also was highly educated in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  6
    Ontology and Emotion in Reflexive Design Practices.Shannon Sullivan - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):84-88.
    i am pleased to have the opportunity to respond to Josina Vink’s rich paper on “Designing for Plurality in Democracy by Building Reflexivity.” Vink suggests that design has its roots in pragmatism and that by returning to them, design can improve itself by becoming more pluralistic and less colonizing in its effects. Focusing on health care systems in particular, Vink emphasizes reflexivity as crucial for the decolonizing of design. As Vink argues, reflexivity can help cultivate epistemic humility on the part (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  5
    Designing for Plurality in Democracy by Building Reflexivity.Josina Vink - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):52-76.
    classical pragmatism, particularly the work of John Dewey, has been foundational to the development of design as a discipline, although rarely directly acknowledged within the literature on design. Recognizing the ways in which the dominant design paradigm reproduces coloniality and modernity, I argue that going back to design’s roots in pragmatism can aid in building a more embodied, situated, and pluralistic design practice. In an attempt to counter the epistemic and ontological injustices perpetuated by design, I support the effort of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  1
    Remembrance for Stuart Rosenbaum.Nate Whelan-Jackson - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (1):125-127.
    stuart rosenbaum passed on December 14, 2020. A longtime member of SAAP and leader in other societies, he was well-known to many of us and will be fondly remembered for his kindness, his quiet humor, his insight, and his support of this community. He was a loving father and grandfather who will be deeply missed. For me, he was a mentor with unceasing generosity.Stuart transformed Baylor University’s Philosophy Department by designing and launching the PhD program. In the years before, he (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues