Business Ethics

ISSN: 0962-8770

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  1.  16
    CSR and banking soundness: A causal perspective.Sana Ben Abdallah, Dhafer Saïdane & Mehrez Ben Slama - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (4):706-721.
    This is the first study to examine the relationship between sustainability and soundness in banking as part of an integrated reporting approach. We consider 12 major European banks over the period 2006–2016. To test the relationship, two indexes were constructed, the sustainable performance index, which attempts to measure sustainability, and the banking soundness index, which measures bank soundness. The results show a bidirectional causality between sustainability and banking soundness. More specifically, soundness encourages banks to engage in sustainable development activities, while (...)
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  2.  9
    Patterns of social reporting from an Islamic framework and the moral legitimacy factors that influence them.Anna Che Azmi, Normawati Non & Norazlin Aziz - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (4):763-779.
    The objective of this study is twofold: to examine the patterns that govern social reporting with reference to an Islamic framework and to identify the moral legitimacy factors that influence them. We select 146 publicly listed Sharia‐compliant companies and classify the disclosures in their annual reports according to an Islamic framework that categorises items as either Required, Expected or Desired to indicate the degree of importance each item carries from an Islamic perspective. Based on this framework, we then analyse moral (...)
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  3.  11
    Students’ perception of CSR and its influence on business performance. A multiple mediation analysis.Enrique Claver-Cortés, Bartolomé Marco-Lajara, Mercedes Úbeda-García, Francisco García-Lillo, Laura Rienda-García, Patrocinio Carmen Zaragoza-Sáez, Rosario Andreu-Guerrero, Encarnación Manresa-Marhuenda, Pedro Seva-Larrosa, Lorena Ruiz-Fernández, Eduardo Sánchez-García & Esther Poveda-Pareja - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (4):722-736.
    Firm managers play an important role in the implementation of corporate social responsibility (CSR) actions. Education is emerging as the key factor in developing a sense of moral responsibility amongst the business students who will eventually become company managers and decision makers. The aim of this research is, thus, twofold. First, to analyze the existence of a direct positive correlation between university students’ perception of CSR and its impact on business performance; and second, to examine the extent to which two (...)
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  4.  7
    “Me” versus “We” in moral dilemmas: Group composition and social influence effects on group utilitarianism.Petru Lucian Curşeu, Oana C. Fodor, Anișoara A. Pavelea & Nicoleta Meslec - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (4):810-823.
    The paper is one of the first empirical attempts that builds on the moral dilemmas and group rationality literature to explore the way in which group composition with respect to group members’ individual choices in moral dilemmas and social influence processes impact on group moral choices. First individually and then, in small groups, 221 participants were asked to decide on 10 moral dilemmas. Our results show that emergent group level utilitarianism is higher than the average individual utilitarianism, yet, lower than (...)
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  5.  18
    Board‐level ethics committees in large European firms.Josep Garcia-Blandon, David Castillo-Merino, Josep Maria Argilés-Bosch & Diego Ravenda - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (4):824-841.
    After the approval of a code of ethics, the creation of a permanent board‐level ethics committee is the next step in the institutionalization of business ethics. This study explores how the board's structure and demographic characteristics explain the decision to form an ethics committee. The analysis is based on the constituents of the Standard and Poor's Europe 350 index. Consistent with our hypotheses, we find that ethics committees are more likely to be found in firms with a lower presence of (...)
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  6.  18
    How can corporations adopt Confucianism in business practices? Two representative cases.Shih-Ching Liu - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (4):796-809.
    Ethics is one of the oldest scholarly topics, whether in Eastern Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, or Western Deontology, Utilitarianism, and Virtue Theory, among others. Traditional ethics focuses on providing guidelines for behavior at a personal level. However, business ethics focuses more on corporations, with related studies addressing why corporations should practice social responsibility and embed ethics in business practices. Applying ethics to firms requires a variety of considerations in many areas. This is especially the case in Confucianism, which emphasizes self‐cultivation, (...)
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  7.  11
    Whistleblowing and power: A network perspective.R. Guy Thomas - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (4):842-855.
    This article presents a network perspective on whistleblowing. It considers how whistleblowing affects, and is affected by, the preexisting distribution of power inside and outside an organization, where power is conceptualized as deriving from the network positions of the key actors. The article also highlights four characteristic features of whistleblowing: third‐party detriment, local subversion, appeal to central or external power, and reasonable expectation of concern. The feature of local subversion succinctly explains why whistleblowing is difficult. The feature of appeal to (...)
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  8.  12
    Students' perception of corporate social responsibility: Analyzing the influence of gender, academic status, and exposure to business ethics education.Felix Okechukwu Ugwuozor - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (4):737-747.
    Studies on students' perception of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been growing in western scholarship. For students in African countries, such as Nigeria, there is little that is known about how and whether gender, level of study, and being enrolled in business education courses impact their perception of and disposition towards CSR. This study explores the significance of gender, academic status or level of study, and exposure to business ethics education (BEE) on Nigerian students' perception of CSR as a veritable (...)
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  9.  15
    Political connections and corporate social responsibility: Political incentives in China.Shan Xu & Duchi Liu - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (4):664-693.
    To explore the motivations underpinning corporate social responsibility (CSR) decisions in China, a country characterized by extensive government intervention, this paper investigates whether building a good relationship with the government is a political incentive that is driving firms to conduct CSR by examining the effects of political connections on the latter. Our results indicate that politically connected firms exhibit better CSR. However, the effect is considerably more significant for firms with existing political relationships. Additionally, findings show that the effect is (...)
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  10.  26
    Organizational failure to ethically manage sexual harassment: Limits to #metoo.Heather M. Clarke - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (3):544-556.
    The recent deluge of sexual harassment allegations in the media serves as a reminder that sexual harassment remains a pervasive, destructive occurrence in the workplace. Organizations in the United States have taken a legal‐centric approach to managing workplace sexual harassment, resulting in impotent anti‐harassment policies, ineffective sexual harassment training, and underused reporting mechanisms. In this conceptual paper, I argue that men's differential perceptions of sociosexual behaviors have propagated this legal‐centric approach, which fails to meet organizations’ ethical obligation to provide a (...)
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  11.  10
    Listen to the voice of the customer—First steps towards stakeholder democracy.Laura Marie Edinger-Schons, Lars Lengler-Graiff, Sabrina Scheidler, Gina Mende & Jan Wieseke - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (3):510-527.
    Recently, calls have grown louder for more stakeholder democracy that is, letting stakeholders participate in the process of organizing, decision‐making, and governance in corporations, especially in the area of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities. Despite the relevance of the subject, the impact of customer involvement in CSR on their company‐related attitudes and behaviors still represents a major research void. The paper at hand develops a conceptual framework of consumer involvement in CSR based on the existing literature, theories of stakeholder democracy, (...)
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  12.  23
    An analysis of business ethics in the cultural contexts of different religions.Isabel Gallego-Alvarez, Luis Rodríguez-Domínguez & Javier Martín Vallejo - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (3):570-586.
    The aim of our research is to analyze how different religions influence business ethics. We develop an index of practices in the field of business ethics, made up of 19 items containing practices related to workers, consumers, products, human rights, management of ethical conflicts, and crime prevention. Also, we consider a wide range of religion affiliations. To undertake this research, we use a panel data sample composed of 11,956 firm‐year observations from 18 countries. Drawing on stakeholder theory, we posit some (...)
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  13.  5
    Solidarity economy and political mobilisation: Insights from Barcelona.Michela Giovannini - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (3):497-509.
    The solidarity economy has been interpreted as being characterised by a political dimension: however, empirical and theoretical analysis supporting this statement is still embryonic. Drawing on a qualitative study in the city of Barcelona, this article analyses the political dimension of the solidarity economy and its transformative character with respect to neoliberalism by engaging with critical approaches related to the social movement studies. The main objectives were to investigate factors enabling the upsurge of solidarity economy organisations and how the opposition (...)
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  14.  10
    Cross‐sector alliances in the global refugee crisis: An institutional theory approach.Aimei Yang, Wenlin Liu & Rong Wang - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (3):646-660.
    The global refugee crisis has posed severe challenges to social stability and sustainable development around the world. While the business sector is expected to shoulder social responsibility in crisis relief efforts, our initial assessment shows that refugee‐related corporate social responsibility (CSR) significantly diverged across the Global Fortune 500 corporations. To advance scholars and managers' understanding of this complex CSR issue, this study draws upon National Business System Theory to explore how country‐level factors influence the multinational corporations' CSR communication about the (...)
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  15.  12
    How does past behaviour stimulate consumers' intentions to repeat unethical behaviour? The roles of perceived risk and ethical beliefs.BaoChun Zhao, Mohammed Yahya Rawwas & ChengHao Zeng - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (3):602-616.
    Repeated unethical behaviour by consumers is a serious challenge for participants in business transactions, including consumers, retailers, and those responsible for market supervision. Due to the inherent risk of such behaviours, we examine perceived risk to uncover the psychological mechanism by which consumers consider past behaviour (PAB) when deciding to repeat unethical behaviour. We divide perceived risk into two categories, material risk (MAR) and nonmaterial risk (NMR), based on two kinds of ethical evaluation and explore their mediating effects in the (...)
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  16.  7
    Corporate environmental performance and financing decisions.Mohammed Benlemlih & Li Cai - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (2):248-265.
    We investigate the financing strategies of environmentally responsible firms to understand how they set target capital structures and make incremental financing decisions. Literature shows that firms with better environmental performance have lower risk and better access to financing. However, it is not obvious how these firms choose to finance their investments. Using an extensive data set of U.S. firms, we find that firms with superior environmental performance have significantly lower debt ratios and use mostly short‐term debt for temporary financing needs. (...)
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  17.  14
    Conceptualizing data‐deliberation: The starry sky beetle, environmental system risk, and Habermasian CSR in the digital age.Mario D. Schultz & Peter Seele - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (2):303-313.
    Building on an illustrative case of a systemic environmental threat and its multi‐stakeholder response, this paper draws attention to the changing political impacts of corporations in the digital age. Political Corporate Social Responsibility (PCSR) theory suggests an expanded sense of politics and corporations, including impacts that may range from voluntary initiatives to overcome governance gaps, to avoiding state regulation via corporate political activity. Considering digitalization as a stimulus, we explore potential responsibilities of corporations toward public goods in contexts with functioning (...)
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  18.  17
    Cross‐national assessment of the effects of income level, socialization process, and social conditions on employees’ ethics.Kristine Velasquez Tuliao, Chung-wen Chen & Ying-Jung Yeh - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (2):333-347.
    Employees often experience ethical dilemmas throughout their service in an organization. This study utilized a multilevel standpoint to address employees’ differences in ethical reasoning. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze responses from 40,485 full‐time employees across 54 countries. Drawing from Durkheim's concepts of the homo duplex, socialization process, and social conditions, this study found a positive relationship between employees’ income level and unethical reasoning. Furthermore, the results indicate that modern social regulation, technological advancement, economic development, and economic change moderate (...)
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  19.  12
    Unethical, neurotic, or both? A psychoanalytic account of ethical failures within organizations.Simone Colle & R. Edward Freeman - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (1):167-179.
    This paper aims to integrate insights from psychoanalytic theory into business ethics research on the sources of ethical failures within organizations. We particularly draw from the analysis of sources and outcomes of neurotic processes that are part of human development, as described by the psychoanalyst Karen Horney and more recently by Manfred Kets de Vries; we interpret their insights from a stakeholder theory perspective. Business ethics research seems to have overlooked how “neurotic management styles” could be the antecedents of unethical (...)
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  20.  18
    Unethical, neurotic, or both? A psychoanalytic account of ethical failures within organizations.Simone de Colle & R. Edward Freeman - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (1):167-179.
    This paper aims to integrate insights from psychoanalytic theory into business ethics research on the sources of ethical failures within organizations. We particularly draw from the analysis of sources and outcomes of neurotic processes that are part of human development, as described by the psychoanalyst Karen Horney and more recently by Manfred Kets de Vries; we interpret their insights from a stakeholder theory perspective. Business ethics research seems to have overlooked how “neurotic management styles” could be the antecedents of unethical (...)
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  21.  10
    A reinvigorated vision for BE:ER to sustain a trajectory of excellence.Dima Jamali, Ralf Barkemeyer, Jennifer Leigh & George Samara - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (1):1-2.
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  22.  11
    Organizational environmental orientation and employee environmental in‐role behaviors: A cross‐level study.Rommel O. Salvador & Alex Burciaga - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (1):98-113.
    Amid the growth of scholarly research on environmental workplace behaviors, two limitations stand out. First, there has been scant research on the cross‐level effects of organizational‐level determinants on individual employee environmental behaviors using a methodologically appropriate multilevel analytic approach. Second, there has been an overwhelming focus on voluntary, as opposed to task‐related, employee environmentally friendly behaviors. In addressing these limitations, this field study (N = 615 U.S.‐based employees nested in 51 organizations) makes a theoretical and empirical contribution to the literature, (...)
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  23.  10
    It's not me, it's you: Testing a moderated mediation model of subordinate deviance and abusive supervision through the self‐regulatory perspective.Samson Samwel Shillamkwese, Hussain Tariq, Asfia Obaid, Qingxiong Weng & Thomas Noel Garavan - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (1):227-243.
    Synthesizing self‐regulatory theories, we provide new insights into the antecedents of abusive supervision. We, from the perspective of supervisor's self‐regulatory resources depletion or impairment, introduce supervisor hindrance stress as an underlying mechanism of the subordinate deviance–abusive supervision relationship: this mediated relationship will be intensified at the level of high subordinate job performance. In addition, we develop a complex contingency model and propose a three‐way interaction (i.e., subordinate deviance, job performance, supervisor outcome dependence) to obtain the complete understanding of the subordinate (...)
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  24.  15
    In search of a fitting moral psychology for practical wisdom: Exploring a missing link in virtuous management.Kleio Akrivou & Germán Scalzo - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (S1):33-44.
    While business as a social activity has involved communities of persons embedded in dense relational networks and practices for thousands of years, the modern legal, theoretical psychological, and moral foundations of business have progressively narrowed our understanding of practical wisdom. Although practical wisdom has recently regained ground in business ethics and management studies, thanks mainly to Anscombe's recovery of virtue ethics, Anscombe herself once observed that it lacks, and has even neglected, a moral psychology that genuinely complements the nuanced philosophical (...)
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  25.  21
    Phronesis in administration and organizations: A literature review and future research agenda.Maria Clara Figueiredo Dalla Costa Ames, Maurício Custódio Serafim & Marcello Beckert Zappellini - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (S1):65-83.
    Phronesis is essential for good decision‐making and actions. This literature review shows how phronesis has been discussed and related to elements of the field of administration and organizations. A search in the database systems Scopus, EBSCO, Web of Science, and Scielo, based on eligibility criteria, resulted in 43 theoretical and 14 empirical works. The analysis of these studies showed the most significant empirical contributions, the most cited authors, methods, journals, and central themes addressed in studies on phronesis to understand ethics (...)
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  26.  8
    The calling of the virtuous manager: Politics_ shepherded by _practical wisdom.Garrett Potts - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (S1):6-16.
    This paper extends an ongoing discussion about establishing a sharper way to conduct ethical investigations into managerial virtue. It does so by relying on Alasdair MacIntyre's moral philosophy in place of those more dominant approaches taken by scholars who make up the field of positive social science. A connection is drawn herein between a MacIntyrean “narrative approach” to investigating managerial virtue and the idea of “work as a calling.” Specifically, it will be argued that the MacIntyrean‐influenced idea of “work as (...)
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  27.  26
    A bar too high? On the use of practical wisdom in business ethics.Gregory Wolcott - 2020 - Business Ethics 29 (S1):17-32.
    In the business ethics literature, many argue that managerial decision making ought to be improved by more robust ethical concerns. Some see the virtue of “practical wisdom” as the key for improved managerial decision making. However, because of the epistemic limitations confronting decision makers in the face of irreducible market complexity, there is a risk that practical wisdom, employed in the context of day‐to‐day managerial decision making, becomes an impractical concept. Nevertheless, if the attempt to incorporate virtue ethics (and its (...)
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