Public Health Ethics

ISSN: 1754-9973

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  1.  5
    Reducing the Risks of Nuclear War: The Role of Health Professionals.Kamran Abbasi, Parveen Ali, Virginia Barbour, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, Marcel G. M. Olde Rikkert, Peng Gong, Andy Haines, Ira Helfand, Richard Horton, Bob Mash, Arun Mitra, Carlos Monteiro, Elena N. Naumova, Eric J. Rubin, Tilman Ruff, Peush Sahni, James Tumwine, Paul Yonga & Chris Zielinski - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (3):207-209.
    In January 2023, the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists moved the hands of the Doomsday Clock forward to 90 s before midnight.
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  2.  6
    Ageism Without Anticipation-Blindness.Martin Marchman Andersen & Lasse Nielsen - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (3):271-279.
    Ageism is the view that it is of greater moral value to allocate health care resources to younger people than to older people. In medical ethics, it is well-known that standard interpretations of distributive principles such as utilitarianism and egalitarianism imply some form of ageism. At times, ethicists argue as if practical complications are the only or main reason for not abiding to ageism. In this article, we argue that inferences to ageism from such distributive principles tend to commit what (...)
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  3.  3
    Understanding Pandemic Solidarity: Mutual Support During the First COVID-19 Lockdown in the United Kingdom.Stephanie Johnson, Stephen Roberts, Sarah Hayes, Amelia Fiske, Federica Lucivero, Stuart McLennan, Amicia Phillips, Gabrielle Samuel & Barbara Prainsack - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (3):245-260.
    Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the concept of solidarity has been invoked frequently. Much interest has centred around how citizens and communities support one another during times of uncertainty. Yet, empirical research which accounts and understands citizen’s views on pandemic solidarity, or their actual practices has remained limited. Drawing upon the analysis of data from 35 qualitative interviews, this article investigates how residents in England and Scotland enacted, understood, or criticised (the lack of) solidarity during the first national lockdown in the (...)
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  4.  4
    Setting a Research Agenda on the Bioethics of Loneliness and Public Health.Zohar Lederman - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (3):203-206.
    This paper argue that loneliness is a public health ethics issue and maps a research agenda for bioethicists.
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  5.  19
    Health as Complete Well-Being: The WHO Definition and Beyond.Thomas Schramme - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (3):210-218.
    The paper defends the World Health Organisation (WHO) definition of health against widespread criticism. The common objections are due to a possible misinterpretation of the word complete in the descriptor of health as ‘complete physical, mental and social well-being’. Complete here does not necessarily refer to perfect well-being but can alternatively mean exhaustive well-being, that is, containing all its constitutive features. In line with the alternative reading, I argue that the WHO definition puts forward a holistic account, not a notion (...)
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  6.  6
    Healthiness as a Virtue: The Healthism of mHealth and the Challenges to Public Health.Michał Wieczorek & Leon Walter Sebastian Rossmaier - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (3):219-231.
    Mobile health (mHealth) technologies for self-monitoring health-relevant parameters such as heart frequency, sleeping patterns or exercise regimes aim at fostering healthy behavior change and increasing the individual users to promote and maintain their health. We argue that this aspect of mHealth supports healthism, the increasing shift from institutional responsibility for public health toward individual engagement in maintaining health as well as mitigating health risks. Moreover, this healthist paradigm leads to a shift from understanding health as the absence of illness to (...)
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  7.  6
    How to Design Consent for Health Data Research? An Analysis of Arguments of Solidarity.Svenja Wiertz - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (3):261-270.
    The article discusses the impact different concepts of solidarity can have on debates on models of consent for non-interventional research. It introduces three concepts of solidarity that have been referenced in bioethical debates: a purely descriptive concept, a concept that claims some derivative value for most but not all practices of solidarity, as well as a clearly normative concept where solidarity is tied to justice and taken to ground moral duties. It shows that regarding the rivalling models of study-specific consent, (...)
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  8.  6
    Confucian Welfarism: Intellectual Origins of Solidarity for Health and Welfare Systems.Ming-Jui Yeh - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (3):232-244.
    Solidarity is presumed to underpin the redistributive health and welfare systems in modern democracies; however, it is often considered a Western—or more specifically, European—concept. While health and welfare systems have been transplanted successfully to many non-Western developed countries, whether the solidarity necessary for such systems exists or is intellectually available remains under debate. Using an East Asian country with the Confucian tradition as an illustrative case, I first argue that the Confucian tradition has special theoretical and sociological importance for health (...)
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  9.  3
    Can Geographically Targeted Vaccinations Be Ethically Justified? The Case of Norway During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Håkon Amdam, Ole Frithjof Norheim, Carl Tollef Solberg & Jasper R. Littmann - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (2):139-151.
    This article discusses the fairness of geographically targeted vaccinations (GTVs). During the initial period of local and global vaccine scarcity, health authorities had to enact priority-setting strategies for mass vaccination campaigns against COVID-19. These strategies have in common that priority setting was based on personal characteristics, such as age, health status or profession. However, in 2021, an alternative to this strategy was employed in some countries, particularly Norway. In these countries, vaccine allocation was also based on the epidemiological situations in (...)
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  10.  7
    A Woman in Berlin: Reappraising Mass Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in Public Health.Esha Bansal - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (2):123-126.
    Preventing sexual and gender-based violence—and mitigating its devastating impacts on individuals and societies—is a central challenge of public health. A Woman in Berlin is 34-year-old journalist Marta Hillers’s first-hand account of life during the 1945 Red Army occupation of Berlin at the conclusion of World War II, when Russian soldiers collectively raped 2 million German civilians. Reflecting upon Hillers’s testimony, I argue that historical narratives about large-scale acts of sexual and gender-based violence deserve a more central place in public health (...)
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  11.  4
    Femicide and Public Health Ethics: Approaching Gender-based Violence and Death in the Health Professions.Esha Bansal, Krishna Patel, Yonis Hassan & Timothy Rice - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (2):117-122.
    Femicide is an ongoing public health and human rights crisis of global proportions. Currently, however, there is a relative vacuum of ethics theory and discussion about femicide amongst the health professions. This article draws from three illustrative case examples along the continuum of femicide to explore contemporary ethical concerns relevant to addressing gender-based violence and death through clinical medicine and public health. Using an epistemic justice framework, we analyze the relative invisibility of femicide in public health discourse today, and renew (...)
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  12.  13
    Reinvigorating Public Health Ethics: Values, Topics and Theory.Angus Dawson & Lynette Reid - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (2):113-116.
    As we have now completed 15 years of journal content, it seems like a good time to take stock and reflect upon the development and nature of public health ethic.
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  13.  5
    From Sanitation Science to Geroscience: Public Health Must Transcend ‘Folkbiology’.Colin Farrelly - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (2):165-174.
    Folkbiology refers to people’s everyday understanding of the biological world. The early twentieth-century pioneers of public health C.-E.A Winslow (1877–1957), and his mentor H. Biggs (1859–1923), conceptualized public health as the ‘purchasable’ science of preventing disease and death from unfavorable economic and living conditions. Their ideas were foundational in shaping public health’s strategy of a ‘war against disease’ (Winslow, 1903), a strategy that was very successful in preventing the early-life mortality risks from infectious diseases, and was eventually extended to combating (...)
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  14.  6
    Pharmaceutical Pollution from Human Use and the Polluter Pays Principle.Erik Malmqvist, Davide Fumagalli, Christian Munthe & D. G. Joakim Larsson - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (2):152-164.
    Human consumption of pharmaceuticals often leads to environmental release of residues via urine and faeces, creating environmental and public health risks. Policy responses must consider the normative question how responsibilities for managing such risks, and costs and burdens associated with that management, should be distributed between actors. Recently, the Polluter Pays Principle (PPP) has been advanced as rationale for such distribution. While recognizing some advantages of PPP, we highlight important ethical and practical limitations with applying it in this context: PPP (...)
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  15.  8
    Taking Risks to Protect Others—Pediatric Vaccination and Moral Responsibility.Jessica Nihlén Fahlquist - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (2):127-138.
    The COVID-19 pandemic during 2020–2022 raised ethical questions concerning the balance between individual autonomy and the protection of the population, vulnerable individuals and the healthcare system. Pediatric COVID-19 vaccination differs from, for example, measles vaccination in that children were not as severely affected. The main question concerning pediatric vaccination has been whether the autonomy of parents outweighs the protection of the population. When children are seen as mature enough to be granted autonomy, questions arise about whether they have the right (...)
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  16.  12
    Drug Legalization, Democracy and Public Health: Canadian Stakeholders’ Opinions and Values with Respect to the Legalization of Cannabis.Marianne Rochette, Matthew Valiquette, Claudia Barned & Eric Racine - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (2):175-190.
    The legalization of cannabis in Canada instantiates principles of harm-reduction and safe supply. However, in-depth understanding of values at stake and attitudes toward legalization were not part of extensive democratic deliberation. Through a qualitative exploratory study, we undertook 48 semi-structured interviews with three Canadian stakeholder groups to explore opinions and values with respect to the legalization of cannabis: (1) members of the general public, (2) people with lived experience of addiction and (3) clinicians with experience treating patients with addiction. Across (...)
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  17.  7
    Can Voluntary Health Insurance for Non-reimbursed Expensive New Treatments Be Just?Jilles Smids & Eline M. Bunnik - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (2):191-201.
    Public healthcare systems are increasingly refusing (temporarily) to reimburse newly approved medical treatments of insufficient or uncertain cost-effectiveness. As both patient demand for these treatments and their list prices increase, a market might arise for voluntary additional health insurance (VHI) that covers effective but (very) expensive medical treatments. In this paper, we evaluate such potential future practices of VHI in public healthcare systems from a justice perspective. We find that direct (telic) egalitarian objections to unequal access to expensive treatments based (...)
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  18.  10
    A Taxonomy of Non-honesty in Public Health Communication.Rebecca C. H. Brown & Mícheál de Barra - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (1):86-101.
    This paper discusses the ethics of public health communication. We argue that a number of commonplace tools of public health communication risk qualifying as non-honest and question whether or not using such tools is ethically justified. First, we introduce the concept of honesty and suggest some reasons for thinking it is morally desirable. We then describe a number of common ways in which public health communication presents information about health-promoting interventions. These include the omission of information about the magnitude of (...)
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  19.  11
    Approaching COVID-19 as an Environmental Ethical Problem: A Perspective from African Relational Animal Ethics.Munamato Chemhuru - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (1):53-63.
    After the discovery of the origins of the new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to be possibly wet markets in Wuhan, China, the normative questions of what ought to be the ethical relations between human beings and non-human animals have started to attract renewed interest among environmentalists. Although these are not new questions in environmental philosophy, the impact of COVID-19 across the world is challenging human beings to seriously reconsider some of these often-neglected questions. In this article, I examine COVID-19 as (...)
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  20.  6
    Moral Intuitions About Stigmatizing Practices and Feeding Stigmatizing Practices: How Haidt’s Moral Foundations Theory Relates to Infectious Disease Stigma.C. Damsté & K. Kramer - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (1):102-111.
    Despite extensive stigma mitigation efforts, infectious disease stigma remains common. So far, little attention has been paid to the moral psychology of stigmatizing practices (i.e. beliefs, attitudes, actions) rather than the experience of being stigmatized. Addressing the moral psychology behind stigmatizing practices seems necessary to explain the persistence of infectious disease stigma and to develop effective mitigation strategies. Our article proposes building on Jonathan Haidt’s moral foundations theory, which states that moral judgements follow from intuitions rather than conscious reasoning. Conceptual (...)
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  21.  4
    Governing Antibiotic Risks in Australian Agriculture: Sustaining Conflicting Common Goods Through Competing Compliance Mechanisms.Chris Degeling & Julie Hall - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (1):9-21.
    The One Health approach to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) requires stakeholders to contribute to cross-sectoral efforts to improve antimicrobial stewardship (AMS). One Health AMR policy implementation is challenging in livestock farming because of the infrastructural role of antibiotics in production systems. Mitigating AMR may require the development of more stringent stewardship obligations and the future limitation of established entitlements. Drawing on Amatai Etzioni’s compliance theory, regulatory analyses and qualitative studies with stakeholder groups we examine the structural and socio-cultural dimension of antibiotic (...)
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  22.  11
    Responding to the Injustice of Climate Change.James Dwyer - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (1):1-8.
    Climate change continues to have profound impacts on people’s health, lives and life prospects. For the most part, people who are at highest risk from the impacts of climate change have contributed very little to the problem. This is the crux of the injustice. After I discuss the risks and contributions associated with the injustice of climate change, I turn to the issue of responsiveness: of why and how people should respond to this injustice. I avoid discussions of legal liability (...)
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  23.  15
    Exercising Caution: A Case for Ethics Analysis in Physical Activity Promotion.Katelyn Esmonde - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (1):77-85.
    Despite the important role of physical activity in population health and well-being, it has received less focus in public health ethics as compared to other modifiable lifestyle factors such as smoking and diet. However, when considering the current and potential role of physical activity within public health—including interventions and policies to encourage physical activity in schools and workplaces, changes to the built environment and the equity issues associated with access to physical activity—it is a ripe territory for ethical analysis. This (...)
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  24.  6
    Justifying the More Restrictive Alternative: Ethical Justifications for One Health AMR Policies Rely on Empirical Evidence.Tess Johnson & William Matlock - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (1):22-34.
    Global consumption of antibiotics has accelerated the evolution of bacterial antimicrobial resistance. Yet, the risks from increasing bacterial antimicrobial resistance are not restricted to human populations: transmission of antimicrobial resistant bacteria occurs between humans, farms, the environment and other reservoirs. Policies that take a ‘One Health’ approach deal with this cross-reservoir spread, but are often more restrictive concerning human actions than policies that focus on a single reservoir. As such, the burden of justification lies with these more restrictive policies. We (...)
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  25.  3
    Paternalism in Historical Context: Helmet and Seatbelt Legislation in the UK.Janet Weston - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (1):64-76.
    Paternalism is a frequent source of anxiety and scholarly enquiry within public health. This article examines debate in the UK from the 1950s to the early 1980s about two quintessentially paternalistic laws: those making it compulsory to use a motorcycle helmet, and a car seatbelt. This kind of historical analysis, looking at change over time and the circumstances that prevent or enable such change, draws attention to two significant features: the contingent nature of that which is perceived as paternalistic and (...)
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  26.  5
    Universalists, Republicans and Rationalists: Exploring Health Sector Solidarity and Its Boundary through the Comparative Experience of Overseas Taiwanese.Ming-Jui Yeh, Yi-Hua Yang & Yi-Ren Lin - 2023 - Public Health Ethics 16 (1):35-52.
    Through users’ cross-system comparative experience engaging with the health systems in Taiwan and other countries, this article probes into their understandings and value judgments and specifically their reasonings for the ‘solidarity with whom?’ question in the health sector solidarity. With the cross-system comparison approach, the study adopted semi-structured interviews with 30 Taiwanese participants who have studied, lived or worked abroad and engaged with the health system in Canada, the USA or the UK. This approach offers the opportunity for one to (...)
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