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  1.  1
    Violence and the Chemicals Industry: Reframing Regulatory Obstructionism.Brett Aho - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):50-61.
    When government actors seek to restrict the sale of hazardous substances, industry actors tend to intervene, deploying coordinated strategies aimed at delaying, preventing or weakening attempts to regulate their products. In many cases, this has involved deliberate efforts to obfuscate science, mislead the public and manipulate political actors in order to ensure desired policy outcomes. Strategies of regulatory obstructionism have resulted in the prolonged dispersal of harmful chemical substances with tangible impacts on public health. This article proposes that this behavior (...)
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  2.  6
    The Future of Phage: Ethical Challenges of Using Phage Therapy to Treat Bacterial Infections.Jonathan Anomaly - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):82-88.
    For over a century, scientists have run experiments using phage viruses to treat bacterial infections. Until recently, the results were inconclusive because the mechanisms viruses use to attack bacteria were poorly understood. With the development of molecular biology, scientists now have a better sense of how phage work, and how they can be used to target infections. As resistance to traditional antibiotics continues to spread around the world, there is a moral imperative to facilitate research into phage therapy as an (...)
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  3.  3
    Legal, Moral and Political Determinants Within the Social Determinants of Health: Approaching Transdisciplinary Challenges Through Intradisciplinary Reflection.John Coggon - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):41-47.
    This article provides a critical analysis of ‘the legal’ in the legal determinants of health, with reference to the Lancet–O’Neill report on that topic. The analysis shows how law is framed as a fluid and porous concept, with legal measures and instruments being conceived as sociopolitical phenomena. I argue that the way that laws are grounded practically as part of a broader concept of politics and evaluated normatively for their instrumental value has important implications for the study of law itself. (...)
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  4.  3
    Global Health with Justice: Controlling the Floodgates of the Upstream Determinants of Health Through Evidence-Based Law.John Coggon & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):4-9.
    This article introduces a special issue on the legal determinants of health, following the publication of the Lancet–O’Neill Institute of Georgetown University Commission’s report on the subject. We contextualize legal determinants as a significant and vital aspect of the social determinants of health, explain the work of the Lancet–O’Neill Commission and outline where consequent research will usefully be directed. We also introduce the papers that follow in the special issue, which together set out in greater detail the work of the (...)
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  5.  8
    Postscript: COVID-19 and the Legal Determinants of Health.John Coggon & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):48-49.
    This is a short postscript to the Public Health Ethics special issue on the legal determinants of health. We reflect briefly on emerging responses to COVID-19, and raise important questions of ethics and law that must be addressed; including through the lens of legal determinants, and with critical attention to what it means to protect health with justice.
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  6. The Complex Structure of Health Rights.Michael Da Silva - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):99-110.
    Research on how to understand legally recognized socio-economic rights produced many insights into the nature of rights. Legally recognized rights to health and, by extension, health care could contribute to health justice. Yet a tension remains between widespread international and transnational constitutional recognition of rights to health and health care and compelling normative conditions for rights recognition from both philosophers seeking to identify the scope and structure of the rights and policy scholars seeking to understand how to practically realize such (...)
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  7.  5
    Law, Ethics, and Politics in the Face of a Global Pandemic.Angus Dawson & Marcel Verweij - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):1-3.
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  8.  3
    One Health and Zoonotic Uncertainty in Singapore and Australia: Examining Different Regimes of Precaution in Outbreak Decision-Making.C. Degeling, G. L. Gilbert, P. Tambyah, J. Johnson & T. Lysaght - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):69-81.
    A One Health approach holds great promise for attenuating the risk and burdens of emerging infectious diseases in both human and animal populations. Because the course and costs of EID outbreaks are difficult to predict, One Health policies must deal with scientific uncertainty, whilst addressing the political, economic and ethical dimensions of communication and intervention strategies. Drawing on the outcomes of parallel Delphi surveys conducted with policymakers in Singapore and Australia, we explore the normative dimensions of two different precautionary approaches (...)
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  9.  2
    Characterizing ‘Civil Unrest’ Within Public Health: Implications for Public Health Research and Practice.Michael J. DiStefano - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):62-68.
    Following the death on April 19, 2015 of Freddie Gray from injuries sustained while unarmed and in police custody, many citizens of Baltimore took to the streets and the National Guard was called into the city. A 2017 article published in the American Journal of Public Health measured the effect of this civil unrest on maternal and child health. I argue that this research does not acknowledge the full range of motivations, behaviors, aims and values that may have been inherent (...)
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  10.  4
    Gender-Based Violence, Law, Justice and Health: Some Reflections.Geetanjali Gangoli - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):29-33.
    This article is a response to the Lancet Commission on the Legal Determinants of Health from gendered perspectives and focusing on gender-based violence and abuse. The Lancet Commission sees the role of law as positive, indeed central in providing justice in global contexts, and this contribution explores and unpacks this assertion, drawing on some examples from India and elsewhere. Some feminists have argued that law and justice are incompatible for women, and this is sometimes borne out when we look at (...)
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  11.  3
    Carina Fourie and Annette Rid, Eds. What is Enough? Sufficiency, Justice, and Health.Beatrijs Haverkamp - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):122-124.
    Carina Fourie and Annette Rid, eds. What is Enough? Sufficiency, Justice, and Health. New York, Oxford University Press, 2017. 336 p.
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  12.  5
    Socially Constructed Determinants of Health: The Case for Synergies to Arrive at Gendered Global Health Law.Sarah Hawkes & Kent Buse - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):16-28.
    Both gender and the law are significant determinants of health and well-being. Here, we put forward evidence to unpack the relationship between gender and outcomes in health and well-being, and explore how legal determinants interact and intersect with gender norms to amplify or reduce health inequities across populations. The paper explores the similarities between legal and health systems in their response to gender—both systems portray gender neutrality but would be better described as gender-blind. We conclude with a set of recommendations (...)
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  13.  3
    The Lancet–O’Neill Institute/Georgetown University Commission on Global Health and Law: The Power of Law to Advance the Right to Health.Jenny C. Kaldor, Lawrence O. Gostin, John T. Monahan & Katie Gottschalk - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):9-15.
    The Lancet–O’Neill Institute/Georgetown University Commission on Global Health and Law published its report on the Legal Determinants of Health in 2019. The term ‘legal determinants of health’ draws attention to the power of law to influence upstream social and economic influences on population health. In this article, we introduce the Commission, including its background and rationale, set out its methodology, summarize its key findings and recommendations and reflect on its impact since publication. We also look to the future, making suggestions (...)
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  14.  3
    Legal Determinants of Health: Regulating Abortion Care.Sheelagh McGuinness & Jonathan Montgomery - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):34-40.
    In The legal determinants of health: Harnessing the power of law for global health and sustainable development, Gostin et al. provide a sustained account of how law can and should be used as an instrument of health promotion. We pick up on the themes of this report with a specific focus of the importance of abortion for women’s sexual and reproductive health and the impact that particular ways of framing abortion in law can have on the lives of women and (...)
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  15.  4
    Scraping the Web for Public Health Gains: Ethical Considerations From a ‘Big Data’ Research Project on HIV and Incarceration.Stuart Rennie, Mara Buchbinder, Eric Juengst, Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein, Colleen Blue & David L. Rosen - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):111-121.
    Web scraping involves using computer programs for automated extraction and organization of data from the Web for the purpose of further data analysis and use. It is frequently used by commercial companies, but also has become a valuable tool in epidemiological research and public health planning. In this paper, we explore ethical issues in a project that “scrapes” public websites of U.S. county jails as part of an effort to develop a comprehensive database to enhance HIV surveillance and improve continuity (...)
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  16.  6
    Individual Responsibilities in Partial Compliance: Skilled Health Worker Emigration From Under-Served Regions.Yusuf Yuksekdag - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (1):89-98.
    One of the ways to address the effects of skilled worker emigration is to restrict the movement of skilled workers. However, even if skilled workers have responsibilities to assist their compatriots, what if other parties, such as affluent countries or source country governments, do not fulfil their fair share of responsibilities? This discussion raises an interesting problem about how to think of individual responsibilities under partial compliance where other agents do not fulfil their fair share of responsibilities. What is fair (...)
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  17. The Future of Phage: Ethical Challenges of Using Phage Viruses to Treat Bacterial Infections.Jonathan Anomaly - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13.
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