Year:

  1.  10
    Effective Contact Tracing for COVID-19 Using Mobile Phones: An Ethical Analysis of the Mandatory Use of the Aarogya Setu Application in India.Saurav Basu - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):262-271.
    Several digital contact tracing smartphone applications have been developed worldwide in the effort to combat COVID-19 that warn users of potential exposure to infectious patients and generate big data that helps in early identification of hotspots, complementing the manual tracing operations. In most democracies, concerns over a breach in data privacy have resulted in severe opposition toward their mandatory adoption. This paper examines India as a noticeable exception, where the compulsory installation of such a government-backed application, the “Aarogya Setu” has (...)
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  2.  2
    Incorporating Stakeholder Perspectives on Scarce Resource Allocation: Lessons Learned From Policymaking in a Time of Crisis.Bethany Bruno, Heather Mckee Hurwitz, Marybeth Mercer, Hilary Mabel, Lauren Sankary, Georgina Morley, Paul J. Ford, Cristie Cole Horsburgh & Susannah L. Rose - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):390-402.
    The coronavirus disease crisis provoked an organizational ethics dilemma: how to develop ethical pandemic policy while upholding our organizational mission to deliver relationship- and patient-centered care. Tasked with producing a recommendation about whether healthcare workers and essential personnel should receive priority access to limited medical resources during the pandemic, the bioethics department and survey and interview methodologists at our institution implemented a deliberative approach that included the perspectives of healthcare professionals and patient stakeholders in the policy development process. Involving the (...)
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  3.  9
    Emergency Basic Income During the Pandemic.Jurgen de Wispelaere & Leticia Morales - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):248-254.
    This paper focuses on an emergency basic income as a tool for avoiding financial insecurity during the time of pandemic. The authors argue that paying each resident a monthly cash amount for the duration of the crisis would serve to protect them from the economic fallout.They suggest three reasons why the EBI proposal is particularly well-suited to play an important role in a comprehensive public health response to COVID-19: it offers an immediate and agile response; it prioritizes the most vulnerable (...)
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  4.  7
    Resuscitating Patient Rights During the Pandemic: COVID-19 and the Risk of Resurgent Paternalism.Joseph J. Fins - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):215-221.
    The COVID-19 Pandemic a stress test for clinical medicine and medical ethics, with a confluence over questions of the proportionality of resuscitation. Drawing upon his experience as a clinical ethicist during the surge in New York City during the Spring of 2020, the author considers how attitudes regarding resuscitation have evolved since the inception of do-not-resuscitate orders decades ago. Sharing a personal narrative about a DNR quandry he encountered as a medical intern, the author considers the balance of patient rights (...)
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  5.  3
    Heartbeats, Burdens, and Biofixtures.Kelsey Gipe - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):285-296.
    This paper addresses a dichotomy in the attitudes of some clinicians and bioethicists regarding whether there is a moral difference between deactivating a cardiac pacemaker in a highly dependent patient at the end of life, as opposed to standard cases of withdrawal of treatment. Although many clinicians hold that there is a difference, some bioethicists maintain that the two sorts of cases are morally equivalent. The author explores one potential morally significant point of difference between pacemakers and certain other life-sustaining (...)
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  6.  6
    Just Better Utilitarianism.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):343-367.
    Utilitarianism could still be a viable moral and political theory, although an emphasis on justice as distributing burdens and benefits has hidden this from current conversations. The traditional counterexamples prove that we have good grounds for rejecting classical, aggregative forms of consequentialism. A nonaggregative, liberal form of utilitarianism is immune to this rejection. The cost is that it cannot adjudicate when the basic needs of individuals or groups are in conflict. Cases like this must be solved by other methods. This (...)
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  7.  1
    A Future for Migrants with Acute Heart Problems Seeking Asylum?Göran Hermerén - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):297-311.
    This paper discusses the future of migrants with acute heart problems and without permanent permission to remain in the country where they are seeking asylum. What does the country they have traveled to owe them? Specifically, what healthcare services are they entitled to? This may seem a niche problem, but numbers of migrants with acute heart problems could increase in the future. Besides, similar problems could be raised by, for instance, traumatized migrants with acute needs for healthcare services for other (...)
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  8.  5
    A Problem of Self-Ownership for Reproductive Justice.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):312-327.
    This paper raises three concerns regarding self-ownership rhetoric to describe autonomy within healthcare in general and reproductive justice in specific. First, private property and the notion of “ownership” embedded in “self-ownership,” rely on and replicate historical injustices related to the initial acquisition of property. Second, not all individuals are recognized as selves with equal access to self-ownership. Third, self-ownership only justifies negative liberties. To fully protect healthcare access and reproductive care in specific, we must also be able to make claims (...)
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  9.  3
    Stigmatization of Not-Knowing as a Public Health Tool.Johann-Christian Põder - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):328-342.
    Predictive interventions and practices are becoming a defining feature of medicine. The author points out that according to the inner logic and external supporters of modern medicine, participating in healthcare increasingly means participating in knowing, sharing, and using of predictive information. At the same time, the author addresses the issue that predictive information may also have problematic side effects like overdiagnosis, health-related anxiety, and worry as well as impacts on personal life plans. The question is raised: Should we resort to (...)
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  10.  8
    Return to Status Quo Ante: The Need for Robust and Reversible Pandemic Emergency Measures.Stephen Rainey & Alberto Giubilini - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):222-233.
    This paper presents a normative analysis of restrictive measures in response to a pandemic emergency. It applies to the context presented by the Corona virus disease 2019 global outbreak of 2019, as well as to future pandemics. First, a Millian-liberal argument justifies lockdown measures in order to protect liberty under pandemic conditions, consistent with commonly accepted principles of public health ethics. Second, a wider argument contextualizes specific issues that attend acting on the justified lockdown for western liberal democratic states, as (...)
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  11.  45
    Liberal Utilitarianism – Yes, but for Whom?Joona Räsänen - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):368-375.
    The aim of this commentary is to critically examine Matti Häyry’s article ‘Just Better Utilitarianism’, where he argues that liberal utilitarianism can offer a basis for moral and political choices in bioethics and thus could be helpful in decision-making. This commentary, while generally sympathetic to Häyry’s perspective, argues that Häyry should expand on who belongs to our moral community because, to solve practical ethical issues, we need to determine who (and what) deserves our moral consideration. Challenging Häyry’s principle of actual (...)
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  12.  7
    Against Personal Ventilator Reallocation—ADDENDUM.Joel Michael Reynolds, Laura Guidry-Grimes & Katie Savin - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):403-403.
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  13.  2
    Beliefs, Hopes, and Deal Breakers in Research Consent: Dissecting Mathews, Fins, and Racine on the Therapeutic Misconception.Kenneth A. Richman - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):384-389.
    In an earlier Dissecting Bioethics contribution, Debra J. H. Mathews, Joseph J. Fins, and Eric Racine challenge standard ways of thinking about the therapeutic misconception in the context of consent for research participation. They propose that instead of demanding “rational congruence” between how researchers and participants conceive of a given protocol, we should accept a less stringent standard of “reasonable coherence.” While Mathews, Fins, and Racine (MFR) provide some important insights, their proposal needs refinement. There is room for a wide (...)
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  14.  4
    From Justice to the Good? Liberal Utilitarianism, Climate Change and the Coronavirus Crisis.Henrik Rydenfelt - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):376-383.
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  15.  6
    The Cost of Coronavirus Obligations: Respecting the Letter and Spirit of Lockdown Regulations.David M. Shaw - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):255-261.
    We all now know that the novel coronavirus is anything but a common cold. The pandemic has created many new obligations for all of us, several of which come with serious costs to our quality of life. But in some cases, the guidance and the law are open to a degree of interpretation, leaving us to decide what is the ethical course of action. Because of the high cost of some of the obligations, a conflict of interest can arise between (...)
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  16.  1
    Decisionmaking and Leadership in Crises and Beyond.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):210-213.
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  17.  6
    Solidarity in the Time of COVID-19?Floris Tomasini - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):234-247.
    This article critically examines how solidarity has been enacted in the first 2 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, mainly, but not exclusively, from a United Kingdom perspective.1 Solidaristic strategies are framed in two ways: aspirations to overcome COVID-19 ; and those that are illusory, incompatible, contradictory, and disrupting of solidaristic ideals. Solidarity can also be understood more widely from a biocentric perspective. In the context of COVID-19 a lack of biocentric solidarity points to a probable cause of the pandemic; where (...)
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  18. Effective Communication Following Pregnancy Loss: A Study in England.Louise Austin, Jeannette Littlemore, Sheelagh Mcguinness, Sarah Turner, Danielle Fuller & Karolina Kuberska - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):175-187.
    Each year in the UK there are approximately 250,000 miscarriages, 3,000 stillbirths and 3,000 terminations following a diagnosis of fetal-abnormality. This paper draws from original empirical research into the experience of pregnancy loss and the accompanying decisionmaking processes. A key finding is that there is considerable variation across England in the range of options that are offered for disposal of pregnancy remains and the ways in which information around disposal are communicated. This analysis seeks to outline the key features of (...)
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  19.  3
    Toward an Africanized Bioethics Curriculum.Kevin G. Behrens & C. S. Wareham - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):103-113.
    Although many bioethicists have given attention to the special health issues of Africa and to the ethics of research on the continent, only a handful have considered these issues through the lens of African moral thought. The question has been for the most part neglected as to what a distinctively African moral perspective would be for the analysis and teaching of bioethics issues. To address the oversight, the authors of this paper describe embarking on a project aimed at incorporating African (...)
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  20. Plague Journal.Robert A. Burton - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):188-189.
    Given a strong family history of early heart attacks, the future has always been an iffy proposition. Miraculously, I have bypassed the early off-ramps and find myself approaching 80, stents in place, considering the very real but previously unimaginable possibility of still more. But what kind of more? With dopamine on the wane and no longer supercharged by the push and shove of unbridled ambition and pride, bigger and grander are out of the question. Tired clichés poke through the widening (...)
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  21. When Will the News Be Bad Enough?Robert A. Burton - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):190-191.
    The cardiac rehab nurse calls out each of our group’s blood pressures and pulse rates. It is my first posthospitalization class and I am relieved to be in the middle of the pack. Although fully aware that numbers are not fate, I cannot help wondering if the worst performers will fully satisfy the dark needs of heart disease statistics. I presume that others are making similar calculations, yet wince at the ugly direction of my mind. Maybe it is not necessary (...)
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  22.  7
    Where Does Open Science Lead Us During a Pandemic? A Public Good Argument to Prioritize Rights in the Open Commons.Benjamin Capps - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):11-24.
    During the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, open science has become central to experimental, public health, and clinical responses across the globe. Open science is described as an open commons, in which a right to science renders all possible scientific data for everyone to access and use. In this common space, capitalist platforms now provide many essential services and are taking the lead in public health activities. These neoliberal businesses, however, have a problematic role in the capture of public goods. This paper (...)
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  23.  2
    End-of-Life Decisions for Patients with Prolonged Disorders of Consciousness in England and Wales: Time for Neuroscience-Informed Improvements.Paul Catley, Stephanie Pywell & Adam Tanner - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):73-89.
    This article explores how the law of England and Wales1 has responded thus far to medical and clinical advances that have enabled patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness to survive. The authors argue that, although the courts have taken account of much of the science, they are now lagging behind, with the result that some patients are being denied their legal rights under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. The article further argues that English law does not comply with the United (...)
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  24.  2
    Telepsychiatry in the Age of COVID: Some Ethical Considerations.H. Paul Chin & Guillermo Palchik - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):37-41.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated a rapid escalation in the use of telepsychiatry. Herein we revisit some of the ethical issues regarding its use, including patient benefice, distributive justice, privacy, and autonomy. Based on these considerations we would hold that telepsychiatry is a vital aspect of providing psychiatric care, and ethically should be offered as a format for treatment, likely beyond the pandemic period. Investigative and advocacy efforts will need to continue to determine its exact role within psychiatric care, and (...)
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  25.  7
    COVID-19 and Health-Related Authority Allocation Puzzles.Michael da Silva - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):25-36.
    COVID-19-related controversies concerning the allocation of scarce resources, travel restrictions, and physical distancing norms each raise a foundational question: How should authority, and thus responsibility, over healthcare and public health law and policy be allocated? Each controversy raises principles that support claims by traditional wielders of authority in “federal” countries, like federal and state governments, and less traditional entities, like cities and sub-state nations. No existing principle divides “healthcare and public law and policy” into units that can be allocated in (...)
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  26.  2
    After COVID-19: The Way We Die From Now On.Anna Magdalena Elsner - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):69-72.
    Ethical issues raised by the outbreak of COVID-19 have predominantly been addressed through a public health ethics lens. This article proposes that the rising COVID-19 fatalities and the World Health Organization’s failure to include palliative care as part of its guidance on how to maintain essential health services during the pandemic have exposed palliative care as an underlying global crisis. It therefore calls for a different ethical framework that includes a care ethics perspective and thereby addresses the ways in which (...)
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  27. Autonomy, Coercion, and Public Healthcare Guarantees: The Uptake of Sofosbuvir in Germany.Afschin Gandjour - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):90-102.
    Health insurance coverage for incarcerated citizens is generally acceptable by Western standards. However, it creates internal tensions with the prevailing justifications for public healthcare. In particular, a conceptualization of medical care as a source of autonomy enhancement does not align with the decreased autonomy of incarceration and the needs-based conceptualization of medical care in cases of imprisonment; and rejecting responsibility as a criterion for assigning medical care conflicts with the use of responsibility as a criterion for assigning punishment. The recent (...)
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  28.  18
    Why Kill the Cabin Boy?John Harris - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):4-9.
    The task of combatting and defeating Covid-19 calls for drastic measures as well as cool heads. It also requires that we keep our nerve and our moral integrity. In the fight for survival, as individuals and as societies, we must not lose our grip on the values and the compassion that make individual and collective survival worth fighting for, or indeed worth having.1.
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  29.  2
    Why Kill the Cabin Boy?—ERRATUM.John Harris - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):205-205.
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  30.  26
    Further Reflections: Surrogate Decisionmaking When Significant Mental Capacities Are Retained.Jennifer Hawkins - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):192-198.
    Mackenzie Graham has made an important contribution to the literature on decisionmaking for patients with disorders of consciousness. He argues, and I agree, that decisions for unresponsive patients who are known to retain some degree of covert awareness ought to focus on current interests, since such patients likely retain the kinds of mental capacities that in ordinary life command our current respect and attention. If he is right, then it is not appropriate to make decisions for such patients by appealing (...)
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  31.  16
    The COVID-19 Pandemic: A Month of Bioethics in Finland.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):114-122.
    The role of bioethicists amidst crises like the COVID-19 pandemic is not well defined. As professionals in the field, they should respond, but how? The observation of the early days of pandemic confinement in Finland showed that moral philosophers with limited experience in bioethics tended to apply their favorite theories to public decisions, with varying results. Medical ethicists were more likely to lend support to the public authorities by soothing or descriptive accounts of the solutions assumed. These are approaches that (...)
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  32.  26
    The COVID-19 Pandemic: Healthcare Crisis Leadership as Ethics Communication.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):42-50.
    Governmental reactions to crises like the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen as ethics communication. Governments can contain the disease and thereby mitigate the detrimental public health impact; allow the virus to spread to reach herd immunity; test, track, isolate, and treat; and suppress the disease regionally. An observation of Sweden and Finland showed a difference in feasible ways to communicate the chosen policy to the citizenry. Sweden assumed the herd immunity strategy and backed it up with health utilitarian arguments. This (...)
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  33.  1
    The COVID-19 Pandemic: A Month of Bioethics in Finland—ADDENDUM.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):204-204.
    The role of bioethicists amidst crises like the COVID-19 pandemic is not well defined. As professionals in the field, they should respond, but how? The observation of the early days of pandemic confinement in Finland showed that moral philosophers with limited experience in bioethics tended to apply their favorite theories to public decisions with varying results. Medical ethicists were more likely to lend support to the public authorities by soothing or descriptive accounts of the solutions assumed. These are approaches that (...)
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  34.  4
    Drug Repurposing for COVID-19: Ethical Considerations and Roadmaps.Hiroyasu Ino, Eisuke Nakazawa & Akira Akabayashi - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):51-58.
    While the world rushed to develop treatments for COVID-19, some turned hopefully to drug repurposing. However, little study has addressed issues of drug repurposing in emergency situations from a broader perspective, taking into account the social and ethical ramifications. When drug repurposing is employed in emergency situations, the fairness of resource distribution becomes an issue that requires careful ethical consideration.This paper examines the drug repurposing in emergency situations focusing on the fairness using Japanese cases. Ethical issues under these circumstances addressed (...)
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  35.  20
    SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Vaccine Development and Production: An Ethical Way Forward.Kenneth V. Iserson - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):59-68.
    The world awaits a SARS-CoV-2 virus vaccine to keep the populace healthy, fully reopen their economies, and return their social and healthcare systems to “normal.” Vaccine safety and efficacy requires meticulous testing and oversight; this paper describes how despite grandiose public statements, the current vaccine development, testing, and production methods may prove to be ethically dubious, medically dangerous, and socially volatile. The basic moral concern is the potential danger to the health of human test subjects and, eventually, many vaccine recipients. (...)
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  36.  1
    Bioethical Issues in Antarctica.Kenneth V. Iserson - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):136-145.
    This paper describes the Antarctic environment, the mission and work setting at the U.S. research stations, the general population and living conditions, and the healthcare situation. It also dispels some common misconceptions that persist about this environment and about the scope and quality of medicine practiced there. The paper then describes specific ethical issues that arise in this environment, incorporating examples drawn from both the author’s experiences and those of his colleagues. The ethics of providing healthcare in resource-poor environments implies (...)
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  37.  2
    An Examination Into the Embryo Disposal Practices of Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority Licenced Fertility Centers in the United Kingdom.Abigail Maguire - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):161-174.
    When fertility centers dispose of embryos, how should this be done? Current regulatory guidelines by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority state that, when terminating the development of human embryos, a clinic should act with sensitivity, taking account of the embryo’s “special status” and respecting the interests of the gamete providers and recipients. As yet, it is unclear as to how and to what extent this achieved within fertility clinics in the UK. Resultantly, this paper examines the largely undocumented domain (...)
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  38. Human Biobanking in Developed and Developing Countries: An Ethico-Legal Comparative Analysis of the Frameworks in the United Kingdom, Australia, Uganda, and South Africa.Safia Mahomed - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):146-160.
    Although the concept of biobanking is not new, the open and evolving nature of biobanks has created profound ethical, legal, and social implications, including issues around informed consent, community engagement, secondary uses of materials over time, ownership of materials, data sharing, and privacy. Complexities also emerge because of increasing international collaborations and differing national positions. In addition, the degrees and topics of concern vary as legislative, ethical, and social frameworks differ across developed and developing countries. Implementing national laws in an (...)
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  39. Conceptual Issues in COVID-19 Pandemic: An Example of Global Catastrophic Risk.Konrad Szocik - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):199-202.
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  40. Aiding and Abetting Suicide: The Current Debate in Italy.Fabrizio Turoldo - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):123-135.
    The article analyzes the recent ruling of the Italian Constitutional Court amending article 580 of the Italian Criminal Code, relating to aid and incitement to suicide. According to the first Assize Court of Milan, article 580, conceived in 1930, reflects the fascist culture of its author. The problem of the Constitutional Court was therefore to establish whether a democratic state can still place limits on aid for suicide and in what terms it can do so.
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