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  1.  3
    ‘The World Pulse Beats Beyond My Door’. Law, Dreaming And Consumption In Viral Times.Adam Gearey - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (2):147-152.
    How is the desk, or the room in which one works and day-dreams, a concern for critical political economy? How does this theme open onto thinking about ‘the new normal’? Marx’s concept of the consumption fund and Bachelard’s poetics of space will help us plot the basic terms of a poetical/political economy adequate to law’s involvement in the intimate topographies of post-pandemic capitalism. This paper proposes a phenomenology of intimate lived space that can provide the intellectual tools to understand the (...)
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  2.  2
    Memoirs of the Plague: Lawfare.Oscar Guardiola-Rivera - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (2):139-146.
    This is an entry into a collective journal of the twenty-first century years of plague. It introduces the notion of ‘lawfare’ by way of the contemporary case concerning Lula da Silva and Brazil’s fall from grace. The latter is presented as an instance of violence in the international context, the managerial attitude to global disasters and, indeed, a plague. It chronicles the social struggles around the case and on that basis builds a somewhat playful manifesto for a new relationship between (...)
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  3.  4
    The New Common.Stephanie Jones - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (2):127-131.
    This article describes a personal relationship to a common green space in a town in the United Kingdom during the lockdowns prompted by the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020–21. It considers the new meanings that are attaching to ‘commons’ as conceptual spaces and material places; and it links this consideration to the terms in which values and norms are being reassessed in the context of environmental crises.
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  4.  3
    Confession as a Form of Knowledge-Power in the Problem of Sexuality.Iiris Kestilä - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (2):195-216.
    This article addresses two questions related to the discrimination of homosexuals in the British Armed Forces as illuminated in the judgments of the European Court of Human Rights in the cases Smith and Grady v. the United Kingdom and Beck, Copp and Bazeley v. the United Kingdom. First, how does the military organization obtain knowledge about its subjects? Two works by Michel Foucault concerning the thematic of confession—The Will to Knowledge and About the Beginning of the Hermeneutics of the Self: (...)
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  5.  5
    Planetary Confinement: Bio-Politics and Mutual Aid.Elena Loizidou - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (2):133-138.
    Michel Foucault’s modes of power have dominated both our understanding of power and norm. It is pretty impossible to think of the organisation of life outside his thinking. Here I argue that the idea and practice of mutual aid, articulated by Peter Kropotkin in his 1902 book Mutual Aid stirs us towards a different understanding of the management of life, bereft of hierarchies and bestowed with co-operation and care. Moreover, as I argue, the existence of mutual aid groups and practices (...)
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  6.  2
    The University as Meeting Place.Stewart Motha - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (2):121-126.
    The space, work, and pedagogy of universities have undergone rapid and unprecedented change during the Covid pandemic. These developments have been heralded as marking the emergence of a ‘new normal’. Reflecting on the unique aspirations and utopian sense of universities, I give an account of the political stakes at a time of fundamental change. I also provide a brief introduction to the other essays in this Supplement.
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  7.  6
    On Negativity.Jean-Luc Nancy - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (2):115-120.
    A translation of the lecture given by Jean-Luc Nancy at the conference ‘Left Theory for the twenty-first century’, organized by Costas Douzinas and Michalis Bartsidis at the Nicos Poulantzas Institute in Athens on 14 January 2021. Initial translation by Ioanna Bartsidi.
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  8.  3
    A Critique of the Model of Gender Recognition and the Limits of Self-Declaration for Non-Binary Trans Individuals.Caterina Nirta - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (2):217-233.
    This article considers the model of recognition in the Gender Recognition Act 2004 and, through a critique of the value of stability pursued through this legislation, argues that recognition as a model is incompatible with the variety of experiences of non-binary trans-identified individuals. The article then moves on to analyse self-declaration, part of the proposed reform recently dismissed by the Government. While self-declaration contains provisions that would minimise the length of the process of recognition as well as the level of (...)
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  9.  6
    Of Rebels and Disobedients: Reflections on Arendt, Race, Lawbreaking.Ayça Çubukçu - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (1):33-50.
    Hannah Arendt valued the unprecedented, the unexpected, and the new, yet in essays crafted at the end of the rebellious 1960s, struggled to square this valuation with a palpable desire for law and order. She lamented that criminality had overtaken American life, accused the police of not arresting enough criminals, and charged ‘the Negro community’ with standing behind what she named black violence. At once, she praised ‘the white rebels’ of the student movement in the United States for their courageous (...)
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  10.  5
    Blasphemy in an Age of Corroding Secularity.Jasper Doomen - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (1):51-67.
    ‘Sacred’ may be defined in various ways, depending on one’s worldview. In a pluralistic society, a single perspective from which to decide what is sacred seems absent. Yet certain elements are taken to be sacred such that they transcend individual worldviews. Their inviolability entails blasphemy laws, where ‘blasphemy’ extends beyond what is traditionally considered religious, since ‘religion’ itself is not clearly demarcated either. The interests of the sacred may be protected by blasphemy laws, but the downside of such laws is (...)
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  11.  4
    Corporate Law Versus Social Autonomy: Law as Social Hazard.Michael Galanis - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (1):1-32.
    This article argues that corporate law has become the legal platform upon which is erected a social process impeding society’s capacity to lucidly reflect on its primary ends; in this sense, corporate law is in conflict with social autonomy. This process is described here as a social feedback loop, in the structural centre of which lies the corporation which imposes its own purpose as an irrational social end, i.e. irrespective of its potentially catastrophic social consequences. The article argues that resolving (...)
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  12.  10
    Consensus, Difference and Sexuality: Que(E)Rying the European Court of Human Rights’ Concept of‘ European Consensus’.Claerwen O’Hara - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (1):91-114.
    This paper provides a queer critique of the European Court of Human Rights’ use of ‘European consensus’ as a method of interpretation in cases concerning sexuality rights. It argues that by routinely invoking the notion of ‘consensus’ in such cases, the Court produces discourses and induces performances of sexuality and Europeanness that emphasise sameness and agreement, while simultaneously suppressing expressions of difference and dissent. As a result, this paper contends that the Court’s use of European consensus has ultimately functioned to (...)
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  13.  4
    The Spatio-Legal Production of Bodies Through the Legal Fiction of Death.Joshua David Michael Shaw - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (1):69-90.
    Definitions of death are often referred to as legal fictions since brain death was conceived in the mid-twentieth century. Reference to legal fiction is generally paired with bioethicists’ concern that it facilitates post-mortem tissue donation and the health system generally, by determining death earlier on the continuum of dying and availing more viable tissue and therapeutic resources for others. The author argues that spatio-legal theory, drawing from legal geography, can account for the heterogeneity of effects that the fiction has in (...)
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