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  1. Israel Kirzner’s Presence in the History of Economic Thought: A Review of His Professional Engagement in Honor of His 91 Years. [REVIEW]Lucas Casonato - 2021 - Journal de Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 27 (1):35-49.
    This paper analyzes the presence of Israel Kirzner in the History of Economic Thought and focusing on his professional engagement with other economists. His academic trajectory is contextualized on three milestones of the recent history of the Austrian School. The first one is the ending of the socialist economic calculation debate, when the Austrian was considered unconvincing due to the economics’ shift to a general equilibrium model of the economy; in the aftermath of the debate, Kirzner entered at the New (...)
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    The Central Bank Shift to Market Maker of Last Resort: The Unintended Consequences of Unconventional Monetary Policies.Nathalie Janson & Gabriel A. Giménez Roche - 2021 - Journal de Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 27 (1):1-33.
    We analyze the transition of central banks from lenders to market makers of last resort. The adoption of unconventional monetary policies characterizes this transition. In their new role as market makers, central banks engage in the latter by extending and reinforcing interventions in other markets than the traditional bank reserves market. We then explain that the difference between the two roles is one of degree rather than kind. In both cases, the prevention of liquidity shortages is a primary concern. As (...)
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  3. Bioethics, Rent-Seeking, and Death: Examining the Opposition to Kidney Markets.Nikolai G. Wenzel & Bertrand Lemennicier - 2021 - Journal de Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 27 (1):51-74.
    The market for kidneys offers a case study of Baptists and Bootleggers. In almost every country, sales are currently illegal and donated organs are allocated by a central planner. Thousands of people die every year, because of the shortage caused by the absence of markets. This paper starts by examining the free-market alternative, and shows that a market would solve the shortage. It then uses gains-from-trade analysis to explain why current vested interests oppose a move to a market, despite the (...)
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