Cognition and Emotion

ISSN: 0269-9931

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  1.  7
    Reduction of anxiety symptoms during systemic family therapy results in a concurrent improvement of cognitive performance: a study on people with high anxiety.Delila Lisica, Maida Koso-Drljević, Birgit Stürmer & Christian Valt - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (2):245-255.
    Difficulties in various cognitive functions are common observations in people experiencing anxiety. However, limited research has investigated the effects of psychotherapy on abnormal cognitive functioning. This study assessed whether psychotherapy-related reductions of anxiety result in improvements of cognitive functioning as well. Fifty-four participants with high self-reported anxiety, divided into two experimental groups (N = 28 and N = 26), and 27 non-anxious control participants (N = 27) completed a battery of memory tasks and anxiety questionnaires in three consecutive time points. (...)
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  2.  12
    Interactive relationship between alexithymia, psychological distress and posttraumatic stress disorder symptomology across time.Andrea Putica, Nicholas T. Van Dam, Kim Felmingham, Ellie Lawrence-Wood, Alexander McFarlane & Meaghan O’Donnell - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (2):232-244.
    Alexithymia, psychological distress, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are highly related constructs. The ongoing debate about the nature and relationship between these constructs is perpetuated by an overreliance on cross-sectional research. We examined the longitudinal interactive relationship between alexithymia, psychological distress, and PTSD. We hypothesised that there is an interactive relationship between the three constructs. Military personnel (N = 1871) completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Kessler 10 and a PTSD Checklist (PCL-C) at pre-deployment, post-deployment, and at 3–4 years following (...)
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  3.  4
    When mind and body align: examining the role of cross-modal congruency in conscious representations of happy facial expressions.Thomas Quettier, Elena Moro, Naotsugu Tsuchiya & Paola Sessa - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (2):267-275.
    This study explored how congruency between facial mimicry and observed expressions affects the stability of conscious facial expression representations. Focusing on the congruency effect between proprioceptive/sensorimotor signals and visual stimuli for happy expressions, participants underwent a binocular rivalry task displaying neutral and happy faces. Mimicry was either facilitated with a chopstick or left unrestricted. Key metrics included Initial Percept (bias indicator), Onset Resolution Time (time from onset to Initial Percept), and Cumulative Time (content stabilization measure). Results indicated that mimicry manipulation (...)
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  4.  7
    The mindful gaze: trait mindful people under an instructed emotion regulation goal selectively attend to positive stimuli.Hannah Raila, Annabel Bouwer, Cole A. Moran, Elizabeth T. Kneeland, Rhea Modi & Jutta Joormann - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (2):256-266.
    Trait mindfulness confers emotional benefits and encourages skillful emotion regulation, in part because it helps people more deliberately attend to internal experiences and external surroundings. Such heightened attentional control might help skillfully deploy one’s attention towards certain kinds of stimuli, which may in turn help regulate emotions, but this remains unknown. Testing how trait mindful people deploy attention when regulating their emotions could help uncover the specific mechanisms of mindfulness that confer its emotional benefits. The present study aimed to determine (...)
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  5.  6
    Social anxiety and emotion regulation flexibility: a daily diary approach.Germaine Y. Q. Tng & Hwajin Yang - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (2):199-216.
    Previous research suggests that social anxiety symptoms are maintained and intensified by inflexible emotion regulation (ER). Therefore, we examined whether trait-level social anxiety moderates ER flexibility operationalised at both between-person (covariation between variability in emotional intensity and variability in strategy use across occasions) and within-person (associations between emotional intensity and strategy use on a given day) levels. In a sample of healthy college-aged adults (N = 185, Mage = 21.89), we examined overall and emotion-specific intensities (shame, guilt, anxiety, anger, sadness) (...)
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  6.  15
    Attentional bias towards happy faces in the dot-probe paradigm: it depends on which task is used.Dirk Wentura, Liliann Messeh & Benedikt Emanuel Wirth - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (2):217-231.
    Two recent articles [Gronchi et al., Citation2018. Automatic and controlled attentional orienting in the elderly: A dual-process view of the positivity effect. Acta Psychologica, 185, 229–234; Wirth & Wentura, Citation2020. It occurs after all: Attentional bias towards happy faces in the dot-probe task. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 82(5), 2463–2481] report attentional biases for happy facial expressions in the dot-probe paradigm, albeit in different directions. While Wirth and Wentura report a bias towards happy expressions, Gronchi et al. found a reversed effect. (...)
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  7.  9
    Remember walking in their shoes? The relation of self-referential source memory and emotion recognition.Chui-De Chiu, Alfred Pak-Kwan Lo, Frankie Ka-Lun Mak, Kam-Hei Hui, Steven Jay Lynn & Shih-Kuen Cheng - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):120-130.
    Deficits in the ability to read the emotions of others have been demonstrated in mental disorders, such as dissociation and schizophrenia, which involve a distorted sense of self. This study examined whether weakened self-referential source memory, being unable to remember whether a piece of information has been processed with reference to oneself, is linked to ineffective emotion recognition. In two samples from a college and community, we quantified the participants’ ability to remember the self-generated versus non-self-generated origins of sentences they (...)
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  8.  9
    Two social minds in one brain? error-related negativity provides evidence for parallel processing pathways during social evaluation.Nassim Elimari & Gilles Lafargue - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):90-102.
    Several authors assume that evaluative conditioning (EC) relies on high-level propositional thinking. In contrast, the dual-process perspective proposes two processing pathways, one associative and the other propositional, contributing to EC. Dual-process theorists argue that attitudinal ambiguity resulting from these two pathways’ conflicting evaluations demonstrate the involvement of both automatic and controlled processes in EC. Previously, we suggested that amplitude variations of error-related negativity and error-positivity, two well-researched event-related potentials of performance monitoring, allow for the detection of attitudinal ambiguity at the (...)
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  9.  4
    Young children experience both regret and relief in a gain-or-loss context.Alicia K. Jones, Shalini Gautam & Jonathan Redshaw - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):163-170.
    Recent research has provided compelling evidence that children experience the negative counterfactual emotion of regret, by manipulating the presence of a counterfactual action that would have led to participants receiving a better outcome. However, it remains unclear if children similarly experience regret’s positive counterpart, relief. The current study examined children’s negative and positive counterfactual emotions in a novel gain-or-loss context. Four- to 9-year-old children (N = 136) were presented with two opaque boxes concealing information that would lead to a gain (...)
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  10.  10
    Effects of positive affect and positive emotions on executive functions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.Franziska Lautenbach - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):1-22.
    Positive emotions (PEs) impact cognitive processes, including executive functions (EFs; i.e. inhibition, working memory, cognitive flexibility). However, previous reviews and meta-analyses report contradicting results. Thus, this review takes a novel approach to overcome conflicting findings by clearly conceptualising PE induction and by providing a detailed description of the tasks used to assess EFs, as well as by exclusively focusing on EFs. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis was performed. Study inclusion criteria required that subjects were healthy individuals over 18 years, (...)
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  11.  12
    Physical cleansing reduces the mindset effect in problem-solving.Fengying Li, Shan Ma, Yan Zhang, Lin Bai & Weijian Li - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):180-186.
    The present study investigated whether physical cleansing can reduce the mindset effect in problem-solving in two experiments. Both experiments followed the same procedure. In the first stage, participants formed a mindset through the Luchins’ water-jar task (Experiment 1) or the idiom maze task (Experiment 2). The second stage is cleansing manipulation. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to clean their hands with wipes (cleansing condition) or examine the packaging of the wipes (no-cleansing condition). In Experiment 2, participants were asked to (...)
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  12.  6
    Think positive! Resolving human motion ambiguity in the presence of disease threat.Ana C. Magalhães, Fábio Silva, Inês Lameirinha, Mariana Rodrigues & Sandra C. Soares - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):71-89.
    Recently, approach-avoidance tendencies and visual perception biases have been increasingly studied using bistable point-light walkers (PLWs). Prior studies have found a facing-the-viewer bias when one is primed with general threat stimuli (e.g. angry faces), explained by the “error management theory”, as failing to detect a threat as approaching is riskier than the opposite. Importantly, no study has explored how disease threat – linked to the behavioural immune system – might affect this bias. This study aimed to explore whether disease-signalling cues (...)
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  13.  15
    Sadness facilitates “deeper” reading comprehension: a behavioural and eye tracking study.Caitlin Mills, Rosy Southwell & Sidney K. D’Mello - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):171-179.
    Reading is one of the most common everyday activities, yet research elucidating how affective influence reading processes and outcomes is sparse with inconsistent results. To investigate this question, we randomly assigned participants (N = 136) to happiness (positive affect), sadness (negative affect), and neutral video-induction conditions prior to engaging in self-paced reading of a long, complex science text. Participants completed assessments targeting multiple levels of comprehension (e.g. recognising factual information, integrating different textual components, and open-ended responses of concepts from memory) (...)
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  14.  9
    Face your fears: direct and indirect measurement of responses to looming threats.Lana Mulier, Hendrik Slabbinck & Iris Vermeir - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):187-197.
    This study investigated the emotional and behavioural effects of looming threats using both recalled (self-reported valence) and real-time response measurements (facial expressions). The looming bias refers to the tendency to underestimate the time of arrival of rapidly approaching (looming) stimuli, providing additional time for defensive reactions. While previous research has shown negative emotional responses to looming threats based on self-reports after stimulus exposure, facial expressions offer valuable insights into emotional experiences and non-verbal behaviour during stimulus exposure. A face reading experiment (...)
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  15.  4
    Investigating the relationship between self-reported interoceptive experience and risk propensity.Arran T. Reader & Gerardo Salvato - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):148-162.
    Risky behaviour may be associated with visceral experiences, such as increased heart rate. Previous studies examining the relationship between perception of such signals (interoception) and risk-taking typically used behavioural tasks with potential for monetary reward. This approach may be less informative for understanding general risk propensity. In addition, such research does not usually consider the varied ways individuals engage with interoceptive signals. However, examining these different forms of engagement may help us understand how subjective experience of interoception influences risk-taking. As (...)
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  16.  9
    Retrieval-induced forgetting of emotional memories.Crystal Reeck & Kevin S. LaBar - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):131-147.
    Long-term memory manages its contents to facilitate adaptive behaviour, amplifying representations of information relevant to current goals and expediting forgetting of information that competes with relevant memory traces. Both mnemonic selection and inhibition maintain congruence between the contents of long-term memory and an organism’s priorities. However, the capacity of these processes to modulate affective mnemonic representations remains ambiguous. Three empirical experiments investigated the consequences of mnemonic selection and inhibition on affectively charged and neutral mnemonic representations using an adapted retrieval practice (...)
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  17.  4
    The role of self-compassion in loneliness during the COVID-19 pandemic: a group-based trajectory modelling approach.Robin Wollast, David A. Preece, Mathias Schmitz, Alix Bigot, James J. Gross & Olivier Luminet - 2024 - Cognition and Emotion 38 (1):103-119.
    Research has suggested an increase in loneliness during the COVID-19 pandemic, but much of this work has been cross-sectional, making causal inferences difficult. In the present research, we employed a longitudinal design to identify loneliness trajectories within a period of twelve months during the COVID-19 pandemic in Belgium (N = 2106). We were particularly interested in the potential protective role of self-compassion in these temporal dynamics. Using a group-based trajectory modelling approach, we identified trajectory groups of individuals following low (11.0%), (...)
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