Year:

  1. Towards an Ecological Civilization: A Gramscian Strategy for a New Political Subject.Gerard Ahearne - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):317-326.
    While much work has been done theorising the concept of an ecological civilization, the actual transition to an ecological civilization is another matter. One possible strategy for transforming our world from a death-rattle industrial civilization to a life affirming ecological civilization may be found in the later work of Antonio Gramsci. It is argued that as Gramsci became increasingly disillusioned with Soviet communism, and diagnosed its failure as due to the way opposition movements tend to mirror the ways of thinking, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  1
    Chaos Beyond Order: Overcoming the Quest for Certainty and Conservation in Modern Western Science.Riccardo Baldissone - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):35-49.
    Chaos theory not only stretched the concept of chaos well beyond its traditional semantic boundaries, but it also challenged fundamental tenets of physics and science in general. Hence, its present and potential impact on the Western worldview cannot be underestimated. I will illustrate the relevance of chaos theory in regard to modern Western thought by tracing the concept of order, which modern thinkers emphasised as chaos’ dichotomic counterpart. In particular, I will underline how the concern of seventeenth-century natural philosophers with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  9
    Speech, Writing, and Play in Gadamer and Derrida.Thorsten Botz-Bornstein - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):243-264.
    I revisit the Derrida-Gadamer debate in order to analyze more closely the problem of the foundation of reason and of interpretation. I explore the theme of play as a metaphor of non-foundation in both philosophers and analyze how both extract this quality from their readings of Plato’s Phaedrus. Does Derrida not essentialize the game by declaring that the playful experience of a Gadamerian dialogue must produce a metaphysical presence in the form of a hermeneutic intention? I find that the circular (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  3
    Was Samuel Butler Mainly Right About Evolution? Part I.Murray Code - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):73-100.
    Samuel Butler, a contemporary critic of Charles Darwin, proffered an alternative, vitalistic account of evolution. At the same time, he put into question all modern naturalistic treatments of this fundamental idea which presuppose that evolution is mainly a scientific problem. On the contrary, Butler in effect insists, this extremely vague idea calls for not an `explanation' but rather a fairly comprehensive, plausible story that helps elucidate an inherently complex idea. Butler can thus be read as outlining an anthropomorphic metaphorics that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  42
    A Greek Tragedy? A Hegelian Perspective on Greece's Sovereign Debt Crisis.Karin de Boer - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):358-375.
    Focusing on Greece, this essay aims to contribute to a philosophical understanding of Europe’s current financial crisis and, more generally, of the aporetic implications of the modern determination of freedom as such. One the one hand, I draw on Hegel’s Philosophy of Right in order to argue that modernity entails a potential conflict between a market economy and a state that is supposed to further the interests of the society as a whole. On the other hand, I draw on Sophocles’ (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. An Incomplete Definition of Reality.Boris DeWiel - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):50-72.
    A reality may be defined incompletely as a perpetuating pattern of relations. This definition denies the name of reality to an utter and totalistic patternlessness, like a primal patternless stuff, because a patternless all-ness would be indistinguishable from a patternless nothingness. If reality began from a chaos or patternless stuff, it became a reality only when it became patterned. If there are orders of reality with perpetuating relations between them, as in Cartesian interactive substance dualism, the definition allows us to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  21
    Living and Knowing: How Nature Makes Knowledge Possible.Miichael Dix - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):1-34.
    Traditional human-centred epistemologies have failed to adequately address the question, ‘How are cognition and knowledge possible?’ Naturalistic epistemologies, however, and in particular, evolutionary, biosemiotic, and autopoeitic approaches, have recognized that humans are not the only knowers, perceivers, cognizers and rememberers in nature, and thus ask instead, ‘How does nature make cognition and knowledge possible?’ thereby reconceiving epistemology as study of the cognition and experience of living, embodied, interacting and inter-signifying natural beings. Nonetheless, their insights into how nature makes knowledge possible, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  26
    Time and Presence in Agamben's Critique of Deconstruction.Jenny Doussan - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):183-202.
    Enmeshed with Agamben’s critique of metaphysics is his critique of deconstruction. Following the sentiment he first outlined in Language and Death: The Place of Negativity, deconstruction’s alleged attempt to displace the privileging of speech with that of writing to thereby dispel the negativity at the core of Western metaphysics, to the contrary has the effect of reifying this problem by expressing its terms most perfectly. Agamben takes this criticism further in the Homo Sacer series by suggesting that not only does (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  1
    Hegel's Philosophy of Nature of 1805-6: Its Relation to the Phenomenology of Spirit.Daniel E. Shannon - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):101-132.
    Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit was the introduction and first part of the Jena System III; it was to introduce the other parts of his project. Most commentators on Hegel’s Phenomenology, however, do not consider how the Phenomenology relates to the other parts, and some discount Hegel’s understanding and commitment to the natural philosophy of his day. This paper attempts to make the connection between the Phenomenology and the Natural Philosophy of 1805-6 explicit; to show where and how the connections are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Grand Narrative of the Age of Re-Embodiments: Beyond Modernism and Postmodernism.Arran Gare - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):327-357.
    The delusory quest for disembodiment, against which the quest for re-embodiment is reacting, is characteristic of macroparasites who live off the work, products and lives of others. The quest for disembodiment that characterizes modernism and postmodernism, it is argued, echoes in a more extreme form the delusions on which medieval civilization was based where the military aristocracy and the clergy, defining themselves through the ideal forms of Neo-Platonic Christianity, despised nature, the peasantry and in the case of the clergy, women. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  2
    Overcoming Incommensurability Through Intercultural Dialogue.Paul Healy - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):265-281.
    Is universalism necessarily ethnocentric? Are there inevitably incommensurable differences between diverse cultures and traditions? While these questions may appear highly theoretical at first sight, they inevitably have significant practical consequences as witnessed by the prominent contemporary discourse about a “clash of civilizations”, on the one hand, and by the challenges confronting multiculturalism, on the other. As these debates attest, the foregoing questions are truly significant because, if there is no genuine possibility of overcoming incommensurability by finding and building on common (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  16
    The Spiritual Meaning of Technological Evolution to Life.Joseph Morrill Kirby - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):282-300.
    There are two senses by which technology can be seen as a new layer of living complexity: first, while biological systems can only appropriate 24 of the 91 natural elements into their metabolic processes, technological systems can imbue complex form into all 91 elements; second, this added capacity gives life the potential to expand across its current limit – the atmosphere of the Earth – in the same way as it expanded from the oceans to the land some five hundred (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  20
    Rhetoric and Rationality.Steve Mackey - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):203-224.
    The dominance of a purist, ‘scientistic’ form of reason since the Enlightenment has eclipsed and produced multiple misunderstandings of the nature, role of and importance of the millennia-old art of rhetoric. For centuries the multiple perspectives conveyed by rhetoric were always the counterbalance to hubristic claims of certainty. As such rhetoric was taught as one of the three essential components of the ‘trivium’ – rhetoric, dialectic and grammar; i.e. persuasive communication, logical reasoning and the codification of discourse. These three disciplines (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  3
    Reflections on the Existential Philosophy of T.S. Eliot's Poetry.Prajna Pani - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):301-316.
    The paper examines a ground that the chosen philosophers share. It will address man’s existential crisis - his confusion and despair over his existence. T. S Eliot believed that his insight could pull humanity out of the despair and hopelessness of modern era. The paper emphasizes the self transcending character of human existence. The eternal human situation offers liberation of mankind which starts with a total knowledge of man by himself. Through philosophical and existential exploration we can enter into, in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  9
    Iteration and Truth: A Fifth "Orientation of Thought".Hannu Poutiainen - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):161-182.
    This article offers a novel interpretation of Jacques Derrida’s deconstructive thought in terms of model theory. Taking its cue from Paul Livingston’s Politics of Logic, which interprets Derrida as a thinker of inconsistent totalities, the article argues that Livingston’s description of Derrida is unable to accommodate certain consistency-driven aspects of Derrida’s work. These aspects pertain to Derrida’s notion of ”iterability”. The article demonstrates that the context-bound nature of iteration – the altering repetition of any discrete unit of meaning – and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  25
    Situating Norms and Jointness of Social Interaction.Patrizio Lo Presti - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):225-248.
    The paper argues that contexts of interaction are structured in a way that coordinates part actions into normatively guided joint action without agents having common knowledge or mutual beliefs about intentions, beliefs, or commitments to part actions. The argument shows earlier analyses of joint action to be fundamentally flawed because they have not taken contextual influences on joint action properly into account. Specific completion of earlier analyses is proposed. It is concluded that attention to features distributed in context of interaction (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Heidegger's Historicisation of Aristotelean Being.Susan Roberts - 2013 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):161-182.
    This article examines Heidegger’s early work concerned with establishing a fundamental ontology. Specifically, it examines Heidegger’s interpretation and presentation of Aristotle’s own ontological thought. Given Heidegger’s predetermined assessment of being as historically determined, it is sought to show how that predetermined view influences Heidegger’s presentation of Aristotle’s metaphysical work. The wider implications of Heidegger’s assertion that being human is irretrievably historical are also considered.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues