AI and Society

ISSNs: 0951-5666, 1425-5655

36 found

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  1.  9
    Give the machine a chance, human experts ain’t that great….Petr Špecián & Lucy Císař Brown - 2024 - AI and Society 2024:1-2.
    Despite their flaws, large language models (LLMs) deserve a fair chance to prove their mettle against human experts, who are often plagued with biases, conflicts of interest, and other frailties. For epistemically unprivileged laypeople struggling to access expert knowledge, the accessibility advantages of LLMs could prove crucial. While complaints about LLMs' inconsistencies and arguments for human superiority are often justified (for now), they distract from the urgent need to prepare for the likely scenario of LLMs' continued ascent. Experimentation with both (...)
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  2.  23
    The misdirected approach of open source algorithms.Joshua L. M. Brand - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (2):807-808.
  3.  38
    Book review: Luca Possati (2021): “The algorithmic unconscious: how psychoanalysis helps in understanding AI” (Routledge). [REVIEW]Marc Cheong - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (2):819-821.
  4.  38
    Thinking about the mind-technology problem.Manh-Tung Ho - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (2):823-824.
  5.  42
    Neurorights: the Chilean constitutional change.Allan McCay - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (2):797-798.
  6.  32
    Algorithmic biases: caring about teens’ neurorights.José M. Muñoz & José Ángel Marinaro - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (2):809-810.
  7.  28
    The scientist of the scientist.Tomer Simon - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (2):803-804.
  8.  25
    Toward the symbiocene through artificial intelligence.Amar Singh & Shipra Tholia - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (2):805-806.
  9.  24
    Justificatory explanations in machine learning: for increased transparency through documenting how key concepts drive and underpin design and engineering decisions.David Casacuberta, Ariel Guersenzvaig & Cristian Moyano-Fernández - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):279-293.
    Given the pervasiveness of AI systems and their potential negative effects on people’s lives (especially among already marginalised groups), it becomes imperative to comprehend what goes on when an AI system generates a result, and based on what reasons, it is achieved. There are consistent technical efforts for making systems more “explainable” by reducing their opaqueness and increasing their interpretability and explainability. In this paper, we explore an alternative non-technical approach towards explainability that complement existing ones. Leaving aside technical, statistical, (...)
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  10.  28
    Machine agency and representation.Beba Cibralic & James Mattingly - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):345-352.
    Theories of action tend to require agents to have mental representations. A common trope in discussions of artificial intelligence (AI) is that they do not, and so cannot be agents. Properly understood there may be something to the requirement, but the trope is badly misguided. Here we provide an account of representation for AI that is sufficient to underwrite attributions to these systems of ownership, action, and responsibility. Existing accounts of mental representation tend to be too demanding and unparsimonious. We (...)
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  11.  8
    Eliza! A reckoning with Cartesian magic.Karamjit S. Gill - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):1-3.
  12.  32
    On freedom and slavery when using a smart device.Anna Gorbacheva & Andrey Pestunov - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):397-398.
  13.  20
    Digital sovereignty, digital infrastructures, and quantum horizons.Geoff Gordon - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):125-137.
    This article holds that governmental investments in quantum technologies speak to the imaginable futures of digital sovereignty and digital infrastructures, two major areas of change driven by related technologies like AI and Big Data, among other things, in international law today. Under intense development today for future interpolation into digital systems that they may alter, quantum technologies occupy a sort of liminal position, rooted in existing assemblages of computational technologies while pointing to new horizons for them. The possibilities they raise (...)
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  14.  38
    Art histories from nowhere: on the coloniality of experiments in art and artificial intelligence.Mashinka Firunts Hakopian - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):29-41.
    This paper considers recent experiments in art and artificial intelligence that crystallize around training algorithms to generate artworks based on datasets derived from the Western art historical canon. Over the last decade, a shift towards the rejection of canonicity has begun to take shape in art historical discourse. At the same time, algorithmically enabled practices in the US and Europe have emerged that entrench the Western canon as a locus and guarantor of aesthetic value. Operating within the epistemic framework of (...)
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  15.  68
    Artificial intelligence with American values and Chinese characteristics: a comparative analysis of American and Chinese governmental AI policies.Emmie Hine & Luciano Floridi - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):257-278.
    As China and the United States strive to be the primary global leader in AI, their visions are coming into conflict. This is frequently painted as a fundamental clash of civilisations, with evidence based primarily around each country’s current political system and present geopolitical tensions. However, such a narrow view claims to extrapolate into the future from an analysis of a momentary situation, ignoring a wealth of historical factors that influence each country’s prevailing philosophy of technology and thus their overarching (...)
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  16.  16
    Just accountability structures – a way to promote the safe use of automated decision-making in the public sector.Hanne Hirvonen - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):155-167.
    The growing use of automated decision-making (ADM) systems in the public sector and the need to control these has raised many legal questions in academic research and in policymaking. One of the timely means of legal control is accountability, which traditionally includes the ability to impose sanctions on the violator as one dimension. Even though many risks regarding the use of ADM have been noted and there is a common will to promote the safety of these systems, the relevance of (...)
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  17.  42
    Silence: an ignored concept in artificial intelligence.Mahdi Kafaee, Aliakbar Kouchakzadeh & Shahriar Gharibzadeh - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):415-416.
  18.  18
    Challenges in enabling user control over algorithm-based services.Pascal D. König - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):195-205.
    Algorithmic systems that provide services to people by supporting or replacing human decision-making promise greater convenience in various areas. The opacity of these applications, however, means that it is not clear how much they truly serve their users. A promising way to address the issue of possible undesired biases consists in giving users control by letting them configure a system and aligning its performance with users’ own preferences. However, as the present paper argues, this form of control over an algorithmic (...)
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  19.  66
    The Turing test is a joke.Attay Kremer - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):399-401.
  20.  21
    Body stakes: an existential ethics of care in living with biometrics and AI.Amanda Lagerkvist, Matilda Tudor, Jacek Smolicki, Charles M. Ess, Jenny Eriksson Lundström & Maria Rogg - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):169-181.
    This article discusses the key existential stakes of implementing biometrics in human lifeworlds. In this pursuit, we offer a problematization and reinvention of central values often taken for granted within the “ethical turn” of AI development and discourse, such as autonomy, agency, privacy and integrity, as we revisit basic questions about what it means to be human and embodied. Within a framework of existential media studies, we introduce an existential ethics of care—through a conversation between existentialism, virtue ethics, a feminist (...)
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  21.  21
    Sculpting the social algorithm for radical futurity.Anisa Matthews - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):75-86.
    Social media has revolutionized the way information is distributed throughout society, as folks continue to rely entirely on these apps for information on current events, health protocols, and socio-political discussions. However, these containers of knowledge do not appear in the same shape for every user; Algorithms, informed by capitalist agendas, determine what information sifts through its networks and to whom. Data scientists, researchers, and activists have dissected the hidden mechanics fueling these popular platforms, inciting critical conversations around the harmful biases (...)
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  22.  31
    What about investors? ESG analyses as tools for ethics-based AI auditing.Matti Minkkinen, Anniina Niukkanen & Matti Mäntymäki - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):329-343.
    Artificial intelligence (AI) governance and auditing promise to bridge the gap between AI ethics principles and the responsible use of AI systems, but they require assessment mechanisms and metrics. Effective AI governance is not only about legal compliance; organizations can strive to go beyond legal requirements by proactively considering the risks inherent in their AI systems. In the past decade, investors have become increasingly active in advancing corporate social responsibility and sustainability practices. Including nonfinancial information related to environmental, social, and (...)
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  23.  17
    Artificial reproduction? Tabita Rezaire’s Sugar Walls Teardom and AI “liveness”.Sara Morais dos Santos Bruss - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):1-9.
    Much more than their machinic reality, current iterations of AI rely on imagined divisions of human and non-human properties and skills that have genealogical ties to colonization. For this reason, research efforts have recently been made to historicize these imaginaries, connecting them to colonial ideals that delegate black and brown colonized people into the realm of the non-human. Atanasoski and Vora (Surrogate humanity. Race, robots and the politics of technological futures, Duke, Durham and London, 2019) have called this a “surrogate (...)
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  24.  28
    Reflections on emerging HCI–AI research.Swaroop Panda & Shatarupa Thakurta Roy - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):407-409.
    Human computer interaction (HCI) has grown into a mature field of research. With artificial intelligence (AI) finding ubiquitous applications, HCI research is now moving ahead towards accommodating and integrating these approaches. A part of the research community is of the opinion that HCI and AI are fundamentally opposed to each other: with AI-powered devices being demonic and humans are to lose in a race against them and HCI-oriented products being human centred being the flag bearers of the human race. In (...)
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  25.  46
    AI ethics inflation, Delphi and the restart of theory.Peter Seele - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):403-405.
  26.  30
    Hasta la vista baby: why we should dispense of “autonomy” in “autonomous systems”.Helen Smith, Kerstin Eder & Jonathan Ives - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):395-396.
  27.  28
    Legal and ethical aspects of deploying artificial intelligence in climate-smart agriculture.Mahatab Uddin, Ataharul Chowdhury & Muhammad Ashad Kabir - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):221-234.
    This study aims to identify artificial intelligence (AI) technologies that are applied in climate-smart agricultural practices and address ethical concerns of deploying those technologies from legal perspectives. As climate-smart agricultural AI, the study considers those AI-based technologies that are used for precision agriculture, monitoring peat lands, deforestation tracking, and improved forest management. The study utilized a systematic literature review approach to identify and analyze AI technologies employed in climate-smart agriculture and associated ethical and legal concerns. The study findings indicate several (...)
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  28.  24
    Towards a decolonial I in AI & Society.Victoria Vesna - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):5-6.
  29.  25
    Safety by simulation: theorizing the future of robot regulation.Mika Viljanen - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):139-154.
    Mobility robots may soon be among us, triggering a need for safety regulation. Robot safety regulation, however, remains underexplored, with only a few articles analyzing what regulatory approaches could be feasible. This article offers an account of the available regulatory strategies and attempts to theorize the effects of simulation-based safety regulation. The article first discusses the distinctive features of mobility robots as regulatory targets and argues that emergent behavior constitutes the key regulatory concern in designing robot safety regulation regimes. In (...)
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  30. “Please understand we cannot provide further information”: evaluating content and transparency of GDPR-mandated AI disclosures.Alexander J. Wulf & Ognyan Seizov - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):235-256.
    The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) of the EU confirms the protection of personal data as a fundamental human right and affords data subjects more control over the way their personal information is processed, shared, and analyzed. However, where data are processed by artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms, asserting control and providing adequate explanations is a challenge. Due to massive increases in computing power and big data processing, modern AI algorithms are too complex and opaque to be understood by most data (...)
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  31.  33
    The goddess and her icon: body and mind in the era of artificial intelligence.George Zarkadakis - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):87-89.
    As the pagan classical world was subsumed into Christianity sexually hyperactive gods and goddesses transmuted into saints, their former statues that glorified the perfection of their bodies smashed into pieces and reimagined as austere two-dimensional icons to be worshipped by the new faithful. That dualistic and polemic narrative, where the soul’s purpose was to annihilate the body, survives today in the distinction between software and hardware, algorithms and robots, the former as the “ghosts” that animate the empty vessels, the “machines”. (...)
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  32. ChatGPT: towards AI subjectivity.Kristian D’Amato - 2024 - AI and Society 39:1-15.
    Motivated by the question of responsible AI and value alignment, I seek to offer a uniquely Foucauldian reconstruction of the problem as the emergence of an ethical subject in a disciplinary setting. This reconstruction contrasts with the strictly human-oriented programme typical to current scholarship that often views technology in instrumental terms. With this in mind, I problematise the concept of a technological subjectivity through an exploration of various aspects of ChatGPT in light of Foucault’s work, arguing that current systems lack (...)
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  33. Escape climate apathy by harnessing the power of generative AI.Quan-Hoang Vuong & Manh-Tung Ho - 2024 - AI and Society 39:1-2.
    “Throw away anything that sounds too complicated. Only keep what is simple to grasp...If the information appears fuzzy and causes the brain to implode after two sentences, toss it away and stop listening. Doing so will make the news as orderly and simple to understand as the truth.” - In “GHG emissions,” The Kingfisher Story Collection, (Vuong 2022a).
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  34. The argument for near-term human disempowerment through AI.Leonard Dung - 2024 - AI and Society:1-14.
    Many researchers and intellectuals warn about extreme risks from artificial intelligence. However, these warnings typically came without systematic arguments in support. This paper provides an argument that AI will lead to the permanent disempowerment of humanity, e.g. human extinction, by 2100. It rests on four substantive premises which it motivates and defends: first, the speed of advances in AI capability, as well as the capability level current systems have already reached, suggest that it is practically possible to build AI systems (...)
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  35. Augmenting Morality through Ethics Education: the ACTWith model.Jeffrey White - 2024 - AI and Society:1-20.
    Recently in this journal, Jessica Morley and colleagues (AI & SOC 2023 38:411–423) review AI ethics and education, suggesting that a cultural shift is necessary in order to prepare students for their responsibilities in developing technology infrastructure that should shape ways of life for many generations. Current AI ethics guidelines are abstract and difficult to implement as practical moral concerns proliferate. They call for improvements in ethics course design, focusing on real-world cases and perspective-taking tools to immerse students in challenging (...)
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  36.  48
    Artificial intelligence and human autonomy: the case of driving automation.Fabio Fossa - 2024 - AI and Society:1-12.
    The present paper aims at contributing to the ethical debate on the impacts of artificial intelligence (AI) systems on human autonomy. More specifically, it intends to offer a clearer understanding of the design challenges to the effort of aligning driving automation technologies to this ethical value. After introducing the discussion on the ambiguous impacts that AI systems exert on human autonomy, the analysis zooms in on how the problem has been discussed in the literature on connected and automated vehicles (CAVs). (...)
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