Year:

  1.  2
    Major Review: Cast Out of the Covenant: Jews and Anti-Judaism in the Gospel of John by Adele Reinhartz.Jo-Ann A. Brant - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (4):389-391.
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  2.  1
    Major Review: Who Needs the Old Testament? Its Enduring Appeal and Why the New Atheists Don’T Get It by Katharine Dell.Collin Cornell - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (4):386-388.
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  3.  1
    Boundaries, Intersections, and the Parting of Ways in the Letter of James.Kathleen Gallagher Elkins & Thomas M. Bolin - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (4):335-343.
    The letter of James reveals long embedded anti-Semitic elements at work in the articulation of the distinction between Judaism and Christianity. However, careful examination of the text and the history of the early synagogue and church challenges us to rethink how Judaism and Christianity have parted ways. James’s use of biblical traditions is not simply an embrace of torah piety or “works righteousness,” but rather a careful juxtaposition of wisdom and prophetic traditions aimed to call the letter’s first readers, and (...)
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  4. James 5:13–20.Robin Gallaher Branch - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (4):377-379.
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  5.  1
    “I’Ll Show You My Faith” (James 2:18): Inspiring Models for Exilic Life.Joel B. Green - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (4):344-352.
    Abraham, Rahab, Job, and Elijah do more than illustrate the various points James wants to make about faithful living. In perhaps surprising ways, they invite imitation, identification, and empathetic association among his audience. James recalls these figures from Israel’s past so as to encourage his readers and auditors to respond to the rigors of exilic life with comparable patterns of faith and practice.
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  6.  1
    Major Review: James by Martha L. Moore-Keish.Holly Hearon - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (4):380-382.
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  7. The Storied World of James.Holly Hearon - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (4):353-362.
    This essay explores how third-person characters are employed in the letter of James to illustrate theological propositions. The words and actions of the characters are shown to shape social worlds in consequential ways and demonstrate the deeply relational nature of the letter’s theology. Using elements of narrative and socio-rhetorical criticisms, attention is given to setting, characterization, thematic development, and networks of signification. The essay demonstrates how storied episodes involving third-person characters contribute to the literary coherency of the letter and illustrate (...)
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  8.  1
    Major Review: A Historical Theology of the Hebrew Bible by Konrad Schmid.Mark McEntire - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (4):383-385.
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  9.  1
    Tongue on Fire: Ethics of Speech in James.Pheme Perkins - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (4):363-373.
    James 3:1–12 supplements routine exhortations to guard against the speech which follows from particular vices with a wisdom speech on the tongue, which appears to make the project impossible. Limiting the reflection on out of control or destructive speech to those seeking recognition as teachers introduces examples of destructive false teaching not present in James. The moralists’ distinction between those who require moral reprimand, those serious about making progress in virtue, and the “wise” as employed in Pauline exhortation resolves the (...)
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  10. James 1:17–27.Angela Rosita Cowser - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (4):374-376.
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  11.  1
    Genesis 19:1–28.Shannon Craigo-Snell - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (3):289-291.
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  12.  3
    Major Review: Divine Bodies: Resurrecting Perfection in the New Testament and Early Christianity by Candida R. Moss.Carly Daniel-Hughes - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (3):298-300.
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  13.  1
    Major Review: The Letter to the Colossians by Scot McKnight.Michael J. Gorman - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (3):303-305.
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  14.  1
    Psalm 139.Elizabeth Grasham - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (3):292-294.
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  15.  1
    Cultural Influences on Hermeneutical Frameworks in the Debate on Same-Sex Relationships.Karen R. Keen - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (3):253-264.
    Socio-cultural changes in the West have influenced interpretation and use of scriptural texts among both those who oppose and support same-sex relationships. Cultural distance from the values of antiquity on matters of family structures and perceptions of people attracted to the same sex have led to greater attention to theological reflection beyond the standard biblical prohibition texts, particularly among conservative evangelicals. This article looks at two key areas of discussion: theological anthropology and sanctification.
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  16. Paul on Same-Sex Relations in Romans 1.William Loader - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (3):242-252.
    Paul expresses the common Jewish view that same-sex relations typify the depravity of the non-Jewish world, primarily as a means of finding common ground with those who would be listening to his letter and to argue that sins by his own Jewish people, though different, are no less deplorable and conclude that therefore both need Christ’s redemption. Assuming God created humans male and female, he finds the roots of such behavior in distorted minds and passions resulting from distorted understandings of (...)
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  17.  3
    Major Review: Resurrecting Wounds: Living in the Afterlife of Trauma by Shelly Rambo.Paula Owens Parker - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (3):301-302.
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  18. Coming Out and the Bible.Mona West - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (3):265-274.
    Mona West shares her journey with the Bible as a feminist and a lesbian to articulate an approach to reading the Bible that claims it as a text to be trusted by queer people of faith. Drawing parallels with the ancient practice of lectio divina, she develops a method for praying the Scriptures using the process of coming out.
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  19.  2
    Peace, Unity, and Purity and the Presbyterian Church’s Fifty-Year Journey on Human Sexuality.John Wilkinson - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (3):275-288.
    Recent ordination controversies have served as barometers for how denominations have addressed matters of human sexuality, and LGBTQ sexuality in particular. Using the Presbyterian Church ’s fifty-year narrative as a case study, this article traces developments in thought and shifts in perspective, from language that calls “homosexual acts” sin to actions that move from apology to celebration. The essay follows decades of intense debate and conflict to reflect on the implications when a church changes its mind.
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  20.  1
    Romans 1:18–28.Karyn L. Wiseman - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (3):295-297.
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  21. Major Review: A Peculiar Orthodoxy: Reflections on Theology and the Arts by Jeremy S. Begbie.Lee C. Barrett - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):207-209.
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  22.  2
    Major Review: The Lord’s Prayer by C. Clifton Black.John T. Carroll - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):205-206.
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  23.  2
    Holy Terror: Confronting Our Fears and Loving Our Movie Monsters.Craig Detweiler - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):171-182.
    While the natural world may scare us, more frightening beasts arise when we neglect our calling to care for creation and “play god” via technology. From King Kong, Frankenstein, and Godzilla to recent films like The Babadook, The Shape of Water and Us, the most enduring monsters provoke humility, evoke empathy, and prompt us to love rather than fear. These holy terrors can offer an encounter with what Rudolf Otto famously called the mysterium tremendum.
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  24.  1
    Major Review: Miracles: God’s Presence and Power in Creation by Luke Timothy Johnson.Chad Hartsock - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):202-204.
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  25.  1
    The Good, the God, and the Ugly: The Role of the Beloved Monster in the Ancient Near East and the Hebrew Bible.Ryan S. Higgins - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):132-145.
    Ancient Near Eastern texts teem with horrifying and grotesque beings that pose some significant threat to the cosmos, humanity, and its institutions. Adopting Noël Carroll’s definition, such beings are monsters: interstitial not only physiologically and ontologically, but also cosmically and morally. This essay takes a comparative and literary approach to beloved monsters in Ugaritic, Mesopotamian, and Hebrew Bible texts. It suggests that in Ugarit and Mesopotamia, such monsters play a crucial role in advancing the goals of antipathic heroes while maintaining (...)
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  26.  1
    Leviathan to Lucifer: What Biblical Monsters (Still) Reveal.Kelly J. Murphy - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):146-158.
    Monsters and the monstrous show up in Scripture and outside the pages of Scripture. Two of the most famous biblical monsters—Leviathan and Satan—appear and reappear in different forms, and, at times, their stories are merged into one. A focus on Leviathan and Satan in Scripture helps readers to see the different ways the biblical texts depict monsters and, especially, the relationship between humans, monsters, and the divine. As these creatures appear in popular culture, often drawing on their scriptural representations, they (...)
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  27.  1
    On the Impossibility and Inevitability of Monsters in Biblical Thought.Kim Paffenroth - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):120-131.
    After general considerations of what constitutes a “monster,” this essay examines the examples of “monsters” in the Bible, showing that the Bible does not as frequently depict such beings as do other mythologies. The implications of this for understanding the biblical outlook on creation in general are considered, leading to the conclusion that in fact, in the Bible, it is God who is a monster, or at least, on the side of monsters, and is not to be relied on to (...)
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  28.  3
    Mapping the End: On Monsters and Maps in the Book of Revelation.Tina Pippin - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):183-196.
    The Book of Revelation is a map of the end time. Its apocalyptic story is full of monsters, from the throne room to the abyss. Using new studies in literary cartography and spatiality studies, I argue that the text of Revelation can be read as a map, and that it is itself a monster.
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  29. Constructing Imperial and National Identities: Monstrous and Human Bodies in Book of Watchers, Daniel, and 2 Maccabees.Anathea Portier-Young - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):159-170.
    Monster theory illuminates the construction of imperial and national identities in the portrayals of monstrous and human bodies in three early Jewish texts; Book of Watchers, Daniel, and 2 Maccabees. Book of Watchers expresses anxiety about Judean/Jewish identity in the shadow of empire through its portrayal of a vulnerable humanity terrorized by voracious giants and their demonic spirits. Daniel dehumanizes empire and its agents, imaging empire as a colossal statue, an animalistic were-king, and a series of monstrous beasts, while one (...)
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  30.  1
    Genesis 1.Katy Rigler - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):197-198.
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  31. Revelation 13:11–18.Alan Sherouse - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (2):199-201.
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  32.  4
    Dedication.Samuel L. Adams - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):5-5.
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  33.  1
    Major Review: The Old Testament is Dying: A Diagnosis and Recommended Treatment by Brent A. Strawn.Brennan Breed - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):79-81.
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  34.  1
    The Dance of Redemption and the Women’s March: A Choreography and a Conversation.Valerie Elverton Dixon - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):46-51.
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  35.  1
    Major Review: Redeeming Transcendence in the Arts: Bearing Witness to the Triune God by Jeremy Begbie.William Dyrness - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):84-86.
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  36.  2
    John 4:1–42.Larry L. Enis - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):71-73.
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  37.  1
    Katie Cannon’s Enduring Contribution to Christian Ethics.David P. Gushee - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):23-30.
    Katie Cannon is described as the creator of womanist ethics, a once-new, now permanent part of the field of Christian ethics. Ten themes in her work are named, and the author elaborates on how each of these themes has worked its way into his own understanding of Christian ethics.
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  38.  1
    Major Review: Roots Matter: Healing History, Honoring Heritage, Renewing Hope by Paula Owens Parker.Alison Gise Johnson - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):77-78.
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  39.  2
    I Come From A Place: Reflections on Katie Cannon’s Womanist Classroom.Charlene Jin Lee - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):31-37.
    This essay honors the teaching legacy of Katie Geneva Cannon. The renowned social ethicist, theologian, and womanist scholar was foremost a beloved teacher. Her former student reflects on Cannon’s embodied teaching praxis that contends for the historical survival of the particular self. Weaving personal narrative and curriculum theory, the essay supplies intimate glimpses into the expansive and liberative learning space Cannon nurtured in her classrooms.
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  40. Katie Cannon’s Non-Canonical Canon.Peter J. Paris - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):17-22.
    This essay provides a broad overview of Katie Geneva Canon’s contribution to Christian Social Ethics by introducing womanist thought to theological and ethical studies.
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  41. Luke 5:1–11.Paula Owens Parker - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):68-70.
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  42. Major Review: An Early History of Compassion: Emotion and Imagination in Hellenistic Judaism by Françoise Mirguet.F. Scott Spencer - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):82-83.
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  43.  1
    Romans 12:1–8.James Taneti - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):74-76.
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  44. Cross Exposure: Narrative Healthcare and Dr. Katie Geneva Cannon’s Womanist Theology of the Cross.Andrew Taylor-Troutman - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):38-45.
    This essay begins with a brief meditation on the meaning of “Good” Friday, the Christian day of remembrance of the torturous death of Jesus, then shifts to apply the multiplicity of meanings of the term “exposure” to the appendix in Dr. Cannon’s book Katie’s Canon. Dr. Cannon’s intensely personal narrative about her childhood becomes an invitation for readers to consider their own life stories, as demonstrated by a case study from a Narrative Healthcare workshop. While womanist theology has identified problematic (...)
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  45.  1
    Between the World and Me: Rituals for Crossing Over, in Memory of Dr. Katie Geneva Cannon.Linda E. Thomas - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):52-59.
    Katie Cannon’s scholarship offers commentary, challenges, and cautions, and it provides sources and norms that constitute a hermeneutic for Black women’s moral agency. She advances intellectual freedom through visionary, if not unorthodox, teaching and performance that leads to revolutionary possibilities. She foregrounds the varied ways of knowing passed on to us by ancient and sage folkways and lived morals by drawing on classic oral texts.
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  46. Black Womanist Consciousness: Economic and Border Thoughts.Emilie M. Townes - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):9-16.
    This essay uses Katie Geneva Cannon’s notion of Black womanist consciousness as a methodological tool to discuss the contours of our contemporary economic and immigration debates.
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  47. Katie Geneva Cannon Was a Waymaker.Reggie L. Williams - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):60-67.
    Faith must be guided by norms that emphasize justice, communal uplift, and collective well-being. A Christian concern for justice allows for vision that sees oppression and honors the image of God in the face of all of God’s children. The Rev. Dr. Cannon was a waymaker who helped figure that out.
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