Film-Philosophy

ISSN: 1466-4615

30 found

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  1.  4
    The Cinematic Anthropocene and the Future Politics of Killing.Gregers Andersen - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):394-410.
    This article considers two films, Elysium and What Happened to Monday, in order to demonstrate that they foreshadow a paradigmatic shift in the relationship between biopolitics and thanatopolitics. According to Michel Foucault, and later Giorgio Agamben and Roberto Esposito, it is chiefly the association of humans with biological danger that causes biopolitics to mutate into thanatopolitics. However, in these two films, humans are construed as an ecological danger that prompt thanatopolitics. They depict futures in which the regimes in power act (...)
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  2.  7
    The Availability of Jim Jarmusch’s Film-Philosophy: Wittgenstein, Derrida and Private Language in Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai.Kyle Barrowman - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):352-374.
    To date, film scholars have found the films of Jim Jarmusch to be tantamount to works of postmodern philosophy. For as intriguing and productive as such interpretations of Jarmusch’s films have been, I submit that the postmodern framework occludes a crucial aspect of Jarmusch’s film-philosophy, namely, his investment in the ordinary. From this perspective, I intend to show the availability of Jarmusch’s films to Wittgensteinian interpretation. More specifically, I plan to situate Jarmusch’s arthouse action film Ghost Dog: The Way of (...)
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  3.  2
    Michel Serres, Topology and Folded Time in Christopher Nolan's Dunkirk.Kevin Hunt - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):308-330.
    This article discusses Michel Serres's topological thinking and his approach to space and time from a film studies perspective, specifically looking at connections between Serresian philosophy and the work of Christopher Nolan, using Dunkirk as an example of folded time. The article provides a selective overview of Serres's topological thinking, which opposes a geometrical approach to space and time, as well as indicating connections between Serresian thought and film studies more broadly. Serres makes frequent use of visual metaphors that rely (...)
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  4.  4
    Robert Pippin (2020) Filmed Thought: Cinema as Reflective Form.Shawn Loht - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):436-440.
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  5.  2
    Ewa Mazierska and Lars Kristensen (Eds.) (2020) Third Cinema, World Cinema and Marxism.A. I. Philip - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):444-447.
  6.  2
    Truth, Beauty and Goodness: Freedom and the Platonic Triad in Eric Rohmer’s Film Theory.Hanne Schelstraete - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):331-351.
    This article analyses Eric Rohmer’s film theory in the light of the Platonic triad of truth, beauty and goodness, as embodied by the aesthetic philosophy of Kant, Hegel and Schiller. Although his film theory shows affinity with Kant’s ideal of art as a form of natural beauty, I will argue that a broader look at Rohmer’s philosophical foundations is necessary. The point where Rohmer’s film theory deviates from Kant’s triadic philosophy is exactly the point where he approaches the aesthetics of (...)
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  7.  1
    Nico Baumbach (2019) Cinema/Politics/Philosophy.Tyler Theus - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):432-435.
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  8.  4
    The Matter of Manual Traces: Letters, Photographs and Bean Paste in Naomi Kawase’s Cinema of Touch.Lydia Tuan - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):285-307.
    This article explores the representation of the hand in three recent fiction films by Naomi Kawase: Sweet Bean, Radiance and True Mothers. Extending current scholarship that discusses the director’s use of haptic visuality, I argue that Kawase’s haptic cinema further exhibits its hapticity by framing the hand as both a Derridean trace and conduit that leaves behind traces in objects such as bean paste, letters, photo cameras, and photographs. Kawase’s framing of these objects in close-up shots emphasizes not only their (...)
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  9.  1
    David Lynch, Embodiment and Mediality: Dealing With a Human Form.Benedict Welch - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):375-393.
    This article considers the role of disembodiment in the visual art and films of David Lynch. This line of inquiry, I argue, allows us to consider the ways scholars do and do not conceptualise the relationship between Lynch’s works of different mediums. Specifically, I pursue the conviction that Lynch’s preoccupation with an injured or fragmented body corresponds to his intermedial creative practice. I turn my attention to Lynch’s early short film The Alphabet which exemplifies how the violence inflicted on the (...)
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  10.  2
    Hans Maes and Katrien Schaubroeck (2021) (Eds.) Before Sunrise, Before Sunset, Before Midnight: A Philosophical Exploration.James Zborowski - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):441-443.
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  11.  4
    Immortality, the Good Life and Romantic Love in Groundhog Day and Only Lovers Left Alive.Rick Zinman - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (3):411-431.
    Groundhog Day and Only Lovers Left Alive are fantasy films that use the device of practical immortality in order to raise important philosophical questions about what constitutes a good life and to explore the nature of romantic love. Groundhog Day provides fairly conventional answers about how to live a good life by focusing on issues of spiritual redemption, selflessness, and developing one’s human potential. In contrast, Lovers provides a dark portrayal of a civilization on the brink of extinction but offers (...)
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  12.  9
    Kant and Burke’s Sublime in Werner Herzog’s Films: The Quest for an Ecstatic Truth1.Patrícia Castello Branco - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):149-170.
    The German filmmaker Werner Herzog controversially associates “truth” and “reality” in film with Kant’s notion of the sublime by explicitly treating the sublime as a key element in developing his notion of ecstatic truth. I critically examine Herzog’s interpretation of Kant’s sublime and the relations he establishes between the sublime and his own key aesthetic notion of ecstatic truth. I examine how the sublime in Herzog’s films arises from encounters with the overwhelming force and power of nature experienced by his (...)
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  13.  4
    Receptivity, Simultaneity: The Thin Red Line as Ecological Cinematic Poesis.Paul W. Burch - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):242-266.
    I adapt Robert Sinnerbrink's notion of cinematic poesis by arguing that Terrence Malick's The Thin Red Line constitutes an example of ecological cinematic poesis: a style of filmmaking that works in concert with the limits and potentialities of the filmmaking as a medium. This cinematic bearing emerges in a new way following Malick's return to Hollywood, where a combination of factors spur the emergence of a radical Emersonian practice of cinematic receptivity. I draw on oral histories, and the film itself, (...)
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  14.  4
    Lúcia Nagib (2020) Realist Cinema as World Cinema: Non-Cinema, Intermedial Passages, Total Cinema.Navid Darvishzadeh - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):267-271.
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  15.  9
    Disgust, Race and Ideology in Carl Franklin’s Devil in a Blue Dress.Dan Flory - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):103-129.
    This article uses Carl Plantinga’s and Noël Carroll’s theorizations regarding cinematic disgust to analyze Carl Franklin’s 1995 film noir, Devil in a Blue Dress. Plantinga argues for a link between disgust and ideology that helps to reveal deeper cultural significance in film, which Carroll’s work likewise supports. Plantinga further argues that disgust in art may be strangely attractive as well as repulsive, thereby eliciting reflection. I argue that combining these elements with philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah’s explanation of how moral revolutions (...)
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  16.  5
    The Disrobing of Aphrodite: Brigitte Bardot in Le Mépris.Oisín Keohane - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):171-195.
    This article examines a number of philosophical concepts that are at stake in the visual culture of the nude. It particularly focuses on Aphrodite’s appearance, or rather, what I call her exposed concealment, in Jean-Luc Godard’s 1963 Le Mépris. A film, I argue, which is not only concerned with Aphrodite and the figure of the female nude via Brigitte Bardot, but which also explores the very idea of the sex goddess in cinema. In the first section I introduce arguments from (...)
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  17.  4
    Humility and Greatness in Damien Chazelle’s First Man.Sylvie Magerstaedt - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):130-148.
    While philosophical debates about the ethical dimension of cinema have flourished over the last few decades, discussions of cinema and virtues are still limited. And, even if virtues are explored with regard to film, humility is not often the most obvious virtue that comes to mind. As this article argues, this might in part be due to humility’s lack of expressive action and its tendency to remain in the background. In addition, the wide range of philosophical views on what actually (...)
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  18.  3
    Gilberto Perez (2019) The Eloquent Screen: A Rhetoric of Film.James Mulvey - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):276-279.
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  19.  3
    Shane Denson (2020), Discorrelated Images.Christian de Mouilpied Sancto - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):272-275.
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  20.  16
    David Huckvale (2020) Terrors of the Flesh: The Philosophy of Body Horror in Film.Kristina Šekrst - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):280-283.
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  21.  8
    Hegel and Hitchcock’s Vertigo: On Reconciliation.Dylan Shaul - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):196-218.
    This article reconstructs and evaluates a debate between Pippin and Žižek over the proper interpretation of Hitchcock’s Vertigo, in relation to Hegel’s concept of reconciliation. Both Pippin and Žižek agree that Vertigo exemplifies Hegelian reconciliation: Scottie exhibits Hegel’s reconciliatory “negation of negation” when he realizes that his lost love Madeleine had really been Judy all along, thereby losing his original loss. Yet Pippin and Žižek disagree on the precise significance of the concept of reconciliation both for the film and for (...)
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  22.  5
    Robert Breer’s Perpetual Motion Machine.Dong Yang - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (2):219-241.
    Embodying and balancing the European avant-garde movement of the 1920s and the dialectical U.S. neo-avant-garde aesthetics of the 1960s, Robert Breer encompassed various art forms in his painting,...
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  23.  7
    Mendacity, Rule Consequentialist Ethics and The Ploughman's Lunch.Jonathan Bolton - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (1):26-43.
    This article examines Ian McEwan's script for director Richard Eyre's film, The Ploughman's Lunch, the title of which alludes to a deceptive, post-World War II advertising campaign that promulgated a false narrative about British tradition. McEwan's script, and Eyre's film adaptation of it, offer a prescient exposé of Britain's culture of mendacity in the 1980s in ways that draw on rule-consequentialist ethics to maintain that lying on the personal, professional, and political level has a pernicious effect on society. McEwan's work (...)
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  24.  11
    Eliza Steinbock (2019) Shimmering Images: Trans Cinema, Embodiment, and the Aesthetic of Change.William Brown - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (1):94-97.
  25.  9
    Hunter Vaughan (2019) Hollywood's Dirtiest Secret: The Hidden Environmental Costs of the Movies.Georgie Carr - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (1):90-93.
  26.  13
    Time Metaphors in Film: Understanding the Representation of Time in Cinema.Silvana Dunat - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (1):1-25.
    According to conceptual metaphor theory, there are two basic metaphorical models for conceptualising time in terms of space: the ego-moving model maps our movement through space onto our imagined movement through time, while the time-moving model represents time as an entity moving through spatial locations, the ego being just a passive observer. The aim of this article is to investigate how time is conceptualized in film where ego, movement, time and space also play basic roles. I compare the two linguistic (...)
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  27.  6
    Transferring Suspiria: Historicism and Philosophies of Psychoanalytic Transference.Alexander Howard & Julian Murphet - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (1):63-85.
    Luca Guadagnino's Suspiria aggressively foregrounds a term from the discourse of psychoanalysis, now a relic of twentieth-century philosophical and psychological thought, with which to negot...
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  28.  8
    Two Cats, One Fish: The Animal, Leviathan and the Limits of Theory.Aldo Kempen - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (1):44-62.
    Animals populate our artistic and philosophical discourses in critical ways. From Jacques Derrida's or Karen Barad's cat, to Donna Haraway's dog, to the fish in Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Véréna Paravel's Leviathan, these animals feature heavily in discussions regarding limits – the limits of the human and thus its relation with non-humans, but also the limits of knowledge itself. Cute or dangerous, real or fantasised, dead or alive: in this article, I juxtapose the various ways that such animals confront us with (...)
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  29.  11
    Rebecca A. Sheehan (2020) American Avant-Garde Cinema's Philosophy of the In-Between.Giulia Rho - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (1):98-101.
  30.  4
    Rupert Read (2019) A Film-Philosophy of Ecology and Enlightenment.Rong Wan - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (1):86-89.
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