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  1.  2
    The Man Who Knew Too Much.Lawrence Cahoone - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (2):81-84.
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  2.  1
    Joseph Margolis – Pragmatist Realism Viewing Human Culture and Historicity.Jale N. Erzen - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (2):126-136.
    In his long and productive life Joseph Margolis approached many subjects that had been the concern of philosophy all through history. However, when his texts are read carefully it is clear that his main interest was to understand humanity and its cultural values. In my text I will first introduce Margolis philosophy in general and the underlying premises that he defended throughout his work, moving on to specific claims and arguments. I will pursue my analysis through several of Margolis’ texts (...)
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  3.  2
    History, Informally Speaking: Margolis’ Cultural Pragmatism.Serge Grigoriev - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (2):113-125.
    This essay aims to adumbrate the relationship between ordinary language, history, and cognition in Joseph Margolis’ pragmatist account of the historical constitution of the human, cultural world. It emphasizes the important connections between his arguments for the essentially practical grounding of all forms of cognitive activity; the existential primacy of the historically evolved ordinary language in the formation of aptly socialized human persons as well as of productively functioning human societies; the transformational role of consciousness in history, including the history (...)
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  4.  2
    The Point of Margolis’ Dissatisfaction with Peirce.R. W. Main - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (2):137-145.
    Margolis’ philosophical thought and career is framed by the pragmatism that dominated his early education and his vision of a “resurgent” pragmatism as the most promising direction for an increasingly eclectic Western philosophical tradition. This version of pragmatism is based on Peirce’s formulation of the pragmatic maxim, but Margolis sees the implications of that maxim as running counter to a central strand of Peirce’s own thought: fallibilism as an infinitist, self-correcting process of inquiry asymptotically tending toward to truth and reality. (...)
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  5.  1
    Tuesdays (and Thursdays [and Sometimes Fridays or Saturdays]) with Joe.Austin Rooney - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (2):146-150.
    The piece shares reminiscences of the recently deceased Joseph Margolis. Margolis’s character, pedagogy, and contribution to the philosophical world are considered. Margolis was an important, maverick thinker whose impact on the philosophical community has yet to be fully understood.
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  6.  1
    The Significance of Joseph Margolis to Late 20th and Early 21st Century Pragmatism.Jay Schulkin - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (2):85-90.
    Joseph Margolis’ philosophical work is both sanguine and fair. It is sanguine because much of it captures the inherent worth and dignity of the human condition. This includes aesthetics, anthropological diversity and history, the diversity of cognitive orientations and objectivity without foundations. Margolis embraces science and naturalism without reductionism. His pragmatism, though, is rooted more in James’ perspectivism, his local nice adaptation, and his relativism than that of Peirce and Dewey and their sense of science and the community of inquirers. (...)
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  7.  2
    Pragmatism and Interpretation: Radical, Relativistic, but Not Unruly.Richard Shusterman - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (2):91-112.
    Interpretation has been a key theme in pragmatist aesthetics, but its centrality in neopragmatist thinking goes far beyond the field of art. Its influence extends into epistemology, ontology, and the philosophies of language, history, selfhood, and culture. Joseph Margolis devoted many articles and even an entire book to this topic, which he titled Interpretation Radical but Not Unruly. My critical examination of Margolis’s theory of interpretation shows how it is radical not only in terms of its robust relativism. It is (...)
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  8.  3
    The American Republic: William James on Political Leadership.Jacob L. Goodson & Quinlan C. Stein - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (1):35-58.
    Since Plato’s Republic, philosophers have outlined their expectations for political leaders and have offered judgments on the actions and decisions made by political leaders in their given context. It turns out that the American philosopher, William James, participates in this philosophical tradition. Although it has been assumed by professional philosophers—and even scholars of William James’s work—that James has no political philosophy, we argue that James’s political philosophy becomes both practical and useful for making judgments about and against political leaders.
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  9.  1
    The Relationship Between Moral Philosophy and Political Philosophy in William James.Colin Koopman - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (1):1-10.
    This review essay is occasioned by two books on the moral and political thought of William James. Sarin Marchetti’s Ethics and Philosophical Critique in William James and Trygve Throntveit’s William James and the Quest for an Ethical Republic pose crucial questions for how we are to frame, interpret, and assess the philosophical contributions of William James more than one hundred years after his passing. In offering interpretations of James as contributing to social and political questions through his moral philosophy, both (...)
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  10.  2
    In Extremis: The Wildness of William James.Alexander Livingston - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (1):23-34.
    William James advocates strenuousness as the key to the moral life yet his hunger for extreme experiences sometimes leads him to risk sacrificing morality in their pursuit. This paradox is best represented by James’s fascination with soldiers and warfare as exemplars of the strenuous life. This essay examines the tension between strenuousness and morality in James’s ethical thought through the lens of his celebration of wildness. Wildness, I argue, names the hungry craving for meaning, lust for intense, novel, and risky (...)
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  11.  1
    Ethics at the Crossroads: Replies to Koopman, Livingston, and Slater.Sarin Marchetti - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (1):68-80.
    In this article I address a number of issues raised by Colin Koopman, Alex Livingston, and Michael Slater to my reading of James’s ethics as defended in my 2015 book having to do with, in turn, the relationship between ethics and politics, ethics and psychological types, and ethics and religion. In accounting for these charges, I vindicate and further qualify my interpretation of James as a moral therapist.
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  12. Throntveit, Marchetti, and the Secularization of James’s Ethical Thought.Michael R. Slater - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (1):11-22.
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  13.  1
    Jamesian Ethics: A Working Model.Trygve Throntveit - 2022 - Contemporary Pragmatism 19 (1):59-67.
    In this essay I respond to critical readers of my book, William James and the Quest for an Ethical Republic. I argue that James’s ultimate preoccupations are ethical, and that his ethical and moral writings constitute a rich resource for pluralistic societies seeking democratic tools for negotiating deep ideological, cultural, and religious differences, and for building a thriving commons.
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