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  1.  8
    From Existential Alterity to Ethical Reciprocity: Beauvoir’s Alternative to Levinas.Ellie Anderson - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (2):171-189.
    While Simone de Beauvoir’s theory of alterity has been the topic of much discussion within Beauvoir scholarship, feminist theory, and social and political philosophy, it has not commonly been a reference point for those working within ethics. However, Beauvoir develops a novel view that those concerned with the ethical import of respect for others should consider seriously, especially those working within the Levinasian tradition. I claim that Beauvoir distinguishes between two forms of otherness: namely, existential alterity and sociopolitical alterity. While (...)
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  2.  16
    Motor Intentionality and the Intentionality of Improvisation: A Contribution to a Phenomenology of Musical Improvisation.Lucia Angelino - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (2):203-224.
    The intentionality of improvisation represents surely one of the most pressing and controversial issues in contemporary action theory: how do we find the way to characterize the proper intentionality of improvisation, which is an unplanned yet intentional action? This article will address this question bringing together Merleau-Ponty’s motor intentionality and Bergson’s conception of duration. My argument will unfold in three main stages. First, I will briefly describe the traditional scheme that is used to think of intentional action in contemporary action (...)
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  3.  9
    Sensibility and the Otherness of the World: Levinas and Merleau-Ponty.Paula Lorelle - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (2):191-201.
    Sensibility has traditionally been defined as a relation with the world’s exteriority. However, a certain post-husserlian phenomenology tends to reverse this definition and to redefine sensibility as an internal relation that takes place from within the world. This article focuses on this phenomenological concept of “sensibility” in Levinas and Merleau-Ponty and intends to show that this concept rests upon the presupposition of an alternative according to which we would have whether a sensible experience of identity, or an acosmic experience of (...)
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  4.  9
    Kinesthesia: An Extended Critical Overview and a Beginning Phenomenology of Learning.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (2):143-169.
    This paper takes five different perspectives on kinesthesia, beginning with its evolution across animate life and its biological distinction from, and relationship to proprioception. It proceeds to document the historical derivation of “the muscle sense,” showing in the process how analytic philosophers bypass the import of kinesthesia by way of “enaction,” for example, and by redefinitions of “tactical deception.” The article then gives prominence to a further occlusion of kinesthesia and its subduction by proprioception, these practices being those of well-known (...)
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  5.  1
    Piper’s Question and Ours: A Role for Adversity in Group-Centred Views of Non-Agentive Shame.Basil Vassilicos - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (2):241-264.
    This paper aims to contribute to ‘group-centred views’ of non-agentive shame, by linking them to an ‘anepistemic’ model of the experience and impact of human failing. One of the most vexing aspects of those group-centred views remains how susceptivity to such shame ought to be understood. This contribution focuses on how a basic familiarity with adversity, in everyday life, may open individuals up to these forms of shame. If, per group-centred views, non-agentive shame is importantly driven by participation in social (...)
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  6.  6
    Comments on Johanna Oksala’s Feminist Experiences.Andreea Smaranda Aldea - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (1):125-134.
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  7.  3
    Feminism as Critique: Comments on Johanna Oksala’s Feminist Experiences.Amy Allen - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (1):115-123.
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  8.  19
    On Perception and Trust: Merleau-Ponty and the Emotional Significance of Our Relations with Others.Susan Bredlau - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (1):1-14.
    Our perception of the world and our relationships with other people are not, I argue, distinct activities. Focusing, first, on Merleau-Ponty’s description in the Phenomenology of Perception of his playful interaction with an infant, and, second, on contemporary research on the phenomena referred to as neonate imitation, joint attention, and mutual gaze, I argue that perception can be a collaborative endeavor. Moreover, this collaborative endeavor, which is definitive of both infant and adult perception, entails trust; our trust in others is (...)
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  9.  8
    ‘Estrangement’ in Aesthetics and Beyond: Russian Formalism and Phenomenological Method.Georgy Chernavin & Anna Yampolskaya - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (1):91-113.
    We investigate the parallelism between aesthetic experience and the practice of phenomenology using Viktor Shklovsky’s theory of “estrangement”. In his letter to Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Husserl claims that aesthetic and phenomenological experiences are similar; in the perception of a work of art we change our attitude in order to concentrate on how the things appear to us instead of what they are. A work of art “forces us into” the aesthetic attitude in the same way as the phenomenological epoché drives (...)
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  10.  28
    The Acephalic Community: Bataillean Sovereignty, the Question of Relation, and the Passage to the Subject.Andrey Gordienko - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (1):75-90.
    The present essay reconsiders Georges Bataille’s politics of the impossible in light of Jean-Luc Nancy’s and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe’s collaborative work conducted at the Centre for Philosophical Research on the Political. In particular, my submission critically assesses Nancy’s and Lacoue-Labarthe’s concerted effort to displace the problematic of the subject to make room for a new ground of the political derived from Bataillean conception of community. While Bataille’s philosophy proved to be decisive to Nancy’s and Lacoue-Labarthe’s exploratory research at the Centre, it (...)
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  11.  7
    Unconscious Reasons: Habermas, Foucault, and Psychoanalysis.A. Özgür Gürsoy - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (1):35-50.
    The Habermas–Foucault debate, despite the excellent commentary it has generated, has the standing of an ‘unfinished project’ precisely because it occasions the interrogation of the fundamental categories of modernity, and because the lingering sense of anxiety, which continues to remain after arguments and counter-arguments, demands new interpretations. Here, I advance the claim that what gives Habermas’s criticisms of Foucault’s histories and theoretical formulations their bite is the categorial distinction he maintains between facts and rights, and by extension, between causes and (...)
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  12.  6
    Feminist Experiences: A Response to Smaranda Aldea and Amy Allen.Johanna Oksala - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (1):135-142.
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  13.  23
    Killing the Father, Parmenides: On Lacan’s Anti-Philosophy.Matthew Sharpe - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (1):51-74.
    This paper examines the historical claims about philosophy, dating back to Parmenides, that we argue underlie Jacques Lacan’s polemical provocations in the mid-1970s that his position was an “anti-philosophie”. Following an introduction surveying the existing literature on the subject, in part ii, we systematically present the account of classical philosophy Lacan has in mind when he declares psychoanalysis to be an antiphilosophy after 1975, assembling his claims about the history of ideas in Seminars XVII and XX in ways earlier contributions (...)
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  14.  6
    The Relevance of the Theory of Pseudo-Culture.Vangelis Giannakakis - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 1 (First Online).
    Some 60 years separate us from Theodor W. Adorno’s “Theory of pseudo-culture.” Yet Adorno’s analysis might never have been as pertinent and as compelling as it is in the present moment. The dawn of the “post-truth” era, and the persistent impact of the culture industry on human sensibility and capacity for critical self-reflection, call for a return to Adorno’s critical theorisation of pseudo-culture. This paper revisits Adorno’s assessment of pseudo-culture and proposes a reconstruction of some of his most compelling arguments (...)
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  15.  3
    Forgiveness as Institution: A Merleau-Pontian Account.Bryan Lueck - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review (2):1-15.
    Recent literature on forgiveness suggests that a successful account of the phenomenon must satisfy at least three conditions: it must be able to explain how forgiveness can be articulate, uncompromising, and elective. These three conditions are not logically inconsistent, but the history of reflection on the ethics of forgiveness nonetheless suggests that they are in tension. Accounts that emphasize articulateness and uncompromisingness tend to suggest an excessively deflationary understanding of electiveness, underestimating the degree to which forgiveness is a gift. Accounts (...)
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  16.  13
    Attitudes and Illusions: Herbert Leyendecker’s Phenomenology of Perception.Kristjan Laasik - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review:1-20.
    In this paper, I discuss aspects of Herbert Leyendecker’s 1913 doctoral dissertation, Towards the Phenomenology of Deceptions, which he defended in 1913 at the University of Munich. Leyendecker was a member of the Munich and Göttingen Phenomenological Circles. In my discussion of his largely neglected views, I explore the connection between his ideas concerning “attitudes”, e.g., of searching for, observing, counting, or working with objects, and the central topic of his text, perceptual illusions, thematized by Leyendecker as a kind of (...)
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