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  1.  2
    Book Review: Gretel Van Wieren, Listening at Lookout Creek: Nature in Spiritual Practice Nathaniel Van Yperen, Gratitude for the Wild: Christian Ethics in the Wilderness. [REVIEW]Andrew D. Bowyer - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):274-279.
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  2.  3
    Evaluating the Theistic Implications of the Kantian Moral Argument That Postulating God is Essential to Moral Rationality.Zachary Breitenbach - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):143-157.
    I contend that Kant’s moral argument that postulates God and an afterlife in order to justify moral rationality counts strongly in favor of theistic ethics even though it cannot on its own justify that God exists. In moving toward this conclusion, I assess Kant’s moral argument and note how both Kant and the utilitarian Henry Sidgwick, in their own ways, recognize that morality cannot reasonably be seen as completely overriding if God and an afterlife are rejected. I then critique a (...)
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  3. Book Review: David McIlroy, The End of Law: How Law’s Claims Relate to Law’s Aims. [REVIEW]Allen Calhoun - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):271-274.
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  4.  2
    Sociological Self-Knowledge, Critical Realism, and Christian Ethics.David Cloutier - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):158-170.
    In his 2016 book, Ethics in the Conflicts of Modernity, Alasdair MacIntyre spends considerable time discussing how disputes between different moral theorists and different forms of practice might be adjudicated. A crucial addition to the tradition-constituted historical narrative approach of Whose Justice? Which Rationality? is his introduction of what he calls ‘sociological self-knowledge’. The present article outlines what MacIntyre means by this and suggests that his approach here dovetails well with Christian ethicists who have advocated the use of critical realist (...)
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  5. Book Review: Jennifer A. Herdt, Forming Humanity: Redeeming the German Bildung Tradition. [REVIEW]Michael A. Conway - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):265-267.
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  6. Book Review: Ron Haflidson, On Solitude, Conscience, Love and Our Inner and Outer Lives. [REVIEW]Anette Ejsing - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):260-263.
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  7. Book Review: Amy J. Erickson, Ephraim Radner, Hosean Wilderness, and the Church in the Post-Christendom West: A Dialogue on the Shape of Waiting. [REVIEW]Andrew Errington - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):257-260.
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  8.  1
    Ján Kollár’s Thoughts on Capital Punishment.Vasil Gluchman - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):171-189.
    This article analyses and assesses the arguments opposing capital punishment put forward by Ján Kollár, a representative of Central European Evangelical/Lutheran Enlightenment rationalism, using the definition of criminal practice in Europe at the turn of the nineteenth century as the basis. Consequently, the author pays attention to the movement for reform in criminal law and practices, initiated in Europe in the second half of the eighteenth century by Cesare Beccaria, including his argumentation against capital punishment. In this context, the author (...)
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  9.  1
    Book Review: Amy Laura Hall, Laughing at the Devil: Seeing the World with Julian of Norwich. [REVIEW]Robert W. Heimburger - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):263-265.
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  10. Book Review: Kent Dunnington, Humility, Pride, and Christian Virtue Theory. [REVIEW]Gaven Kerr - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):254-257.
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  11. Book Review: Mark Douglas, Christian Pacifism for an Environmental Age. [REVIEW]Hannah Malcolm - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):252-254.
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  12. Book Review: Sylvia C. Keesmaat and Brian J. Walsh, Romans Disarmed: Resisting Empire, Demanding Justice. [REVIEW]Patrick Mitchel - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):267-270.
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  13.  4
    Natural Law and Ethical Non-Naturalism.John D. O’Connor - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):190-208.
    There is a lack of clarity in the literature about what constitutes the natural law approach to ethics and what is incompatible with it. The standard, and largely historical, way of understanding the natural law approach risks overlooking theoretical differences of fundamental importance regarding what the natural law approach is usually taken to uphold. Against Craig Paterson, I argue that a necessary condition for an ethical account to uphold fully the natural law approach is that it does not contain any (...)
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  14. Book Review: Jonathan Cole, Christian Political Theology in an Age of Discontent: Mediating Scripture, Doctrine, and Political Reality. [REVIEW]Gianmarco Palermo & Peter Rožič Sj - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):246-248.
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  15. Book Review: Brian Brock and Bernd Wannenwetsch, The Therapy of the Christian Body: A Theological Exposition of Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians. [REVIEW]Lucy Peppiatt - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):241-244.
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  16.  4
    Kenotic Theologies and the Challenge of the ‘Anthropocene’: From Deep Incarnation to Interspecies Encounter.David S. Robinson & Jennifer Wotochek - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):209-222.
    As the detrimental effects of human agency loom large in the ‘Anthropocene’, theologians and philosophers have called for restraint by invoking the concept of kenosis. Although a ‘self-emptying’ form of life helps to counter the ways that humans are increasingly driving other species to extinction, we argue that such calls are often compromised by relying on notions of the Creator’s own attenuated or self-limited agency. They therefore trade in a competitive construal that is susceptible to the tendency of human agency (...)
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  17. Book Review: Bradley B. Burroughs, Christianity, Politics, and the Predicament of Evil: A Constructive Theological Ethic of Soulcraft and Statecraft. [REVIEW]Hank Spaulding - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):244-246.
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  18.  4
    Egocentricity, Organism, and Metaphysics: Sin and Renewal in Bavinck’s Ethics.Nathaniel Gray Sutanto - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):223-240.
    The recent discovery and translation of Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Ethics and the ongoing work on the sources and contours of his organic ontology create the impetus to relate these two trajectories together. The twin questions this article will be asking, precisely, are these: what is the logical relationship between Bavinck’s organic whole federalism, where ethical ties are ontologically constitutive, with his claim in the Reformed Ethics that sin’s organizing principle is the prioritization of the ego above all else? Further, how (...)
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  19. Egocentricity, Organism, and Metaphysics: Sin and Renewal in Bavinck’s Ethics 1.Nathaniel Gray Sutanto - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):223-240.
    The recent discovery and translation of Herman Bavinck’s Reformed Ethics and the ongoing work on the sources and contours of his organic ontology create the impetus to relate these two trajectories together. The twin questions this article will be asking, precisely, are these: what is the logical relationship between Bavinck’s organic whole federalism, where ethical ties are ontologically constitutive, with his claim in the Reformed Ethics that sin’s organizing principle is the prioritization of the ego above all else? Further, how (...)
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  20. Book Review: Simon Cuff, Love in Action: Catholic Social Teaching for Every Church. [REVIEW]Nicholas Townsend - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (2):248-252.
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  21. Book Review: David Hollenbach, SJ, Humanity in Crisis: Ethical and Religious Response to Refugees. [REVIEW]Barnabas Aspray - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):126-129.
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  22. Book Review: Jon Garvey, God’s Good Earth: The Case for an Unfallen Creation Chad Michael Rimmer, Greening the Children of God: Thomas Traherne and Nature’s Role in the Ecological Formation of Children. [REVIEW]Elizabeth S. Dodd - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):111-116.
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  23. Book Review: Mary L. Hirschfeld, Aquinas and the Market: Towards a Humane Economy. [REVIEW]James Halteman - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):123-126.
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  24. Book Review: Fabian Grassl, In the Face of Death: Thielicke—Theologian, Preacher, Boundary Rider. [REVIEW]Jeffery L. Hamm - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):116-119.
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  25. Book Review: Kevin Hargaden, Theological Ethics in a Neoliberal Age: Confronting the Christian Problem with Wealth and David Cloutier, The Vice of Luxury: Economic Excess in a Consumer Age. [REVIEW]Mary L. Hirschfeld - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):119-123.
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  26.  1
    Gender Identity in Scripture: Indissoluble Marriage and Exceptional Eunuchs.David Albert Jones - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):3-16.
    There has been little considered reflection by Catholic theologians on the concepts of gender identity, gender dysphoria and gender transition. Seeking inspiration in the Scriptures, some Catholic thinkers have interpreted the first three chapters of Genesis and especially the text ‘male and female he created them’ as requiring all human beings to live in the gender role congruent with their biological sex, and have viewed the biology of sex as self-evident. This article argues that these chapters constitute an appropriate locus (...)
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  27. Book Review: Peter Manley Scott, A Theology of Post-Natural Right. [REVIEW]Ryan Juskus - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):134-137.
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  28.  1
    Book Review: Debra Erickson and Michael Le Chevallier (Eds), Jean Bethke Elshtain: Politics, Ethics, and Society. [REVIEW]Mary M. Keys - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):109-111.
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  29.  2
    On Animals: An Extended Review of David Clough’s Two-Volume Work. [REVIEW]Ellen Grace Lesser & Christopher Southgate - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):88-98.
    David Clough’s two-volume work On Animals claims to be the first systematic Christian theological reflection on the place of nonhuman animals within creation which also provides an ethical reflection on what that might mean for our relationship with nonhuman animals in contemporary society. In this extended review, we provide a summary of the cumulative arguments across both volumes of On Animals before offering our reflections. While we agree with many though not all of Clough’s theological conclusions, we ultimately conclude that (...)
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  30. Book Review: John Webster, The Culture of Theology. [REVIEW]Matthew Mason - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):137-140.
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  31.  7
    Judging the Secret Thoughts of All: Functional Neuroimaging, ‘Brain Reading’, and the Theological Ethics of Privacy1.Neil Messer - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):17-35.
    Of the many futuristic prospects offered by neuroscience, one of the more controversial is ‘brain reading’: the use of functional neuroimaging to gain information about subjects’ mental states or thoughts. This technology has various possible applications, including ‘neuromarketing’ and lie detection. Would such applications violate subjects’ privacy rights? Conversely, if God knows and judges all our secret thoughts, do Christians have any stake in defending a right to mental privacy? This article argues that God’s knowledge of us is different not (...)
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  32. Judging the Secret Thoughts of All: Functional Neuroimaging, ‘Brain Reading’, and the Theological Ethics of Privacy 1.Neil Messer - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):17-35.
    Of the many futuristic prospects offered by neuroscience, one of the more controversial is ‘brain reading’: the use of functional neuroimaging to gain information about subjects’ mental states or thoughts. This technology has various possible applications, including ‘neuromarketing’ and lie detection. Would such applications violate subjects’ privacy rights? Conversely, if God knows and judges all our secret thoughts, do Christians have any stake in defending a right to mental privacy? This article argues that God’s knowledge of us is different not (...)
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  33.  1
    Book Review: Lisa Sowle Cahill, Blessed Are the Peacemakers: Pacifism, Just War, and Peacebuilding. [REVIEW]Tom Noakes-Duncan - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):102-105.
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  34.  3
    Green Purpose: Teleology, Ecological Ethics, and the Recovery of Contemplation.Andreas Nordlander - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):36-55.
    According to one influential narrative, a significant root of our ecological crisis is to be found in the Christian appropriation of teleology, undergirding the anthropocentrism endemic to Western thought. This article challenges this argument in three steps. First, I present the Aristotelian understanding of teleology, which is intrinsic to living organisms, and which has been suggested as a resource for ecological ethics. Second, I argue that the rejection of intrinsic teleology in favour of an extrinsic teleology first occurs with modern (...)
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  35. Book Review: Aaron P. Edwards and David J. Gouwens (Eds), T&T Clark Companion to the Theology of Kierkegaard. [REVIEW]Jacob Marques Rollison - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):105-109.
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  36. Book Review: Brian Brock, Wondrously Wounded: Theology, Disability, and the Body of Christ. [REVIEW]Medi Ann Volpe - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):99-102.
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  37. Strangers and Fellow Citizens: Perspectives on Immigration and Society.Thomas Wabel - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):56-75.
    The article sets out a critical assessment of recent public reactions in Germany upon taking in large numbers of refugees since 2015, which have been swaying between moralisation and resentment. In this situation, public theology should ask how hospitality is linked to the perceived identity of a society and to its perception of who belongs, and what role Christianity might play in these debates. Drawing on a phenomenological perspective within contemporary German philosophy, and contrasting this perspective with historical and contemporary (...)
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  38. Book Review: Karen R. Keen, Scripture, Ethics, and the Possibility of Same-Sex Relationships. [REVIEW]Jon Waind - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):129-134.
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  39.  4
    Reformed Aesthetics and Disability Ethics: The Potential Contribution of Nicholas Wolterstorff1.Luke Zerra - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):76-87.
    Nicholas Wolterstorff has presented an account of justice that has important implications for disability. He does not ground rights in intellectual capacities. Instead, rights are justly owed by virtue of the inherent worth bestowed by God to humanity, thereby protecting those with severe intellectual disabilities. Wolterstorff’s aesthetics, I claim, offer a vision for how these rights are rendered. By describing art as a social practice wherein justice can be rendered, and by describing justice as essential to Christian liturgy, Wolterstorff allows (...)
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  40. Reformed Aesthetics and Disability Ethics: The Potential Contribution of Nicholas Wolterstorff 1.Luke Zerra - 2021 - Studies in Christian Ethics 34 (1):76-87.
    Nicholas Wolterstorff has presented an account of justice that has important implications for disability. He does not ground rights in intellectual capacities. Instead, rights are justly owed by virtue of the inherent worth bestowed by God to humanity, thereby protecting those with severe intellectual disabilities. Wolterstorff’s aesthetics, I claim, offer a vision for how these rights are rendered. By describing art as a social practice wherein justice can be rendered, and by describing justice as essential to Christian liturgy, Wolterstorff allows (...)
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