Journal of Moral Education

ISSNs: 0305-7240, 1465-3877

9 found

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  1.  4
    Inspiring or annoying? A new measure of broadening and defensive self-regulatory responses to moral exemplars applied to two real-life scenarios of moral goodness.Antonio Fabio Bella - 2024 - Journal of Moral Education 53 (1):31-55.
    ABSTRACT I present a new model of the self-regulation of virtue that integrates perspectives on emotion, cognition, and motivation. Across three vignette-based studies in US/uk (N = 1,540), I developed through exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis a multi-item measure of broadening and defensive responses, the Self-Regulation of Virtue Inventory (SRVI). I applied that measurement model to two new scenarios portraying prototypical moral exemplars (selected from a set of 12) and fitted structural models that identify key antecedents: motivational dispositions (regulatory focus (...)
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  2.  7
    David Carr at eighty: Fifty years of dedication to academic research and teaching about philosophy of (moral) education.Doret de Ruyter - 2024 - Journal of Moral Education 53 (1):215-217.
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  3.  13
    The harms of unattainable pedagogical exemplars on social media.Gerry Dunne & Alkis Kotsonis - 2024 - Journal of Moral Education 53 (1):56-72.
    ABSTRACT This paper scrutinizes the nature and scope of deleterious consequences arising from the pursuit of unattainable pedagogical exemplars on social media. We cash out this phenomenon using exemplarist theory to emphasize the fact that social media (e.g., Facebook, Instagram, TikTok) are platforms in which the vast majority of users present idealized and curated versions of themselves. We focus specifically on educational practitioners and show that attempting to emulate unattainable pedagogical exemplars has negative impacts on agents’ emotional well-being: It can (...)
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  4. Relatable and attainable moral exemplars as sources for moral elevation and pleasantness.Hyemin Han & Kelsie J. Dawson - 2024 - Journal of Moral Education 53 (1):14-30.
    ABSTRACT In the present study, we examined how the perceived attainability and relatability of moral exemplars predicted moral elevation and pleasantness among both adult and college student participants. Data collected from two experiments were analyzed with Bayesian multilevel modeling to explore which factors significantly predicted outcome variables at the story level. The analysis results demonstrated that the main effect of perceived relatability and the interaction effect between attainability and relatability shall be included in the best prediction model, and thus, were (...)
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  5.  8
    Special issue on exemplars and emulation in moral education: Guest editorial.Emerald Henderson - 2024 - Journal of Moral Education 53 (1):1-13.
    ABSTRACT This is a guest editorial introducing a special issue on ‘Exemplars and Emulation in Moral Education’ which contains contributions from 10 multidisciplinary authors. Representing the state of the art in the discourse, this editorial elucidates several new themes pertaining to it, before outlining each contribution in relation to said themes. In light of David Carr’s recent objections to role modelling, it is then argued that these contributions provide a possible collective response.
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  6.  16
    Mental images and imagination in moral education.Wojciech Kaftanski - 2024 - Journal of Moral Education 53 (1):119-138.
    ABSTRACT This article argues for a unique role of imagination and mental images in the moral education of students. Imagination is rendered here as a capacity oriented toward realizable and salient goals; mental images are understood as particular future-oriented self-representations (FOSRs) devised by and held in imagination. FOSRs have four moral attributes: they are 1) expressive of us as moral agents, 2) shape our moral identity, 3) serve as moral pointers, and 4) help devise mitigating strategies. FOSRs can be created (...)
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  7.  5
    Exploring the moral exemplarity of Greta Thunberg.Jani Pulkki, Lauri Lahikainen, Jan Varpanen & Anette Mansikka-aho - 2024 - Journal of Moral Education 53 (1):195-214.
    ABSTRACT Linda Zagzebski’s exemplarist moral theory has gained traction in recent years as a valid approach to moral education. Insufficient attention has so far been paid to questions about who we should count among exemplary people to be emulated. In this paper, we make the case for considering the Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg as one moral exemplar for the contemporary world. Since Thunberg is a controversial figure, we not only argue in positive terms why Thunberg would make a good (...)
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  8.  10
    Adolescents’ moral self-cultivation through emulation: Implications for modelling in moral education.Wouter Sanderse - 2024 - Journal of Moral Education 53 (1):139-156.
    ABSTRACT This paper aims to offer a new perspective on role modelling by examining adolescents’ own efforts to lead a morally virtuous life. While traditional approaches to moral education emphasize the importance of teachers as role models, this study proposes a shift in focus towards adolescents’ own role models. Drawing on the philosophical concept of moral self-cultivation and psychological insights on identity development and social cognitive learning, it is argued that adolescents have the ability to cultivate their moral character by (...)
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  9.  6
    Mentorship programs in schools: Bridging the Character Education Gap.Barbara Whitlock - 2024 - Journal of Moral Education 53 (1):89-118.
    ABSTRACT Amidst trends that emphasize languishing patterns in teen mental health, there is a bright spot: social science research indicates that adolescents who develop relationships with adult mentors demonstrate increased signs of flourishing. This social science research on mentors, though limited to school performance outcome goals, offers a lifeline to character educators. I offer a theoretical framework based on Aristotelian principles, informed by anecdotal case studies of authentic moral dilemmas that emerged from the direct experiences of mentees, to suggest a (...)
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