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  1.  14
    Arguing About Free Will: Lewis and the Consequence Argument.Danilo Šuster - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (63):375-403.
    I explore some issues in the logics and dialectics of practical modalities connected with the Consequence Argument (CA) considered as the best argument for the incompatibility of free will and determinism. According to Lewis (1981) in one of the possible senses of (in)ability, the argument is not valid; however, understood in the other of its possible senses, the argument is not sound. This verdict is based on the assessment of the modal version of the argument, where the crucial notion is (...)
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  2.  5
    Art and the Impossible.Boran Berčić - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (61):155-177.
    In this article author contrasts possibilism (the view that art is about the logically possible and that it cannot be about the impossible) with impos- sibilism (the view that art can be and sometimes is about the logically impossible as well). Author argues in favor of possibilism. The main insight is that since impossible objects are necessarily non-existent art cannot be about them, it has to be about something that can exist. Also, author formulates five more detailed views about the (...)
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  3.  74
    Learning From Fiction to Change Our Personal Narratives.Andrew J. Corsa - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (61):93-109.
    Can fictional literature help us lead better lives? This essay argues that some works of literature can help us both change our personal narratives and develop new narratives that will guide our actions, enabling us to better achieve our goals. Works of literature can lead us to consider the hypothesis that we might beneficially change our future-oriented, personal narratives. As a case study, this essay considers Ben Lerner’s novel, 10:04, which focuses on humans’ ability to develop new narratives, and which (...)
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  4. Implicitness, Logical Form and Arguments.Martina Blečić - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):405-418.
    In the paper I suggest that a loose notion of logical form can be a useful tool for the understanding or evaluation of everyday language and the explicit and implicit content of communication. Reconciling ordinary language and logic provides formal guidelines for rational communication, giving strength and order to ordinary communication and content to logical schemas. The starting point of the paper is the idea that the bearers of logical form are not natural language sentences, but what we communicate with (...)
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  5. Jonathan Gilmore, Apt Imaginings, Feelings for Fictions and Other Creatures of the Mind. [REVIEW]David Grčki - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):439-441.
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  6. Wolfgang Huemer and Ingrid Vendrell Ferran (Eds.), Beauty: New Essays in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. [REVIEW]Iris Vidmar Jovanović - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):442-445.
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  7. Argumentation as a Speech Act.Paolo Labinaz - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):357-374.
    This paper investigates whether, and if so, in what way, argumentation can be profitably described in speech-act theoretical terms. I suggest that the two theories of argumentation that are supposed to provide the most elaborate analysis of it in speech-act theoretical terms both suffer from the same two flaws: firstly, their “illocutionary act pluralism” assumption and secondly, a lack of interest in where arguing belongs in the classification of illocutionary acts. I argue that these flaws derive from the authors’ reliance (...)
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  8.  3
    Ivan Cerovac, Epistemic Democracy and Political Legitimacy. [REVIEW]Iva Martinić - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):446-449.
  9. On Formalizing Logical Modalities.Luigi Pavone - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):419-430.
    This paper is in the scope of the philosophy of modal logic; more precisely, it concerns the semantics of modal logic, when the modal elements are interpreted as logical modalities. Most authors have thought that the logic for logical modality—that is, the one to be used to formalize the notion of logical truth —is to be found among logical systems in which modalities are allowed to be iterated. This has raised the problem of the adequacy, to that formalization purpose, of (...)
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  10. The Intuition Behind the Non-Identity Problem.Matej Sušnik - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):431-438.
    This paper examines a well-known non-identity case of a mother who chooses to conceive a blind child instead of a sighted one. While some people accept the non-identity argument and claim that we should reject the intuition that the mother’s act is morally wrong, others hold onto that intuition and try to find a fault in the non-identity argument. This paper proposes a somewhat middle approach. It is argued that the conclusion of the non-identity argument is not necessarily in conflict (...)
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  11.  2
    Aesthetic Eating.Adam Andrzejewski - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):269-284.
    The aim of this paper is to sketch a framework for perceiving the act of consumption as an aesthetic phenomenon. I shall argue that, under some circumstances, it is possible to receive aesthetic satisfaction from the act of eating food, in which the object of one’s appreciation is, for the most part, considered separately from what is actually eaten. I propose to call such a process “aesthetic eating” and argue that due to its aesthetic autonomy it might be a potential (...)
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  12.  77
    J. S. Mill on Higher Pleasures and Modes of Existence.Tim Beaumont - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (2(62)):251-68.
    The passage of Mill’s Utilitarianism that sets out the condition in which one pleasure has a superior quality than another stokes interpretive controversy. According to the Lexical Interpretation, Mill takes one pleasure, P1, to be of a superior quality than another, P2, if, and only if, the smallest quantity of P1 is more valuable than any finite quantity of P2. This paper argues that, while the Lexical Interpretation may be supported with supplementary evidence, the passage itself does not rule out (...)
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  13.  5
    Are Capabilities Compatible with Political Liberalism? A Third Way.Thom Brooks - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):237-250.
    This article explores the relationship between capabilities and political liberalism. There are two views about how they might be compatible: Sen claims capabilities should be seen as a revision of primary goods while Nussbaum argues capabilities should form part of an overlapping consensus. It is argued they are both right—and incorrect. Whereas Sen identifies where compatibility might best be found, it is Nussbaum’s conception of capabilities that is able to overcome Rawls’s objections to Sen’s proposal. This provides a new third (...)
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  14. Two Accounts of the Problem of Enhanced Control.Damir Čičić - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):301-318.
    According to event-causal libertarianism, an action is free in the sense relevant to moral responsibility when it is caused indeterministically by an agent’s beliefs, desires, intentions, or by their occurrences. This paper attempts to clarify one of the major objections to this theory: the objection that the theory cannot explain the relevance of indeterminism to this kind of freedom. Christopher Evan Franklin has argued that the problem of explaining the relevance of indeterminism to free will arises because it is difficult (...)
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  15. J. David Velleman, On Being Me: A Personal Invitation to Philosophy. [REVIEW]Ana Grgić - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):353-355.
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  16.  2
    The Problem with Impure Infinitism.Husein Inusah - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):339-351.
    It is generally believed that pure versions of infinitism face two problems, namely: 1) they are unable to distinguish between potential and actual series of justified reasons because they are defined strictly in terms of relations between beliefs in the series so that every succeeding belief is justified by the belief before it and so on ad infinitum and, 2) they are unable to mark the difference between a set of justified reasons that are connected to truth and one that (...)
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  17.  1
    The Priority of Common Sense in Philosophy.Martin Nuhlíček - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):319-337.
    The aim of this paper is to explore the issue of priority of common sense in philosophy. It is divided into four parts. The first part discusses examples of common-sense beliefs and indicates their specific nature, especially compared to mere common beliefs. The second part explores in more detail the supposed positive epistemic status of common-sense beliefs and the role they play in delimiting plausible philosophical theories. The third part overviews a few attempts to formulate a legitimate argument, or justification, (...)
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  18. Chomsky’s London.Zoltán Vecsey - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):285-299.
    Semantic externalism is the view according to which proper names and other nominals have the capacity to refer to language-independent objects. On this view, the proper name ‘London’ is related semantically to a worldly object, London. Chomsky’s long held position is that this relational conception of reference is untenable. According to his internalist framework, semantics should be restricted to the examination of the informational features of I-language items. Externalists reject this restriction by saying that without employing the relational notion of (...)
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  19.  18
    Architecture and Sites: A Lesson From the Categorization of Artworks.Elisa Caldarola - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):5-24.
    Several contemporary architects have designed architectural objects that are closely linked to their particular sites. An in-depth study of the relevant relationship holding between those objects and their sites is, however, missing. This paper addresses the issue, arguing that those architectural objects are akin to works of site-specific art. In section (1), I introduce the topic of the paper. In section (2), I critically analyse the debate on the categorisation of artworks as site-specific. In section (3), I apply to architecture (...)
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  20.  36
    Doing Things with Words: The Transformative Force of Poetry.Philip Mills - 2021 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):111-133.
    Against the apparent casting away of poetry from contemporary philosophy of language and aesthetics which has left poetry forceless, I argue that poetry has a linguistic, philosophical, and even political force. Against the idea that literature (as novel) can teach us facts about the world, I argue that the force of literature (as poetry) resides in its capacity to change our ways of seeing. First, I contest views which consider poetry forceless by discussing Austin’s and Sartre’s views. Second, I explore (...)
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