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  1.  18
    Objectivity.Dagfinn Føllesdal - 2020 - Comparative Philosophy 11 (1).
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  2.  18
    On What is Real in Nāgārjuna’s “Middle Way”.Richard H. Jones - 2020 - Comparative Philosophy 11 (1).
    It has become popular to portray the Buddhist Nāgārjuna as an ontological nihilist, i.e., that he denies the reality of entities and does not postulate any further reality. A reading of his works does show that he rejects the self-existent reality of entities, but it also shows that he accepts a "that-ness" to phenomenal reality that survives the denial of any distinct, self-contained entities. Thus, he is not a nihilist concerning what is real in the final analysis of things. How (...)
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  3.  2
    Book Review on Free Will, Agency and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. [REVIEW]Prabal K. Sen - 2020 - Comparative Philosophy 11 (1).
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  4.  13
    A New Materialism: A Reading of the New Art From China.Mary Wiseman - 2020 - Comparative Philosophy 11 (1).
    This essay has three parts. The first moves from what artists confronted when China was first opened to the west in 1978 to what two classical Chinese critics and artists said art was and how it was to be made. The second looks at artists’ works made between two exhibitions in the United States, one in 1998, the other in 2017, to find an uncanny reprise of the classical principles. The third looks at the ideas of the global, contemporary, and (...)
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  5.  1
    The “Indirect Message” in Kierkegaard and Chán Buddhism.Zdeněk Zacpal - 2020 - Comparative Philosophy 11 (1).
    The article seeks to analyse Kierkegaard’s indirecte Meddelelse, which the author proposes to translate as ‘indirect message’. It attempts to consider and illuminate this concept and its general characteristics, types and cases in Kierkegaard's work. They are to serve as a baseline for investigations of indirect messages in Buddhism, especially the famous ‘public cases’ of the Chán Buddhists. The author tries to specify indirect messages on both sides of the cultural divide in terms of some Western philosophers. Kierkegaard’s theoretical rationale (...)
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