Ethics and Education

ISSN: 1744-9642

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  1. By way of infancy, an exercise in translation.Morgan Deumier - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (4):437-449.
    ABSTRACT This paper invites us to reconsider our usual understanding of infancy, no longer as something that passes but as infantia. The Latin word infantia, which is not easy to translate, means a lack of speech, a lack of eloquence, and also infancy, babyhood, and dumbness. Drawing on Barbara Cassin’s works on the untranslatables, I propose to translate infantia, starting by not-understanding, and then by taking detours by different texts, in-between languages. Exercising translation allows us to expose ourselves to the (...)
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  2. Herbart with Rancière on the Educational Significance of the ‘Third Thing’ in Teaching.Erik Hjulström & Johannes Rytzler - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (4):421-436.
    This article highlights the educational and the aesthetic significance of the subject matter (i.e., “the third thing”) in the relationship between teacher and pupil. This, through a reading of two texts, one written by the 19th century educationist and German philosopher Johann Friedrich Herbart, and one written by the contemporary philosopher and political theorist Jacques Rancière. By emphasizing the third thing between pupil and teacher, the article intends to reimagine both the educative and aesthetic values of those timeless things around (...)
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  3.  1
    Knowledge, Truth, and Education in Post-Normal Times.Kai Horsthemke - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (4):373-387.
    ABSTRACT The advent of Covid-19, a new and highly contagious form of Corona virus, in late 2019 cast a harsh light on human vulnerabilities and on the provocations (and opportunities) facing humanity. Although many of the more drastic measures applied within educational settings have since ceased to apply, at least for the time being, we are not yet ‘past Covid’: many of the challenges that are discussed here still exist. As we faced unprecedented disruption to economies, societies and education systems, (...)
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  4.  3
    Epistemic Injustice, Social Studies, and Moral Sensitivity.Samet Merzifonluoglu & Ercenk Hamarat - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (4):403-420.
    ABSTRACT There is growing interest in epistemic injustice and its connection to education. However, the relation between social studies and epistemic injustice has not yet been adequately explored and this topic has been given insufficient attention by social studies educators. But it is regarded as an important resource for students who are socially disadvantaged to render their experiences intelligible. However, due to its unique status, it has also been an effective tool for those who are in power and want to (...)
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  5.  3
    Epistemic Injustice, Social Studies, and Moral Sensitivity.Samet Merzifonluoglu & Ercenk Hamarat - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (4):403-420.
    ABSTRACT There is growing interest in epistemic injustice and its connection to education. However, the relation between social studies and epistemic injustice has not yet been adequately explored and this topic has been given insufficient attention by social studies educators. But it is regarded as an important resource for students who are socially disadvantaged to render their experiences intelligible. However, due to its unique status, it has also been an effective tool for those who are in power and want to (...)
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  6. Theorizing aesthetic injustice in democratic education: insights from Boal and Rancière.Michalinos Zembylas - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (4):388-402.
    This article examines some aspects of the entanglement between aesthetic injustice and epistemic injustice, paying special attention to how aesthetic injustice can be resisted in the classroom. The article brings into conversation Boal’s notion of aesthetic injustice with Rancière’s work on the overlapping of aesthetics and politics to suggest that a truly democratic education must work on the level of senses, so that students learn how to identify and resist aesthetic injustice in their everyday lives. Specifically, it is argued that (...)
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  7.  5
    Collective identities beyond homogenisation: implications for justice and education.Kalli Drousioti - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (3):294-310.
    In this article, I highlight what Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe’s (re)conceptualisation of the plurality within identities implies for justice and education. Laclau and Mouffe (re)theorise the plurality of identities by framing and understanding identities within the wider theoretical context of discourse analysis and radical Democracy. I argue that the significance of this specific (re)theorisation of the plurality within identities for justice and education has not yet been tackled by the related educational-philosophical scholarship, not even by that which focuses on (...)
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  8.  12
    Cultivating virtue through poetry: an exploration of the characterological features of poetry teaching.Kristian Guttesen & Kristján Kristjánsson - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (3):277-293.
    This paper explores the possibilities of using character education through poetry to cultivate virtue in a secondary-school context. It focuses on the philosophical assumptions behind the intervention development and some implications of the intervention. We explore character education and poetry teaching as a tool for moral reasoning through the means of the method of ‘poetic inquiry,’ drawing also on insights from Wittgenstein. Character education and ‘poetic inquiry’ share similar goals, but are not harmonious as far as theory and methodology goes. (...)
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  9.  8
    Educating for Collaboration: A Virtue Education Approach.Alkis Kotsonis - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (3):311-323.
    Given the instrumental value of good collaborations for societal flourishing, educating for good collaborators (viz., agents who have the motivation and ability to collaborate with others) should be one of the fundamental goals of contemporary education. Still, fostering the growth of dispositions needed for successful collaborations is not explicitly considered to be a first-rate pedagogical goal in most contemporary virtue education programs. To remedy this omission, I propose a virtue-based method for developing good collaborators through an education that involves a (...)
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  10.  3
    Remembering and Antifascist Education: A Response to My Critics.Tyson E. Lewis - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (3):368-371.
    This article is a short response to two reviews of the book Walter Benjamin’s Antifascist Education: From Riddles to Radio by Tyson E. Lewis. It discusses the role of aesthetics and memory in cultivating antifascist potentialities in children.
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  11.  3
    Learning how to decide: a theory on moral development inspired by the ethics of Leonardo Polo.Javier Pérez Guerrero - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (3):324-343.
    This study sets out the main points in Leonardo Polo’s theory of moral development, which systematically articulates goods, norms, and virtues. To make them easier to understand, each point has been compared with Kohlberg’s theory of moral development, which is well known to specialists and radically different to it. We have chosen three aspects of Kohlberg’s theory of moral development to highlight the uniqueness of Polo’s theory: a) Kohlberg does not account for the specificity of voluntary acts, particularly the act (...)
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  12.  2
    Violence and instrumentalism. On the margins of Tyson Lewis’s Walter Benjamin’s Antifascist Education.Paulina Sosnowska - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (3):348-358.
    My response to Tyson Lewis’s book concentrates on two themes, seemingly peripheral to the book’s explicit content: the pertinent question of (educational) violence and the related problem of instrumentalism. I try to tackle both of them by outlining the dispute between Walter Benjamin and Carl Schmitt. The choice of Schmitt as the background for these peripheral commentaries is not accidental. The premise of Lewis’s book is that there is a link between fascism and 21st century populism and authoritarianism (in the (...)
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  13.  3
    Walter Benjamin and the idea of antifascist education: introduction to a symposium.Joris Vlieghe & Piotr Zamojski - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (3):344-347.
    In this introduction we give a short account of the general idea of the symposium dedicated to the idea of antifascist education. The point of departure of all three contributions is Tyson Lewis’ book ‘Walter Benjamin’s Antifascist Education: From Riddles to Radio (SUNY 2020). We turn attention to the way the idea of antifascist education is understood throughout Lewis’ book, as it avoids the danger of treating fascism as a touchstone for education through giving the account of the ways education (...)
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  14.  2
    The art of straying as aesthetic education.Piotr Zamojski & Itay Snir - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (3):359-367.
    ABSTRACT Our discussion addresses Benjamin’s antifascist education through the lens of aesthetic education and Herbert Marcuse’s aesthetic theory. While this theme is not explicitly discussed in Lewis’ book, we argue that it is essential for understanding the full political and educational potential of what he calls “the art of straying in the city”. Such straying is aesthetic in a twofold way: it allows for the city to be experienced as a massive work of art, and at the same time it (...)
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  15.  6
    Ethics, politics and affects: renewing the conceptual and pedagogical framework of addressing fanaticism in education.Michalinos Zembylas - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (3):261-276.
    This essay reconceptualizes fanaticism as an activity that does not rely on the condemnation of ‘fanatical’ acts as a priori ‘irrational.’ Rather, it theorizes fanaticism as a method of ethical and political critique against a regime of representation. It also argues that it is crucial to understand fanaticism through an approach that does not set up a dichotomy between affect and reason, disavowing the ‘irrational’ behavior of fanatics. Drawing on affect theory and particularly the entanglement of feeling-thinking, this paper emphasizes (...)
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  16.  5
    The will to injustice. An autoethnography of learning to hear uncomfortable truths.Eevi E. Beck - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (2):211-229.
    ABSTRACT Activists and writers on injustice have highlighted as a structural problem that injustice is experienced differentially. What injustices of privilege lie hidden in my daily academic life? Three deeply discomforting moments relating to Class, climate, and Whiteness privilege, form the core of an account of gradually admitting to my passive acceptance of injustice in the form of privileges from which I benefit. My ignorance has perpetuated privilege despite this not being my conscious will. From this crisis, the paper explores (...)
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  17.  4
    An ethics of rhythm—reflections on justice and education.Inga Bostad - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (2):149-162.
    ABSTRACT I here explore how an ethics of rhythm can shed light on what promotes and inhibits recognition between people across our vulnerable lives, and the need for a renewal of the philosophy of pedagogy. I argue that philosophy itself has contributed to a certain oblivion regarding how we follow and create rhythmic societies, the need for a more profound and fine-tuned listening attitude as a philosophical-ethical marker, using among others Barthes concept of rhuthmos, Kierkegaards concept of repetition, Herbart’s concept (...)
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  18.  2
    ‘Plastic justice’: a metaphor for education.Kjetil Horn Hogstad - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (2):230-239.
    ABSTRACT Education appears to bear responsibility on the one hand to do justice to society’s need for reproduction and continuation, and on the other to do justice to the individual’s capacity for and need to express resistance, critique and political action. How we navigate this problem is tied to how we understand justice. ‘Plastic justice’ is the suggestion that questions concerning justice and education might find a materialist expression instead of the usual transcendental ideals of justice. In this perspective, ‘justice’ (...)
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  19.  2
    Facets of justice in education: a petroleum nation addressing United Nations sustainable development agenda.Ole Andreas Kvamme - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (2):163-182.
    ABSTRACT Norway has a complex, even paradoxical, relationship to the United Nations Agenda 2030 and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals. It makes considerable financial contributions to the United Nations and has strongly supported the establishment of the sustainability agenda aimed at promoting global equity and mitigating the ecological and climate crises. Norway is also a prominent petroleum-producing nation. The Norwegian position is explored using an approach that emphasizes justice and education in the sustainability agenda. Three key texts are studied. The (...)
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  20.  2
    When unhappiness is not the endpoint, fostering justice through education.Elin Rodahl Lie - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (2):183-196.
    ABSTRACT With a specific example from Norway and inspiration from Sara Ahmed’s The Promise of Happiness, this article demonstrates how today’s educational rhetoric lacks the language and will to recognise a key pedagogical dimension in education: what happens when the normative ambitions of education and students meet. At best, teaching students life skills to mitigate their mental health issues is naive. Inspired by Ahmed, such an initiative might actually work against its purpose. At a time when educational outcomes are emphasised (...)
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  21.  3
    Responding to wrong doing.Helgard Mahrdt - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (2):197-210.
    ABSTRACT I argue that educators, by introducing young people to various ways of responding to wrongdoing, help prepare them for the task of acting in and taking responsibility for the world. I begin by introducing Hannah Arendt’s understanding of the world, the characteristics of action as unpredictable, boundless and irreversible, i.e. the frailty of human affairs. I then move to what Arendt calls the ‘power of forgiveness.’ Forgiving is an action, and as such is free and unpredictable. Moreover, forgiving concerns (...)
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  22.  2
    Justice as rhythm, rhythms of injustice: reorienting the discourse on educational justice. A response.Claudia Schumann - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (2):254-259.
    ABSTRACT The academic discussion concerning justice in education tends to center around questions of equal educational opportunity and the distribution of educational resources. This paper responds to a special issue which collects different approaches to educational justice that move beyond the boundaries set by traditional, hegemonic perspectives in the field. I point to some important strands in which the different papers converge and outline how they attempt to produce a shift in the understanding of educational justice; how they bring into (...)
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  23.  4
    Educative justice in viral modernity. A Badiouan reading.Torill Strand - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (2):240-253.
    ABSTRACT The metaphor of ‘viral modernity’ denotes an era characterized by communal experiences of how viruses, be they in the shape of physical, virtual or symbolic forms, permeate and shape social and cultural life. To think educative justice in viral modernity thus require a radical move beyond the surfaces of conventional paradigms in order to reach at a deep-seated understanding of the phenomena of education and justice itself. Motivated by this ambition, I here present a Badiouan reading of educative justice (...)
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  24.  6
    What promotes justice in, for and through education today?Torill Strand - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (2):141-148.
  25.  3
    Teacher regulation and agency through the lens of Durkheim’s professional ethics.Louise Campbell - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (1):30-43.
    ABSTRACT In discussions of the regulation of teaching, there are a number of issues which arise concerning how teachers understand the professional expectations upon them and the role that such standards play in supporting and maintaining the ethical dimensions of teachers’ practice. Arguably, teachers’ professional standards evolve to meet the needs of the societies in which they exist. Consequently, they provide a locus for analysis of the desires, aspirations and philosophical perspectives of the social and educational systems to which they (...)
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  26.  6
    COVID-19 and young people in Spain. The emergence of values education as a strategy for civic responsibility.Alexis Cloquell-Lozano, Remedios Aguilar-Moya, Carlos Novella-García & Juan Antonio Giménez-Beut - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (1):77-100.
    ABSTRACT The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic has provoked a series of consequences all over the world, especially in young people. On the other hand, this sector of the population has shown an evident and baffling increased failure to comply with public health measures put in place, which has had a knock-on effect on the number of infections detected. These attitudes have resulted in repeated calls by bodies such as the World Health Organisation to remember the risks of this kind (...)
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  27.  69
    Satan as teacher: the view from nowhere vs. the moral sense.Johan Dahlbeck - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (1):14-29.
    To what extent should teachers promote the view from nowhere as an ideal to strive for in education? To address this question, I will use Mark Twain’s The Mysterious Stranger as an example, illustrating the stakes involved when the view from nowhere is taken to be an attainable educational ideal. I will begin this essay by offering a description of Thomas Nagel’s view from nowhere. Having done this, I will return to Twain’s story, providing some further examples of how access (...)
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  28.  3
    Professing the vulnerabilities of academic citizenship.Nuraan Davids - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (1):1-13.
    ABSTRACT As academics, we do not only produce and reproduce knowledge; we also produce our citizenship as a social and agonistic space. There are nuances embedded within academic citizenship – unqualifiable, but compelling in their production and reproduction of power dynamics, bringing into disrepute notions of academic citizenship as a homogenous or inclusive space. There are ways of being and becoming within citizenship that might be less readily conceivable, and hence, slip beneath the radar of scholarly scrutiny and debates.We have (...)
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  29.  1
    To beat or not to beat? On music, violence, and education.Wiebe Koopal - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (1):117-139.
    ABSTRACT In this article I venture the hypothesis that music confronts education with the possibility to think violence in ways that are both inherently educational and radically affirmative. Beginning with a reflection on a poem by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, which emphatically evokes the violence within the genesis of music, I then move in a different direction in the second section, which surveys how extant educational has thematized violence so far. Concluding that this thematization, notwithstanding many nuances, invariably implies a negative (...)
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  30.  2
    Taking the moral authorship of children and youth seriously in times of the Anthropocene.Christina Osbeck, Heila Lotz-Sisitka & Karin Sporre - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (1):101-116.
    ABSTRACT In this article we argue for the need to take the moral voices of children and youth seriously particularly in times of the Anthropocene. Drawing on theories in ethics by John Wall, moral development according to Mark B. Tappan, and education in line with the works by Vygotsky, we construct a conceptual framework where the notions ‘narrative,’ ‘moral authorship’ and ‘free will’ can open new creative understandings of human ethical competence; a competence based in a relational, contextual and societal-cultural (...)
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  31.  6
    Rethinking education to counter violent extremism: a critical review of policy and practice.Fatima Waqi Sajjad - 2022 - Ethics and Education 17 (1):59-76.
    ABSTRACT This paper explores the alarming phenomenon of violent extremism in university campuses. It probes why education fails to prevent violent extremism in this case? Drawing on Robert Cox’s distinction of problem solving and critical theories, the paper examines policy discourses that aim to prevent violent extremism through education. It is observed that dominant policy discourses take up problem solving approaches to prevent/counter violent extremism and fail to take into account the broader structural violence that feeds extremist ideologies. The counter (...)
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