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  1. Literary Study as an Education in Moral Perception and Imagination.Ross Collin - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (4):478-491.
    ABSTRACT This article explores how literary study engages readers’ moral perception and imagination. Although some philosophers discuss reading as a largely solitary activity, this article explores social practices of reading common in English language arts classrooms in secondary schools. The article shows how reading with others can change the quality of moral perception and imagination in literary study. Reading with others, the article contends, can involve an ethic focused on the good of knowing one’s ways of seeing make a difference (...)
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  2.  3
    Should Schools Be in Loco Parentis? Cautionary Thoughts.Joan F. Goodman - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (4):407-423.
    ABSTRACT The jurisdiction of schools has long been contested. Initially, under the sway of loco parentis, parents delegated all authority to educators. With ascendency of the common school movement in the 19th century, however, the doctrine confronted reverses. As the student body increased in size and heterogeneity, families no longer spoke with a single voice. The courts granted parental requests for a more determinative role in their children’s education, prohibited schools from giving religious instruction, and guaranteed students some civil rights. (...)
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  3.  2
    On the Platonic Pedagogical Methodology: An Alternative to the Aristotelian Theory of Education.Alkis Kotsonis - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (4):464-477.
    ABSTRACT My aim in this paper is to challenge the neo-Aristotelian tradition, currently dominant in contemporary theories of virtue education, by proposing the Platonic pedagogical methodology for virtue cultivation as a worthy alternative to the Aristotelian theory of education. I highlight that, in contrast to Aristotle’s limited remarks concerning virtue education, Plato conceptualizes and develops a rigorous educational theory in the Republic that considers many different facets of education – i.e. moral character education, intellectual character education, exemplarism and educational corruption. (...)
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  4.  3
    ‘Wicked Problems’ as Catalysts for Learning in Educational Ethics Games.Aline Nardo & Matthew Gaydos - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (4):492-509.
    ABSTRACT In this paper we discuss the potential of digital games to create meaningful educational experiences that contribute to the learning of ethics in higher education Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics degrees. We describe the design of a new digital ethics game with a focus on the challenges we encountered when applying existing theoretical frameworks for educational games and propose ways to address these challenges. We contend that existing design frameworks fail to account for the ‘wickedness’ of ethical problems – (...)
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  5. Learning in the City and Responding Reactively.Marianna Papastephanou - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (4):440-463.
    ABSTRACT The politics of lifelong learning and learnification have triggered educational philosophy’s justified indignation and blanket critiques of learning. The market logic of learning has, meanwhile, seized the city and caused a further educational-philosophical reactive response, which I critique in the form that it has taken inter alia in many prominent recent educational-philosophical works. After explaining what I mean by ‘reactive response’ I focus on the educational-philosophical reaction to the shift toward lifelong learning. Then I move to how this shift (...)
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  6. Encouraging Moral Outrage in Education: A Pedagogical Goal for Social Justice or Not?Michalinos Zembylas - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (4):424-439.
    ABSTRACT Should educators encourage students to learn moral outrage in teaching about social justice? If moral outrage is a catalyst for social change, to what extent can educators nurture this moral and political emotion in the classroom? These questions are at the heart of this essay. The aim is not to take sides for or against using moral outrage in education to motivate students towards change for the better, but rather to engage in an analysis and sorting through of various (...)
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  7.  5
    This Child: Descriptive Review in Support of Parental Ethics.Cara Furman - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (3):321-335.
    ABSTRACT In response to the abundance of parenting literature and a contemporary emphasis on expertise, recent scholars have suggested that how we parent should be determined by values and a family’s particular needs, a combination often referred to as practical wisdom. In this article, I build on previous calls for an ethical approach to being a parent. I argue that being able to share and cultivate one’s unique personality and have one’s aptitudes and interests recognized is a key condition of (...)
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  8.  5
    A Defence of Parental Compromise Concerning Veganism.Marcus William Hunt - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (3):392-405.
    ABSTRACT Co-parents who differ in their ideal child rearing policies should compromise, argues Marcus William Hunt. Josh Milburn and Carlo Alvaro dispute this when it comes to veganism. Milburn argues that veganism is a matter of justice and that to compromise over justice is impermissible. I suggest that compromise over justice is often permissible, and that compromise over justice may be required by justice itself. Alvaro offers aesthetic, gustatory, and virtue-based arguments for ethical veganism, showing that veganism involves sensibilities and (...)
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  9.  2
    ‘I See It as a Privilege to Get to Know Them’. Moral Dimensions in Teachers’ Work with Unaccompanied Refugee Students in Swedish Upper Secondary School.Ulrika Jepson Wigg - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (3):307-320.
    ABSTRACT The aim of this article is to analyze the moral dimensions of teachers’ experiences of working with unaccompanied refugee students in language introduction in Swedish upper secondary school. Theoretically, the analysis uses Bauman’s postmodern ethics, focusing on the tension between the social and the moral space in teachers’ encounters with unaccompanied students. The empirical material is derived from interviews with three teachers, and a reflexive interview approach was used. The outcome of the analysis shows that balancing professional and moral (...)
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  10.  12
    Zero-Compromise Veganism.Josh Milburn - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (3):375-391.
    ABSTRACT What is to be done when parents disagree about whether to raise their children as vegans? Three positions have recently emerged. Marcus William Hunt has argued that parents should seek a compromise. I have argued that there should be no compromise on animal rights, but there may be room for compromise over some ‘unusual’ sources of non-vegan, but animal-rights-respecting, food. Carlo Alvaro has argued that both Hunt and I are wrong; veganism is like religion, and there should be no (...)
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  11.  18
    The Pervasiveness of the Rational-Conceptual: An Educational-Philosophical Perspective on Nature, World and ‘Sustainable Development’.Koichiro Misawa - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (3):289-306.
    ABSTRACT At the heart of our current environmental predicament lies the issue of our relationship with nature. Michael Bonnett’s educational rehabilitation of nature, which might be called a ‘metaphysical’ turn in nature-related issues, brings us back to the core question of educational-philosophical thinking: how we are to understand ourselves and our relation to the world. In this paper, by confronting his environmental philosophy of education with what John McDowell, in his debate with Hubert Dreyfus, terms the ‘pervasiveness thesis’ – that (...)
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  12.  4
    Inflorescent Dignity: A Reconstructive Interpretation of Martha Nussbaum’s Conception of Dignity and its Implications for Education.Lia Mollvik - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (3):336-354.
    ABSTRACT The concept of human dignity arguably has great relevance to education as it is mentioned in several human rights and education policy documents on the national and international level, providing their moral justification. However, when the concept is discussed within philosophical research, it is often seen as consisting of two different conceptions – intrinsic dignity and attributed dignity. The paper seeks to challenge this binary through a reconstructive interpretation of Martha Nussbaum’s conception of dignity, proposing inflorescent dignity, as a (...)
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  13.  3
    Hospitality, Asylum and Education: Around Emmanuel Levinas’s Talmudic Readings.Rafał Włodarczyk - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (3):355-374.
    ABSTRACT In reference to the article by Hanan Alexander ‘Education in nonviolence’, the text takes up the issue of reading Emmanuel Levinas’s Talmudic texts for the philosophy of education. It intends to positively answer the question about the value and potential of such inspiration, focusing on concepts from two of Levinas’s Talmudic readings. The first part of the text is devoted to the characteristics of the intellectual output of the thinker. The second part analyses and discusses Alexander’s commentary on one (...)
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  14.  13
    The Task of Education as We Confront the Potential for Social and Ecological Collapse.Vanessa De Oliveira Andreotti - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):143-158.
    ABSTRACT This article invites us to consider the task of education as we face the end of the world as we have known it. The first part of the article gives an overview of global and educational challenges, drawing attention to how formal education has been complicit in the reproduction of historical and systemic violence, as well as unsustainability. This section also offers a distinction between educational approaches that focus on personal empowerment and the mastery of knowledge and skills, and (...)
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  15.  7
    Co-Creation in the Commonwealth: Understanding Right Relationship in Place.Mark Beatham - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):236-248.
    ABSTRACT Could public education as a cultural institution promote the commonwealth? This paper argues proper education enfranchises the young through proper relationships to place, past and present, culture and creation, life, and work. Wendell Berry is the principal guide and standard in describing and considering proper relationships in the commonwealth and their consequences. Other major authors include Wes Jackson, Gustavo Esteva, Vine Deloria, Alan Watts, Matthew Crawford, Roger Scruton, Nablan and Trimble, Alison Gopnik. Proper relationships, defined essentially in terms of (...)
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  16.  7
    Psychoanalytic Ecofeminist Dorothy Dinnerstein: Theorizing the Roots of Rapacity.Gregory Bynum - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):209-221.
    ABSTRACT This article proposes that Dorothy Dinnerstein’s philosophy can help us understand the problem of miseducation that places male-dominated and ‘masculine’ rapacity at the center of so many human endeavors, including capitalist economic exploitation and environmental exploitation. Dinnerstein argues that early childhood experiences of female domination lead to reactive and immature adult preferences for excessive, triumphing, rapacious, male rule. In Dinnerstein’s theory, the solution to this psychologically deep-rooted problem is for men to do half of the childcare work. This article (...)
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  17.  10
    Be the Village: Exploring the Ethics of Having Children.David Chang - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):182-195.
    ABSTRACT The rapid increase in human population is one of the underlying factors driving the ecological crisis. Despite efforts on the part of educators to raise awareness of environmental issues, the ecological impact of a burgeoning population – and the ethical implications of having children – remains an unbroachable topic. Nevertheless, the increase in human numbers is central to questions of sustainability: How can a species expect to survive in a finite terrestrial environment without limits to its population? Since most (...)
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  18.  6
    Got Milk? From Growing Strong Bones to Nurturing Idealized Subjectivities.Samantha Deane & Annie Schultz - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):196-208.
    ABSTRACT Philosophers of education have written about the moral, ethical, racial, and gendered dimensions of the hidden curriculum of what we eat, who we eat with, and the significance afforded this moment of the school day. To this body of literature, we add the observation that female bodies were positioned by Jean Jacques Rousseau as necessary food for the stuff of society. We trace the ways in which Rousseau’s rendering of the natural female body have followed us into our modern (...)
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  19.  5
    Educating in and for Uncertainty. Climate Science, Human Evolution and the Legacy of Arne Naess as Guidance for Ecological Practice.Margarita García-Notario - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):222-235.
    ABSTRACT This paper reflects on how the issue of climate change and the general state of our planet is, among other causes, a main factor in the paralyzing divisions ailing Western societies. This situation, while unsettling to democracies, is promoting a kind of education in and through fear and I question if education can succeed under these circumstances without becoming indoctrination. This paper does not try to diminish the urgency and the importance of current environmental problems but rather expands today´s (...)
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  20.  5
    Spiritual Exercises in Times of Climate Change.Daniel P. Gibboney - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):276-287.
    ABSTRACT ‘Facts remain robust only when … supported by a common culture,’ observes Bruno Latour. Current debates over the veracity of climate change are, in actuality, crises of facts. Questions of facticity have, moreover, precipitated a deeper issue – the prospects of unshared, ‘alternative’ worlds. Climate science believers have one world, climate change deniers another, creating what Latour calls ‘epistemological delirium.’ Following Latour, the paper turns to Pierre Hadot’s description of Stoic physics and understanding of philosophy as spiritual exercise. Finally, (...)
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  21.  6
    White, Green Futures.Cortland Gilliam - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):262-275.
    ABSTRACT Black, Indigenous and otherwise minoritized communities of color are amongst the most vulnerable to the adverse consequences of environmental crises and the solutions proposed to remedy them. The participation and subsequent erasure of non-White youth activists and organizers within environmental sustainability struggles, and their subsequent erasure in global media coverage on climate activism has complicated any neat hierarchy of single concerns facing humanity. How is it that White and Western climate activists come to be the faces of the global (...)
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  22.  7
    Animal Advocacy, Fear and Loathing in Academia: A Response to Helena Pedersen.Kai Horsthemke - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):178-181.
    ABSTRACT Helena Pedersen’s powerful keynote address poses the question: What prevents education from becoming a transformative force in times of ‘omnicide’, that is, ‘the annihilation of everything’? She locates at least part of the response in ‘institutional anxiety’, which constitutes a psychological barrier to radical change. In particular, she discusses anxiety related to the moral standing of non-human animals as a threat to human exceptionalism in educational practice and research. Institutional anxiety, as I show in my discussion of a recent (...)
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  23.  5
    Introduction: Education, the Environment and Sustainability.Kai Horsthemke - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):137-142.
    ABSTRACT The 17th Biennial INPE Meeting was scheduled to take place from 28 to 31 July 2020 at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Of course, there is something ironic about convening a conference on the environment and sustainability that would require presenters to utilize unsustainable modes of transport in order to participate. As it turned out, because of the outbreak and rapid global spread of a new Corona virus, the conference was cancelled and replaced by an online event held (...)
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  24.  4
    Education, Anthropocentrism, and Interspecies Sustainability: Confronting Institutional Anxieties in Omnicidal Times.Helena Pedersen - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):164-177.
    ABSTRACT Deborah Britzman’s remarkable question, ‘What holds education back?’, appears more urgent than ever in a world of accelerating environmental crises, climate change, and what has been described as omnicide – the annihilation of everything. What, then, holds education back from initiating radical change under these urgent conditions? This paper introduces the notion of ‘institutional anxiety’ as a consolidating force and explores how it may condition possibilities for resistance. Bringing examples from ethnographic fieldwork and experiences of course development in conversation (...)
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  25.  7
    Youth Power—Youth Movements: Myth, Activism, and Democracy.Lynda Stone - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):249-261.
    ABSTRACT This article explores relationships of youth power in a set of threads leading to the potential of today’s youth activism to combat the climate crisis. Following an introduction featuring Sweden’s Greta Thunberg, the threads are these: First from an American context is history of youth development, with one emphasis on the construction of adolescence. Second is learning experience about the US environment with its own national ‘exceptionalist’ history. Third is the role of inspiring youth movements, from history and contemporary (...)
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  26.  4
    ‘Landing on Earth:’ an Educational Project for the Present. A Response to Vanessa Andreotti.Sharon Todd - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (2):159-163.
    ABSTRACT This paper responds to Vanessa Andreotti’s keynote address. In it, I draw out some educational implications of facing the everyday denials of the climate emergency. In particular, I mobilise Bruno Latour’s phrase ‘landing on Earth’ to indicate that the very terms through which we understand education, particularly as it relates to the future, require a profound shift.
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  27.  13
    Understanding Student Mental Health: Difficulty, Deflection and Darkness.Emma Farrell & Áine Mahon - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (1):36-50.
    ABSTRACT With a particular focus on the experience of young people in higher education, this paper turns to the philosophical work of Cora Diamond to open up new ways of conceptualising mental health. We claim that Diamond offers a compelling insight into that experience of human difficulty so often subsumed by a medicalised vocabulary. We propose that she offers philosophically astute perceptions of the related human attempts at deflection. And we situate this reading of Diamond against a broader understanding of (...)
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  28.  7
    The Adventure of Responsive Teaching: Lessons From Cora and Julie Diamond.Jeff Frank - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (1):20-35.
    ABSTRACT This paper introduces the special section on Cora Diamond’s significance for education and educators. The introduction is meant to be the beginning of a conversation, and—to that end—the special section editors suggest lines of connections that philosophers of education might draw between their work and the work of Cora Diamond. Their list is not meant to be exhaustive, but it is meant to suggest Diamond’s far-reaching significance for education and educators.
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  29.  8
    Introduction: Exploring Cora Diamond’s Significances for Education and Educators.Jeff Frank & Megan Laverty - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (1):1-19.
    ABSTRACT This paper introduces the special section on Cora Diamond’s significance for education and educators. The introduction is meant to be the beginning of a conversation, and—to that end—the special section editors suggest lines of connections that philosophers of education might draw between their work and the work of Cora Diamond. Their list is not meant to be exhaustive, but it is meant to suggest Diamond’s far-reaching significance for education and educators.
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  30.  8
    Olmmái-Stállu: Deflection, Decolonization, and Silence in Sámi Early Childhood Scholarship.Viktor Johansson - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (1):51-73.
    This essay explores the existential difficulties involved in being a non-indigenous scholar of philosophy and early childhood education in an indigenous context. It begins by recalling an encounter with young Sámi children that happened while doing research at an early childhood centre in northern Scandinavia. This is read alongside the poetry of the Sámi writer Nils Aslak Valkeapää, a personal documentary text by Sámi author Elin Anna Labba, and Wittgensteinian philosophy. These texts are read as a philosophical exercise of the (...)
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  31.  7
    Teaching at the Margin - Didaktik in the Sphere of Attention.Johannes Rytzler - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (1):108-121.
    ABSTRACT Attentiveness is a crucial aspect in the practice of teaching. As teaching always is teaching about something, ideas, values, events, or objects, it both draws and forms the attention of the students. When contemplating on and looking into the term “attention”, it is apparent that it is not at all, a clear and well-defined concept. Acknowledging the relational aspects of teaching and its role in the formation of attention, the article seeks to turn away from psychologically, behaviorally, and cognitively (...)
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  32.  6
    The Undercurrents of Neoliberal Ethics in Science Curricula: A Critical Appraisal.Ajay Sharma & Elaine Margaret Alvey - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (1):122-136.
    ABSTRACT The world is confronted with wicked environmental problems that cannot be well understood or acted upon without addressing their ethical dimensions. Research shows that official science curricula on environmental science and ecology topics are shaped by the scientific discourse and environmental discourses of ecological modernization and green governmentality. These discourses carry tacit ethical stances that need to be acknowledged and assessed for their suitability in helping us understand and tackle wicked environmental problems. This paper explores the ethical alignments of (...)
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  33.  11
    Releasing Education Into the Wild: An Education in, and of, the Outdoors.Claire Skea & Amanda Fulford - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (1):74-90.
    ABSTRACT This paper considers the recent growth in different kinds of learning outside the classroom, especially Forest Schools. It shows how the activities associated with Forest Schools often involve mainstream curriculum content delivered in outdoor settings, with a focus on developing skills and attitudes that can be utilised when back in the classroom. Drawing on the works of Henry David Thoreau and Anna Shepherd, we suggest that there is an important distinction to be made between an education in the outdoors, (...)
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  34.  10
    ‘Equipping Students with an Ethical Compass.’ What Does It Mean, and What Does It Imply?Lieke H. Van Stekelenburg, Doret De Ruyter & Wouter Sanderse - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (1):91-107.
    ABSTRACT The expression that professionals should be led by their moral or ethical compass is increasingly used by academics, policy makers, professionals, and educational institutes. Dutch universities of applied sciences, for example, explicitly aim to educate their students to become professionals equipped with a moral compass. This moral or ethical compass is a metaphor of which people intuitively grasp its meaning, but our literature review also shows that various interpretations are possible. We found three clusters of proposed ethical compasses expressing (...)
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  35. A Defence of Parental Compromise Concerning Veganism.Marcus William Hunt - 2021 - Ethics and Education 1 (1):1-14.
    Co-parents who differ in their ideal child rearing policies should compromise, argues Marcus William Hunt. Josh Milburn and Carlo Alvaro dispute this when it comes to veganism. Milburn argues that veganism is a matter of justice and that to compromise over justice is (typically) impermissible. I suggest that compromise over justice is often permissible, and that compromise over justice may be required by justice itself. Alvaro offers aesthetic, gustatory, and virtue-based arguments for ethical veganism, showing that veganism involves sensibilities and (...)
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