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  1.  7
    Kenosis, Nature, and Anthropocentrism: A Response to Fulvi.Paolo Diego Bubbio - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):205-216.
    In this paper I address the issues raised by Daniele Fulvi, by focusing on the alleged anthropocentrism of my approach to kenotic thought. I defend ontological anthropocentrism (as opposed to ethical anthropocentrism), arguing that a qualified ontological anthropocentrism is not only inevitable, but also more appropriate in order to think of nature in the context of kenotic thought. Subsequently, I address the question of the relation between kenosis and truth, and the issue of how kenotic thought could, and should, relate (...)
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  2.  6
    Thinking What Is Strange and Dangerous: Heidegger, Tragedy, and Original Ethics.Robert Gall - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):266-280.
    This paper returns to one of Heidegger’s pivotal references to ethics – his remarks in the “Letter on Humanism” – and attempts to follow up on a line of thinking in those remarks that Heidegger himself did not expand upon, namely, the link between ethics and Sophoclean tragedy. Reading Heidegger’s analysis of Heraclitus’s Fragment 119 on ἤθος with reference to Sophoclean tragedy and in conjunction with Heidegger’s thinking and his comments elsewhere on ethics and tragedy, the paper seeks to clarify (...)
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  3.  10
    Zhuangzi and Simone Weil on Decreating the Self.Ryan Harte - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):281-294.
    This essay thinks through Nanguo Ziqi’s famous “I lost myself” (wu sang wo 吾喪我) remark in the Qiwulun 齊物論 in light of Weil’s notion of decreation. The desire to undo the self is paradoxical, and most philosophical interpretations of the Zhuangzi passage try to avoid the paradox of “I lost myself” by positing various levels of self. Weil’s decreation embraces the paradox, and thereby helps clarify how Nanguo’s “I lost myself” connects with his subsequent metaphor of pipes of Heaven. More (...)
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  4.  3
    Charlie’s Reading Room: Comparative Philosophy as Just Philosophy.David Jones - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):201-202.
    The lecture was to be held in the Charles A. Moore Reading Room where the famed author of Confucius: The Secular as Sacred, Herbert Fingarette, was scheduled to speak to faculty and students. I got...
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  5.  6
    Reform or Replace? The Category of Faith and Global Philosophy of Religion.Timothy D. Knepper - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):310-314.
    Among the chief challenges for a “global” philosophy of religion is not merely that of including a more diverse array of religio-philosophies, but also that of interrogating and recalibrating its foundational categories of inquiry. Asian Philosophies and the Idea of Religion responds to both challenges, the former with respect to a variety of non-western, Greco-Roman, and Western-wisdom religio-philosophies, the latter, by critiquing the category of faith.
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  6.  13
    The Fractal Self: Science, Philosophy, and the Evolution of Human Cooperation.Jennifer Liu - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):315-317.
    One of the most classic ontological problems of philosophy is the question of why there exists something instead of nothing. In John L. Culliney and David Jones’s The Fractal Self: Science, Philoso...
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  7.  3
    In This Issue 14.3.Jennifer Liu & Jason M. Wirth - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):203-204.
    Our final issue in the fourteenth volume is a treasure trove of thought, including two essays on Nāgārjuna, two essays on Heidegger, a major statement by the renowned Italian philosopher Paolo Dieg...
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  8.  6
    Becoming and Negation, Protagoras and Nāgārjuna.Robin Reames - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):217-235.
    This essay explores a curious point of intersection in the historical pairing of becoming and negation, between two thinkers and two traditions: the Sophist Protagoras of fifth-century BCE Greece and the second-century CE South Asian Buddhist thinker Nāgārjuna. I offer a speculative account of how becoming and negation are linked in Protagoras—speculative because only so much can be deduced from the extant fragments and testimony. I compare that account to the more coherent picture offered by Nāgārjuna—more coherent because a complete (...)
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  9.  7
    Tetralemma and Trinity: An Essay on Buddhist and Christian Ontologies.Rafal K. Stepien - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):236-254.
    This is an essay in comparative philosophy and philosophy of religion building on the ontological claims espoused by two major thinkers in the Buddhist and Christian philosophical traditions: Nāgārjuna (c. 150–250) and Hegel (1770–1831). I use Nāgārjuna’s fourfold tetralemma (catuṣkoṭi) and Hegel’s threefold dialectic (Dialektik) to propose a novel understanding of the ontological status of the self in its relation to itself and to its other, the no-self. Thus, I apply the tetralemma to the self, arguing that, to attain ontic (...)
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  10.  8
    Ereignis and the Grounding of Interpretation: Toward a Heideggerian Reading of Translation and Translatability as Appropriative Event.Ian Tan - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):255-265.
    In his lecture course on Hölderlin's hymn “The Ister,” Heidegger makes a striking claim about translation which implies that the paradigm of translation can never be encapsulated by a passive substitution of one linguistic signifier for another, for what is involved is no less than the stance the translator takes within his original language as unconcealment, and how he ex-sists toward the other language as the site of another revelation. If the human being and Being belong together by the happening (...)
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  11.  4
    Author Meets Readers: On Rein Raud’s Being in Flux.Jason M. Wirth, Jennifer Liu & Rein Raud - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (3):295-309.
    This is the first of an ongoing series of review essays in which the authors of significant new works of philosophy engage their readers. These inaugural two readings discuss Rein Raud’s important new reassessment of contemporary ontology, Being in Flux: A Post-Anthropocentric Ontology of the Self. They consider its accomplishments, both on its own terms and with reference to its East Asian and South Asian precursors. Raud then offers a response.
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  12.  10
    Ueda Shizuteru’s Zen Philosophy of Dialogue: The Free Exchange of Host and Guest.Bret W. Davis - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (2):162-177.
    This essay seeks to understand the nature of both interpersonal and intercultural dialogue from the perspective of Zen Buddhism as it has been interpreted, in dialogue with Western philosophy and religion, by the central figure of the third generation of the Kyoto School: Ueda Shizuteru (1926–2019). It examines how Ueda develops a philosophy of interpersonal dialogue on the basis of Zen teachings and practices. In particular, it reveals how Ueda draws on Huayan and Zen Buddhist notions of “host” and “guest” (...)
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  13.  7
    The Legacy of Ueda Shizuteru: A Zen Life of Dialogue in a Twofold World.Bret W. Davis - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (2):112-127.
    Ueda Shizuteru 上田閑照 (1926–2019) led a double life. And he taught us how we, too, can lead double lives. Or rather, he explained how we are already in fact doing so. It’s just that we don’t realize...
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  14.  3
    Editor’s Preface.David Jones - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (2):111-111.
    Over the fourteen years that we have been publishing Comparative and Continental Philosophy, we have shared five Special Issues with our readers. The first was published in our seventh year and was...
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  15.  6
    Ueda Shizuteru’s Philosophy of the Twofold.John W. M. Krummel - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (2):153-161.
    In this paper, I explicate Ueda Shizuteru’s philosophy of the twofold being-in-the-world and the ethics he draws from it. Ueda provides an original reading of Nishida’s concept of pure experience and develops it together with an understanding of Nishida’s concept of place by combining it with the phenomenological notion of the horizon. This leads him to understand the world, or place wherein we are, as twofold, implying the semantic space or network of meanings within it, on the one hand, and, (...)
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  16.  5
    Alternative Configurations of Alterity in Dialogue with Ueda Shizuteru.John C. Maraldo - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (2):178-195.
    Alterity, the difference that being-other makes, is not an overt theme in the writing of Ueda Shizuteru, and yet by bringing alterity to the fore we are able to connect and examine several themes that Ueda does engage explicitly. It will turn out that several models of alterity are discernable in Ueda’s philosophy, and their common ground opens a mode of being-other that offers an alternative to dominant models of irreducible difference. Ueda’s philosophy of language suggests four alternative configurations that (...)
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  17.  4
    Meister Eckhart’s Mysticism in Comparison with Zen Buddhism.Ueda Shizuteru Translated by Gregory S. Moss - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (2):128-152.
    ABSTRACT “Meister Eckhart’s Mysticism in Comparison with Zen Buddhism” originally appeared as the concluding section of Ueda Shizuteru’s first book, Die Gottesgeburt in der Seele und der Durchbruch zur Gottheit: Die mystische Anthropologie Meister Eckharts und ihre Konfrontation mit der Mystik des Zen-Buddhismus. It was first published in 1965 as an expanded version of Ueda’s doctoral dissertation, which was written under the supervision of Ernst Benz at the University of Marburg. Ueda’s careful analysis not only illuminates important points of affinity (...)
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  18.  4
    Ueda Shizuteru and the Between.Jason M. Wirth - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (2):196-199.
    These are short reflections on Ueda Shizuteru’s collection of essays, written in German, called Wer und was bin ich? Zur Phänomenologie des Selbst im Zen-Buddhismus. I read and respond to them as a way of paying my respects to this great thinker by locating the space of transformative philosophical encounter that his writing enacts and invites.
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  19.  12
    The “Beautiful Soul” and “Religious Consciousness”: Deleuze and Nishida.Russell J. Duvernoy - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (1):30-43.
    A well-known term in eighteenth-century literature and philosophy, the “beautiful soul” (die schöne Seele) has resurfaced in recent years. Deleuze refers to the beautiful soul’s “religiosity” and argues that aggressive “selection” is necessary as its antidote. However, in volatile contexts of social destabilization, such selection risks recoiling into reactionary violence. After first developing in more detail the beautiful soul’s background as a discursive figure, I argue that understanding Deleuze’s selection within a context of spiritual experience is necessary to mitigate this (...)
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  20.  4
    Kenosis and Nature: Critical Notes on Vattimo’s and Bubbio’s Notion of Kenotic Sacrifice.Daniele Fulvi - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (1):57-71.
    In this paper, I focus on Gianni Vattimo’s and Paolo Diego Bubbio’s notion of kenosis showing that (1) they both understand kenotic sacrifice in a strongly hermeneutical sense, and connect it with a perspectival account of truth and knowledge; (2) they both emphasize that kenotic sacrifice has a fundamentally ethical aspect; and (3) they both maintain that kenotic sacrifice is an “un-natural” act that is implied in the withdrawal of one’s self. However, I intend to show that nature can be (...)
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  21.  3
    Defacing Eternal Re-Coming.David Jones - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (1):1-5.
    The first time I encountered the Rock, I tried to imagine Nietzsche’s experience and what it must have felt like to come to the rock for the first time. He tells us, of course, of the thought that...
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  22.  6
    On Nothingness in the Heart of the Empire and the Wartime Politics of the Kyoto School. [REVIEW]John W. M. Krummel - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (1):99-109.
    In this review essay of Harumi Osaki’s book, Nothingness in the Heart of the Empire, about the Kyoto School’s wartime political philosophy, I examine the arguments and claims behind Osaki’s thesis that the Kyoto School tends to align itself with nationalist and imperialist formations that lead to political concerns. I focus on some of the concrete problems with her arguments, including the book’s lack of examination of the sociopolitical context behind and surrounding the philosophers’ wartime discourse. These problems result in (...)
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  23.  3
    In This Issue 14.1.Jennifer Luo-Liu & Jason M. Wirth - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (1):6-7.
    Our fourteenth year of publication begins with an exceptional expansion of our sense of philosophy’s powers and resources. In our special featured article, Brian Schroeder’s groundbreaking essay, “...
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  24.  21
    The Eye is in Things: On Deleuze and Speculative Realism.Pablo Pachilla - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (1):44-56.
    Speculative realists have directed a radical critique towards what they call “correlationism,” the stance according to which we only have access to the correlation between thinking and being, and never to either term considered apart from the other. Both Quentin Meillassoux and Ray Brassier have used Gilles Deleuze’s ontology as a paradigmatic example of correlationism. Instead of defending Deleuze from this accusation, I argue that we need to accept it, but that the correlation is drastically transformed when we take into (...)
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  25.  13
    The Way of Becoming-Imperceptible: Daoism, Deleuze, and Inner Transformation.Brian Schroeder - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (1):8-29.
    This essay brings together the discourses of Daoism and Deleuze and Guattari to elucidate the convergence among them on a fundamental metaphysical level that can open, for the receptive mind, a deeper intuitive insight and understanding of what a person is capable of doing and becoming, and how such a person can enter into a different relation with spacetime beyond the conventional understanding of it. After examining how vital energy (qi 氣) is transformed in internal alchemy (neidan 内丹), the focus (...)
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  26.  17
    Sylvia Wynter’s New Science of the Word and the Autopoetics of the Flesh.Rafael Vizcaíno - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (1):72-88.
    This essay proposes that the work of Sylvia Wynter, a canonical figure in Afro-Caribbean philosophy, demonstrates other ways of doing philosophy, a comparative philosophy carried out as a cross-cultural exercise. Sylvia Wynter has argued for a “New Science of the Word” by drawing from the contributions of Frantz Fanon (sociogeny), Aimé Césaire (poetic knowledge), and the field of cybernetics, among other sources. This essay aims to explain the framework and methodology of the New Science and the original transdisciplinary engagement that (...)
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  27.  2
    In This Issue 14.1.Jason M. Wirth & Jennifer Luo-Liu - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (1):6-7.
    Our fourteenth year of publication begins with an exceptional expansion of our sense of philosophy’s powers and resources. In our special featured article, Brian Schroeder’s groundbreaking essay, “...
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  28.  8
    The Poetics of Hope: Treanor’s Invitation to the Mystery of Being. [REVIEW]Christopher Yates - 2022 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 14 (1):89-98.
    A study of the strain and striving in the heart of human finitude, Brian Treanor’s case for melancholic joy uses the resources of hermeneutic philosophy and the arts to galvanize a hopeful counterweight to despair. Though evil and suffering are tragically ingrained in the tissue of lived experience, and entropy and loss buffet our projects and aspirations, there remains in the landscape of being a durable mystery of goodness, beauty, and grace. Treanor pits such mystery against our calcified pessimisms and (...)
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