Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy

ISSNs: 1386-7423, 1572-8633

22 found

View year:

  1.  10
    Discovering clinical phronesis.Donald Boudreau, Hubert Wykretowicz, Elizabeth Anne Kinsella, Abraham Fuks & Michael Saraga - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):165-179.
    Phronesis is often described as a ‘practical wisdom’ adapted to the matters of everyday human life. Phronesis enables one to judge what is at stake in a situation and what means are required to bring about a good outcome. In medicine, phronesis tends to be called upon to deal with ethical issues and to offer a critique of clinical practice as a straightforward instrumental application of scientific knowledge. There is, however, a paucity of empirical studies of phronesis, including in medicine. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  1
    Vision, body and interpretation in medical imaging diagnostics.Renzhen Chen & Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):253-266.
    This article explores the profound impact of visualism and visual perception in the context of medical imaging diagnostics. It emphasizes the intricate interplay among vision, embodiment, subjectivity, language, and historicity within the realm of medical science and technology, with a specific focus on image consciousness. The study delves into the role of subjectivity in perception, facilitating the communication of opacity and historicity to the perceiving individual. Additionally, it scrutinizes the image interpretation process, drawing parallels to text interpretation and highlighting the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  15
    Severity and death.Adam Ehlert - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):217-226.
    This article discusses the relationship between two theories about the badness of death, the Life-Comparative Account and the Gradualist Account, and two methods of operationalizing severity in health care priority setting, Absolute Shortfall and Proportional Shortfall. The aim is that theories about the badness of death can influence and inform the idea of the basis of severity as a priority setting criterion. I argue that there are strong similarities between the Life-Comparative Account and Absolute Shortfall, and since the Life-Comparative Account (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  3
    The impotence of ethics.Henk ten Have & Bert Gordijn - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):135-136.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  7
    A critical view on using “life not worth living” in the bioethics of assisted reproduction.Agnes Elisabeth Kandlbinder - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):189-203.
    This paper critically engages with how life not worth living (LNWL) and cognate concepts are used in the field of beginning-of-life bioethics as the basis of arguments for morally requiring the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and/or germline genome editing (GGE). It is argued that an objective conceptualization of LNWL is largely too unreliable in beginning-of-life cases for deriving decisive normative reasons that would constitute a moral duty on the part of intending parents. Subjective frameworks are found to be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  14
    Epistemic (in)justice, social identity and the Black Box problem in patient care.Muneerah Khan & Cornelius Ewuoso - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):227-240.
    This manuscript draws on the moral norms arising from the nuanced accounts of epistemic (in)justice and social identity in relational autonomy to normatively assess and articulate the ethical problems associated with using AI in patient care in light of the Black Box problem. The article also describes how black-boxed AI may be used within the healthcare system. The manuscript highlights what needs to happen to align AI with the moral norms it draws on. Deeper thinking – from other backgrounds other (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  12
    Living ethics: a stance and its implications in health ethics.Eric Racine, Sophie Ji, Valérie Badro, Aline Bogossian, Claude Julie Bourque, Marie-Ève Bouthillier, Vanessa Chenel, Clara Dallaire, Hubert Doucet, Caroline Favron-Godbout, Marie-Chantal Fortin, Isabelle Ganache, Anne-Sophie Guernon, Marjorie Montreuil, Catherine Olivier, Ariane Quintal, Abdou Simon Senghor, Michèle Stanton-Jean, Joé T. Martineau, Andréanne Talbot & Nathalie Tremblay - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):137-154.
    Moral or ethical questions are vital because they affect our daily lives: what is the best choice we can make, the best action to take in a given situation, and ultimately, the best way to live our lives? Health ethics has contributed to moving ethics toward a more experience-based and user-oriented theoretical and methodological stance but remains in our practice an incomplete lever for human development and flourishing. This context led us to envision and develop the stance of a “living (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  16
    Who has a meaningful life? A care ethics analysis of selective trait abortion.Riley Clare Valentine - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):205-216.
    Trait Selective Abortions (TSA) have come under critique as a medical practice that presents potential disabled infants as burdens and lacking the potential for meaningful lives. This paper, using the author’s background as a disabled person, contends that the philosophy underpinning TSAs reflects liberal society’s lack of a theory of needs. The author argues for a care ethics based approach informed by disability analyses to engage with TSAs.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  28
    Embodiment and regenerative implants: a proposal for entanglement.Manon van Daal, Anne-Floor J. de Kanter, Karin R. Jongsma, Annelien L. Bredenoord & Nienke de Graeff - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):241-252.
    Regenerative Medicine promises to develop treatments to regrow healthy tissues and cure the physical body. One of the emerging developments within this field is regenerative implants, such as jawbone or heart valve implants, that can be broken down by the body and are gradually replaced with living tissue. Yet challenges for embodiment are to be expected, given that the implants are designed to integrate deeply into the tissue of the living body, so that implant and body become one. In this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  1
    No (true) right to die: barriers in access to physician-assisted death in case of psychiatric disease, advanced dementia or multiple geriatric syndromes in the Netherlands.Caroline van den Ende & Eva Constance Alida Asscher - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):181-188.
    Even in the Netherlands, where the practice of physician-assisted death (PAD) has been legalized for over 20 years, there is no such thing as a ‘right to die’. Especially patients with extraordinary requests, such as a wish for PAD based on psychiatric suffering, advanced dementia, or (a limited number of) multiple geriatric syndromes, encounter barriers in access to PAD. In this paper, we discuss whether these barriers can be justified in the context of the Dutch situation where PAD is legally (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  10
    Fostering dialogue: a phenomenological approach to bridging the gap between the “voice of medicine” and the “voice of the lifeworld”.Junguo Zhang - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (2):155-164.
    This article adopts Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology to explore the complex relationship between patients and physicians. It delves into the coexistence of two distinct voices in the realm of medicine and health: the “voice of medicine” and the “voice of life-world.” Divided into three sections, the article emphasizes the importance of shifting from a scientific-medical attitude to a more personalistic approach in physician–patient interactions. This shift aims to prevent depersonalization and desubjectification. Additionally, it highlights the equal and irreducible nature of patients (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  16
    A reply to Gillham on the impairment principle.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):31-35.
    The impairment argument claims that abortion is immoral, because it results in a greater impairment to a fetus than other actions that are clearly immoral, such as inflicting fetal alcohol syndrome. Alex Gillham argues that the argument requires clarification of the meaning of greater impairment. He proposes two definitions, and points out the difficulties with each. In response, I argue that while the impairment argument’s definition of greater impairment is narrow in scope, it is sufficient for its intended purpose. Broadening (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  16
    Personhood as projection: the value of multiple conceptions of personhood for understanding the dehumanisation of people living with dementia.Paula Boddington, Andy Northcott & Katie Featherstone - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):93-106.
    We examine the concept of personhood in relation to people living with dementia and implications for the humanity of care, drawing on a body of ethnographic work. Much debate has searched for an adequate account of the person for these purposes. Broad contrasts can be made between accounts focusing on cognition and mental faculties, and accounts focusing on embodied and relational aspects of the person. Some have suggested the concept of the person is critical for good care; others suggest the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  15
    How do roles impact suicidal agents’ obligations?Suzanne E. Dowie - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):15-30.
    In this paper, I assess the role responsibility argument that claims suicidal agents have obligations to specific people not to kill themselves due to their roles. Since the plausibility of the role responsibility argument is clearest in the parent–child relationship, I assess parental obligations. I defend a view that says that normative roles, such as those of a parent, are contractual and voluntary. I then suggest that the normative parameters for some roles preclude permissible suicide because the role-related contract includes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  12
    Sharing a medical decision.Coos Engelsma - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):3-14.
    During the last decades, shared decision making (SDM) has become a very popular model for the physician-patient relationship. SDM can refer to a process (making a decision in a shared way) and a product (making a shared decision). In the literature, by far most attention is devoted to the process. In this paper, I investigate the product, wondering what is involved by a medical decision being shared. I argue that the degree to which a decision to implement a medical alternative (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  9
    Emerging perspectives in the shared decision making debate.Bert Gordijn & Henk ten Have - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):1-2.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  10
    Correction to: Precision medicine and the problem of structural injustice.Sara Green, Barbara Prainsack & Maya Sabatello - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):133-133.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  7
    The duty of care and the right to be cared for: is there a duty to treat the unvaccinated?Zohar Lederman & Shalom Corcos - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):81-91.
    Vaccine hesitancy or refusal has been one of the major obstacles to herd immunity against Covid-19 in high-income countries and one of the causes for the emergence of variants. The refusal of people who are eligible for vaccination to receive vaccination creates an ethical dilemma between the duty of healthcare professionals (HCPs) to care for patients and their right to be taken care of. This paper argues for an extended social contract between patients and society wherein vaccination against Covid-19 is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  6
    An analysis of different concepts of “identity” in the heritable genome editing debate. [REVIEW]Ying-Qi Liaw - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):121-131.
    Human heritable genome editing (HHGE) involves editing the genes of human gametes and/or early human embryos. Whilst ‘identity’ is a key concept underpinning the current HHGE debate, there is a lack of inclusive analysis on different concepts of ‘identity’ which renders the overall debate confusing at times. This paper first contributes to reviewing the existing literature by consolidating how ‘identity’ has been discussed in the HHGE debate. Essentially, the discussion will reveal an ontological and empirical understanding of identity when different (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  6
    From a critique of the principle of autonomy to an ethic of heteronomy.Florian Martinet-Kosinski - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):71-80.
    Etymologically, autonomy is the ability to give oneself rules and follow them. It is an important principle of medical ethics, which can sometimes raise some tensions in the care relationship. We propose a new definition of ethics, the ethics of heteronomy: a self-normative, discursive and responsible autonomy. Autonomy cannot be considered without the responsibility each person must have towards others. In the care relationship, autonomy would be more the ability of each person to reach out to others than the ability (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  12
    Potentiality switches and epistemic uncertainty: the Argument from Potential in times of human embryo-like structures.Ana M. Pereira Daoud, Wybo J. Dondorp, Annelien L. Bredenoord & Guido M. W. R. De Wert - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):37-48.
    Recent advancements in developmental biology enable the creation of embryo-like structures from human stem cells, which we refer to as human embryo-like structures (hELS). These structures provide promising tools to complement—and perhaps ultimately replace—the use of human embryos in clinical and fundamental research. But what if these hELS—when further improved—also have a claim to moral status? What would that imply for their research use? In this paper, we explore these questions in relation to the traditional answer as to why human (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. COVID-19 vaccine refusal as unfair free-riding.Joshua Kelsall - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy (1):1-13.
    Contributions to COVID-19 vaccination programmes promise valuable collective goods. They can support public and individual health by creating herd immunity and taking the pressure off overwhelmed public health services; support freedom of movement by enabling governments to remove restrictive lockdown policies; and improve economic and social well-being by allowing businesses, schools, and other essential public services to re-open. The vaccinated can contribute to the production of these goods. The unvaccinated, who benefit from, but who do not contribute to these goods (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues