Year:

  1.  12
    Genome Editing and Assisted Reproduction: Curing Embryos, Society or Prospective Parents?Giulia Cavaliere - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):215-225.
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  2.  19
    Dementia, Identity and the Role of Friends.Christopher Cowley - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):255-264.
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  3.  5
    Medicine and Technology. Remarks on the Notion of Responsibility in the Technology-Assisted Health Care.Waldemar Kwiatkowski - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):197-205.
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  4.  14
    Beyond Integrating Social Sciences: Reflecting on the Place of Life Sciences in Empirical Bioethics Methodologies.Marcel Mertz & Jan Schildmann - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):207-214.
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  5.  10
    Medicalising Short Children with Growth Hormone? Ethical Considerations of the Underlying Sociocultural Aspects.Maria Cristina Murano - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):243-253.
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  6. On Integrity: Conceptual Clarification.Maria do Céu Patrão Neves - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):181-187.
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  7.  8
    Medical Oath: Use and Relevance of the Declaration of Geneva. A Survey of Member Organizations of the World Medical Association.Zoé Rheinsberg, Ramin Parsa-Parsi, Otmar Kloiber & Urban Wiesing - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):189-196.
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  8.  8
    Public Trust and ‘Ethics Review’ as a Commodity: The Case of Genomics England Limited and the UK’s 100,000 Genomes Project. [REVIEW]Gabrielle Natalie Samuel & Bobbie Farsides - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):159-168.
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  9.  2
    Against the Integrative Turn in Bioethics: Burdens of Understanding.Lovro Savić & Viktor Ivanković - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):265-276.
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  10.  2
    “That is Why I Have Trust”: Unpacking What ‘Trust’ Means to Participants in International Genetic Research in Pakistan and Denmark.Zainab Sheikh & Klaus Hoeyer - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):169-179.
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  11.  5
    Trust in Healthcare and Science.Henk ten Have & Bert Gordijn - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):157-158.
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  12.  3
    Danish Sperm Donors and the Ethics of Donation and Selection.Alison Wheatley - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):227-238.
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  13.  9
    The Impossibility of Reliably Determining the Authenticity of Desires: Implications for Informed Consent.Jesper Ahlin - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):43-50.
    It is sometimes argued that autonomous decision-making requires that the decision-maker’s desires are authentic, i.e., “genuine,” “truly her own,” “not out of character,” or similar. In this article, it is argued that a method to reliably determine the authenticity (or inauthenticity) of a desire cannot be developed. A taxonomy of characteristics displayed by different theories of authenticity is introduced and applied to evaluate such theories categorically, in contrast to the prior approach of treating them individually. The conclusion is drawn that, (...)
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  14.  3
    Human Dignity as a Basis for Providing Post-Trial Access to Healthcare for Research Participants: A South African Perspective.Pamela Andanda & Jane Wathuta - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):139-155.
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  15.  12
    Should Physicians Tell the Truth Without Taking Social Complications Into Account? A Striking Case.Ercan Avci - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):23-30.
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  16.  9
    The Trilemma of Designing International Bioethics Curricula.Bert Gordijn & Henk ten Have - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):1-2.
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  17.  3
    About the Right to Be Ill.Jacek Halasz - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):113-123.
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  18.  7
    E-Health Beyond Technology: Analyzing the Paradigm Shift That Lies Beneath.Tania Moerenhout, Ignaas Devisch & Gustaaf C. Cornelis - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):31-41.
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  19.  6
    Relational Autonomy in Informed Consent as an Ethics of Care Approach to the Concept of Informed Consent.Peter I. Osuji - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):101-111.
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  20.  2
    Erasmus Mundus Master of Bioethics: A Case for an Effective Model for International Bioethics Education.Jan Piasecki, Kevin Dirksen & Hamilton Inbadas - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):3-10.
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  21.  3
    The Particularity of Dignity: Relational Engagement in Care at the End of Life.Jeannette Pols, Bernike Pasveer & Dick Willems - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):89-100.
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  22.  3
    Assumptions and Moral Understanding of the Wish to Hasten Death: A Philosophical Review of Qualitative Studies.Andrea Rodríguez-Prat & Evert van Leeuwen - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):63-75.
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  23.  16
    The History of Autonomy in Medicine From Antiquity to Principlism.Toni C. Saad - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):125-137.
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  24.  3
    The Care Dialog: The “Ethics of Care” Approach and its Importance for Clinical Ethics Consultation.Patrick Schuchter & Andreas Heller - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):51-62.
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  25.  6
    Phenomenology of Pregnancy and the Ethics of Abortion.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):77-87.
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  26.  2
    On Harm Thresholds and Living Organ Donation: Must the Living Donor Benefit, on Balance, From His Donation?Nicola Jane Williams - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):11-22.
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  27.  3
    Heidegger, Communication, and Healthcare.Casey Rentmeester - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:01-07.
    Communication between medical professionals and patients is an important aspect of therapy and patient satisfaction. Common barriers that get in the way of effective communication in this sphere include: (1) gender, age, and cultural differences; (2) physical or psychological discomfort or pain; (3) medical literacy; and (4) distraction due to technological factors or simply being overworked. The author examines these communicative barriers from a philosophical lens and then utilizes Martin Heidegger’s phenomenology and hermeneutics to provide guidance for medical professional–patient interactions. (...)
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