Nursing Inquiry

ISSN: 1320-7881

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  1.  7
    Time to treat the climate and nature crisis as one indivisible global health emergency.Kamran Abbasi, Parveen Ali, Virginia Barbour, Thomas Benfield, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, Stephen Stephen, Richard Horton, Laurie Laybourn-Langton, Robert Mash, Peush Sahni, Wadeia Mohammad Sharief, Paul Yonga & Chris Zielinski - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12612.
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  2.  6
    Critical ethnography and its others: Entanglement of matter/meaning/madness.Simon Adam, Efrat Gold & Joyce Tsui - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12576.
    Beginning with a critical examination of the humanist assumptions of critical ethnography, this article interrogates and surfaces problems with the ontological and epistemological orientations of this research methodology. In drawing on exemplar empirical data from an arts‐based project, the article demonstrates the limitations in the humanist‐based qualitative research approach and advances a postdualist, postrepresentationalist direction for critical ethnography called entangled ethnography. Using data from a larger study that examined the perspectives of racialized mad artists, what is demonstrated in this inquiry (...)
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  3.  18
    Infrahuman madness: Mental health nursing and the discursive production of alterity.Simon Adam, Cindy Jiang, Marina Mikhail & Linda Juergensen - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12533.
    By examining an exemplar sample of mental health nursing educational policies and related legislation, in this article, we trace the discursive production of madness as an “othered” identity category. We engage in a critical discourse analysis of mental health nursing education in Canada, drawing on provincial and federal policies and legislation as the main sources of data. Theoretically framed by critical posthumanism and mad studies, this article outlines how the mad subjectivity becomes decontextualized out of its identity‐based understanding and recontextualized (...)
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  4.  7
    ChatGPT answers a frequently asked question about nursing: What it is and what it is not.Matteo Danielis & Renzo Zanotti - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12620.
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  5.  10
    Notes on [post]human nursing: What It MIGHT Be, What it is Not.Jess Dillard-Wright, Jamie B. Smith, Jane Hopkins-Walsh, Eva Willis, Brandon B. Brown & Emmanuel C. Tedjasukmana - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12562.
    With this paper, we walk out some central ideas about posthumanisms and the ways in which nursing is already deeply entangled with them. At the same time, we point to ways in which nursing might benefit from further entanglement with other ideas emerging from posthumanisms. We first offer up a brief history of posthumanisms, following multiple roots to several points of formation. We then turn to key flavors of posthuman thought to differentiate between them and clarify our collective understanding and (...)
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  6.  6
    Extending the methodology of critical discourse analysis using Haraway's figurations: The example of The Monstrous Perpetrator within contemporary responses to child neglect and abuse.Rochelle Einboden, Colleen Varcoe & Trudy Rudge - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12617.
    Critical discursive analyses offer possibilities for equity‐oriented research, and are a resource for addressing resistant social problems, such as child neglect and abuse (CN&A). A key challenge for discourse analysts in health disciplines is the tensions between materiality and social constructions, particularly at the site of the body. This paper describes how Donna Haraway's ideas of figuration and technobiopower can augment critical discourse analysis to address this tension. Technobiopower, an intensification of biopower in the context of technoscience, is seen as (...)
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  7.  11
    Just‐relations and responsibility for planetary health: The global nurse agenda for climate justice.Robin Evans-Agnew, Jessica LeClair & De-Ann Sheppard - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12563.
    There is an urgent call for nurses to address climate change, especially in advocating for those most under threat to the impacts. Social justice is important to nurses in their relations with individuals and populations, including actions to address climate justice. The purpose of this article is to present a Global Nurse Agenda for Climate Justice to spark dialog, provide direction, and to promote nursing action for just‐relations and responsibility for planetary health. Grounding ourselves within the Mi'kmaw concept of Etuaptmumk (...)
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  8.  11
    Toward an ontology of the mutant in the health sciences: Re/defining the person from Cronenberg's perspective.Dave Holmes, Pier-Luc Turcotte, Simon Adam, Jim Johansson & Lauren Orser - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12599.
    Traditional health sciences (including nursing) paradigms, conceptual models, and theories have relied heavily upon notions of the ‘person’ or ‘patient’ that are deeply rooted in humanistic principles. Our intention here, as a collective academic assemblage, is to question taken‐for‐granted definitions and assumptions of the ‘person’ from a critical posthumanist perspective. To do so, the cinematic works of filmmaker David Cronenberg offer a radical perspective to revisit our understanding of the ‘person’ in nursing and beyond. Cronenberg's work explores bodily transformation and (...)
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  9.  9
    “Recovery” in mental health services, now and then: A poststructuralist examination of the despotic State machine's effects.Jim A. Johansson & Dave Holmes - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12558.
    Recovery is a model of care in (forensic) mental health settings across Western nations that aims to move past the paternalistic and punitive models of institutional care of the 20th century and toward more patient‐centered approaches. But as we argue in this paper, the recovery‐oriented services that evolved out of the early stages of this liberating movement signaled a shift in nursing practices that cannot be viewed only as improvements. In effect, as “recovery” nursing practices became more established, more codified, (...)
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  10.  12
    When to err is inhuman: An examination of the influence of artificial intelligence‐driven nursing care on patient safety.Elizabeth A. Johnson, Katherine M. Dudding & Jane M. Carrington - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12583.
    Artificial intelligence, as a nonhuman entity, is increasingly used to inform, direct, or supplant nursing care and clinical decision‐making. The boundaries between human‐ and nonhuman‐driven nursing care are blurred with the advent of sensors, wearables, camera devices, and humanoid robots at such an accelerated pace that the critical evaluation of its influence on patient safety has not been fully assessed. Since the pivotal release of To Err is Human, patient safety is being challenged by the dynamic healthcare environment like never (...)
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  11.  12
    Beyond the insider/outsider debate in “at‐home” ethnographies: Diffractive methodology and the onto‐epistemic entanglement of knowledge production.Trine S. Larsen & Nete Schwennesen - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12611.
    In this article, we discuss the practice of conducting research in one's own field, in this case, from a position as a researcher with a nursing background doing fieldwork in a hospital and in one's own organization, an orthopedic surgical department. We show how an “insider” researcher position paves the way for analytical insights about sleep as an institutional phenomenon in the orthopedic surgical infrastructure and how acute and elective patient trajectories differ but build on the same logic, creating the (...)
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  12.  10
    Thinking through critical posthumanism: Nursing as political and affirmative becoming.Annie-Claude Laurin & Patrick Martin - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12606.
    As a rejection and continuous reframing of theoretical humanism, critical posthumanism questions and imagines the human condition in the current context, aligning it with nonhuman and more than human entities, past and future. While this philosophical approach has been referenced in many academic disciplines since the 1990s, it has been gradually garnering interest among nursing scholars, leading to questions such as what it means to be human and what it means to be a nurse in the here and now. As (...)
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  13.  10
    On the bullshitisation of mental health nursing: A reluctant work rant.Mick McKeown - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12595.
    This discussion paper offers a critical provocation to my mental health nursing colleagues. Drawing upon David Graeber's account of bullshit work, work that is increasingly meaningless for workers, I pose the question: Is mental health nursing a bullshit job? Ever‐increasing time spent on record keeping as opposed to direct care appears to represent a Graeberian bullshitisation of mental health nurses' work. In addition, core aspects of the role are not immune from bullshit. Professional rhetoric would have us believe that mental (...)
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  14.  7
    Sharing the space of the creature: Intersubjectivity as a lens toward mutual human–wildlife dignity.Donna J. Perry - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12587.
    Human–wildlife coexistence is critical for sustainable and healthy ecosystems as well as to prevent human and wildlife suffering. In this paper, an intersubjective approach to human–wildlife interactions is proposed as a lens toward human decentering and emergent mutual evolution. The thesis is developed through a secondary data analysis of a research study on wildlife care and philosophical analysis using the work of Bernard Lonergan and Edmund Husserl. The study was conducted using the theory of transcendent pluralism, which is grounded in (...)
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  15.  7
    The contested status of theory/theorizing and humanism/posthumanism in Olga Petrovskaya's Nursing theory, postmodernism, poststructualism, and Foucault.Keith Robinson & Miriam Bender - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12566.
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  16.  11
    We a ll c are, ALL the time.Jamie B. Smith, Goda Klumbytė, Kay Sidebottom, Jess Dillard-Wright, Eva Willis, Brandon B. Brown & Jane Hopkins-Walsh - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12572.
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  17.  11
    The Vitruvian nurse and burnout: New materialist approaches to impossible ideals.Jamie Smith, Eva Willis, Jane Hopkins-Walsh, Jess Dillard-Wright & Brandon Brown - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12538.
    The Vitruvian Man is a metaphor for the “ideal man” by feminist posthuman philosopher Rosi Braidotti (2013) as a proxy for eurocentric humanist ideals. The first half of this paper extends Braidotti's concept by thinking about the metaphor of the “ideal nurse” (Vitruvian nurse) and how this metaphor contributes to racism, oppression, and burnout in nursing and might restrict the professionalization of nursing. The Vitruvian nurse is an idealized and perfected form of a nurse with self‐sacrificial language (re)producing self‐sacrificing expectations. (...)
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  18.  2
    Exploring that which lies beyond nursing's historic humanist preoccupation.Sally Thorne - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12623.
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