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  1.  4
    Enhancing the Imago Dei: Can a Christian Be a Transhumanist?Jason T. Eberl - 2022 - Christian Bioethics 28 (1):76-93.
    Transhumanism is an ideology that embraces the use of various forms of biotechnology to enhance human beings toward the emergence of a “posthuman” kind. In this article, I contrast some of the foundational tenets of Transhumanism with those of Christianity, primarily focusing on their respective anthropologies—that is, their diverse understandings of whether there is an essential nature shared by all human persons and, if so, whether certain features of human nature may be intentionally altered in ways that contribute toward how (...)
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  2.  2
    (Re)-Emerging Challenges in Christian Bioethics: Leading Voices in Christian Bioethics.Ana Iltis - 2022 - Christian Bioethics 28 (1):1-10.
    This is the third installment in a Christian Bioethics series that gathers leading voices in Christian bioethics to examine the themes and issues they find most pressing. The papers address fundamental theoretical questions about the nature of Christian bioethics itself, long-standing ethical issues that remain significant today, including physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, the definition of death, the allocation of scarce resources, and finally, more futuristic questions regarding transhumanism. The contributions underscore the enduring significance of Christian engagement in bioethics.
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  3.  3
    Desmond Tutu, George Carey and the Legalization of Euthanasia: A Response.John Keown - 2022 - Christian Bioethics 28 (1):25-40.
    When two Christian prelates as internationally prominent as Desmond Tutu and George Carey call for the legalization of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, their arguments merit close consideration. This article sets out and evaluates their arguments. It concludes that the prelates rehearse the superficial case regularly advanced by euthanasia campaigners and fail adequately to engage with the arguments, both principled and practical, against legalization.
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  4.  3
    Brain Death, the Soul, and Material Dispositions.Patrick Lee - 2022 - Christian Bioethics 28 (1):41-57.
    I defend the position argued previously by Germain Grisez and me that total brain death is a valid criterion of death on the grounds that a human being is essentially a rational animal, and a brain-dead body lacks the radical capacity for rational actions. I reply to Josef Seifert’s objection that our positions rest on a reductionist view of the human person, and to other objections concerning the inter-relation between the human soul, its powers, and functions of the brain. I (...)
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  5.  1
    Christian Bioethics: Reflections on a Quarter-Century with the Journal.B. Andrew Lustig - 2022 - Christian Bioethics 28 (1):11-24.
    This essay reflects on 25 years since Christian Bioethics began publication and, in somewhat autobiographical fashion, engages two core concerns. First, although “non-ecumenism” may often appear a pretext for contention and division, I suggest that a respectful non-ecumenism may provide the opportunity for dialogue and the occasion for employing certain tools from religious studies. Second, although many are skeptical about the possibilities of identifying a “common morality,” a defense of that notion provides a plausible explanation for the development of limited (...)
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  6.  2
    Tragic Choices, Revisited: COVID-19 and the Hidden Ethics of Rationing.Maura A. Ryan - 2022 - Christian Bioethics 28 (1):58-75.
    Early in the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, concern that there could be a shortage of ventilators raised the possibility of rationing care. Denying patients life-saving care captures our moral imagination, prompting the demand for a defensible framework of ethical principles for determining who will live and who will die. Behind the moral dilemma posed by the shortage of a particular medical good lies a broad moral geography encompassing important and often unarticulated societal values, as well as assumptions about (...)
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