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  1.  6
    The predictive factors of moral courage among hospital nurses.Maryam Dehghani, Roghieh Nazari, Hamid Sharif-Nia, Noushin Mousazadeh & Hamideh Hakimi - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundHaving moral courage is a crucial characteristic for nurses to handle ethical quandaries, stay true to their professional obligations towards patients, and uphold ethical principles. This concept can be influenced by various factors including personal, professional, organizational, and leadership considerations. The purpose of this study was to explore the predictors of moral courage among nurses working in hospitals.MethodsIn 2018, an observational cross-sectional study was carried out on 267 nurses employed in six hospitals located in the northern region of Iran. The (...)
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  2.  17
    Death pluralism: a proposal.Gonzalo Díaz-Cobacho, Alberto Molina-Pérez & David Rodríguez-Arias - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-12.
    The debate over the determination of death has been raging for more than fifty years. Since then, objections against the diagnosis of brain death from family members of those diagnosed as dead-have been increasing and are causing some countries to take novel steps to accommodate people’s beliefs and preferences in the determination of death. This, coupled with criticism by some academics of the brain death criterion, raises some questions about the issues surrounding the determination of death. In this paper, we (...)
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  3.  1
    Admitting the heterogeneity of social inequalities: intersectionality as a (self-)critical framework and tool within mental health care.Florian Funer - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-9.
    Inequities shape the everyday experiences and life chances of individuals at the margins of societies and are often associated with lower health and particular challenges in accessing quality treatment and support. This fact is even more dramatic for those individuals who live at the nexus of different marginalized groups and thus may face multiple discrimination, stigma, and oppression. To address these multiple social and structural disadvantages, intersectional approaches have recently gained a foothold, especially in the public health field. This study (...)
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  4.  4
    Mobile homes in the land of illness: the hospitality and hostility of language in doctor-patient relations.Stephen R. Milford - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-7.
    Illness has a way of disorientating us, as if we are cast adrift in a foreign land. Like strangers in a dessert we seek oasis to recollect ourselves, find refuge and learn to build our own shelters. Using the philosophy of Levinas and Derrida, we can interpret health care providers (HCP), and the sites from which they act (e.g. hospitals), as _dwelling hosts_ that offer hospitality to strangers in this foreign land. While often the dwellings are physical (e.g. hospitals), this (...)
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  5.  12
    Accountability as a virtue in medicine: from theory to practice.John R. Peteet, Charlotte V. O. Witvliet, Gerrit Glas & Benjamin W. Frush - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-6.
    Accountability is a norm basic to several aspects of medical practice. We explore here the benefits of a more explicit focus on the virtue of accountability, which as distinct from the state of being held accountable, entails both welcoming responsibility to others and welcoming input from others. Practicing accountably can limit moral distress caused by institutional pressures on the doctor patient relationship. Fostering a mindset that is welcoming rather than resistant to feedback is critical to enhancing a culture of learning. (...)
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  6.  10
    Cryonics, euthanasia, and the doctrine of double effect. [REVIEW]Maria Campo Redondo & Gabriel Andrade - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-10.
    In 1989, Thomas Donaldson requested the California courts to allow physicians to hasten his death. Donaldson had been diagnosed with brain cancer, and he desired to die in order to cryonically preserve his brain, so as to stop its further deterioration. This case elicits an important question: is this a case of euthanasia? In this article, we examine the traditional criteria of death, and contrast it with the information-theoretic criterion. If this criterion is accepted, we posit that Donaldson’s case would (...)
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  7. A quantitative survey measure of moral evaluations of patient substance misuse among health professionals in California, urban France, and urban China.Alan W. Stacy, Kim D. Reynolds, Bin Xie, Pengchong Zhou, Curtis Lehmann & Anna Yu Lee - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundThe merits and drawbacks of moral relevance models of addiction have predominantly been discussed theoretically, without empirical evidence of these potential effects. This study develops and evaluates a novel survey measure for assessing moral evaluations of patient substance misuse (ME-PSM).MethodsThis measure was tested on 524 health professionals (i.e., physicians, nurses, and other health professionals) in California (n = 173), urban France (n = 102), and urban China (n = 249). Demographic factors associated with ME-PSM were investigated using analyses of variance (...)
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  8.  6
    Leaving no one behind: successful ageing at the intersection of ageism and ableism.Merle Weßel & Elisabeth Langmann - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundThe concept of ‘successful ageing’ has been a prominent focus within the field of gerontology for several decades. However, despite the widespread attention paid to this concept, its intersectional implications have not been fully explored yet. This paper aims to address this gap by analyzing the potential ageist and ableist biases in the discourse of successful ageing through an intersectional lens.MethodA critical feminist perspective is taken to examine the sensitivity of the discourse of successful ageing to diversity in societies. The (...)
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  9.  4
    Moral lessons from residents, close relatives and volunteers about the COVID-19 restrictions in Dutch and Flemish nursing homes.Sytse Zuidema, Annerieke Stoop, Jasper de Witte, Floor Vinckers, Suzie Noten, Nina Hovenga & Elleke Landeweer - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundDuring the COVID-19 outbreak in 2020, national governments took restrictive measures, such as a visitors ban, prohibition of group activities and quarantine, to protect nursing home residents against infections. As ‘safety’ prevailed, residents and close relatives had no choice but to accept the restrictions. Their perspectives are relevant because the policies had a major impact on them, but they were excluded from the policy decisions. In this study we looked into the moral attitudes of residents, close relatives and volunteers regarding (...)
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