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  1.  3
    How to Deal with the Consent of Adults with Cognitive Impairment Involved in European Geriatric Living Labs? [REVIEW]Cédric Annweiler, Philippe Allain, Marine Asfar, Loïc Carballido, Catherine Hue, Frédéric Blazek, Frédéric Noublanche & Guillaume Sacco - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-6.
    BackgroundLiving labs are realistic environments designed to create links between technology developers and end-users. Research in LLH covers a wide range of studies from non-interventional studies to CT and should involve patients with neurocognitive disorders. However, the ethical issues raised by the design, development, and implementation of research and development projects in LLH have been the subject of only little interest thus far.ObjectiveOur aim was to determine a pragmatic, ethical and regulatory correct approach to seek the informed consent of patients (...)
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  2.  1
    The Pharmaceuticalisation of Life? A Fictional Case Report of Insomnia with a Thought Experiment.Emmanuel Bäckryd - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundThe safety of sleeping pills has increased dramatically during the last 100 years, from barbiturates to bensodiazepines to modern day so-called Z-drugs.MethodsThe circumstances of prescribing sleeping pills in the early 20th century are illustrated by summarizing the main storyline of a novel by Swedish writer Vilhelm Moberg. This is followed by a thought experiment and a theoretical discussion.ResultsIn his 1937 novel Sömnlös Vilhelm Moberg portrayed existential and relational distress in relation to insomnia. In a thought experiment, past progresses in sleeping (...)
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  3.  2
    Phenomenology, Saudi Arabia, and an Argument for the Standardization of Clinical Ethics Consultation.Abram Brummett & Ruaim Muaygil - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-9.
    Background The purpose of this study is to make a philosophical argument against the phenomenological critique of standardization in clinical ethics. We used the context of clinical ethics in Saudi Arabia to demonstrate the importance of credentialing clinical ethicists. Methods Philosophical methods of argumentation and conceptual analysis were used. Results We found the phenomenological critique of standardization to be flawed because it relies on a series of false dichotomies. Conclusions We concluded that the phenomenological framing of the credentialing debate relies (...)
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  4.  2
    Transforming Trash to Treasure Cultural Ambiguity in Foetal Cell Research.Kristofer Hansson, Håkan Widner, Åsa Mäkitalo, Susanne Lundin & Andréa Wiszmeg - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundRich in different kind of potent cells, embryos are used in modern regenerative medicine and research. Neurobiologists today are pushing the boundaries for what can be done with embryos existing in the transitory margins of medicine. Therefore, there is a growing need to develop conceptual frameworks for interpreting the transformative cultural, biological and technical processes involving these aborted, donated and marginal embryos. This article is a contribution to this development of frameworks.MethodsThis article examines different emotional, cognitive and discursive strategies used (...)
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  5.  1
    Exploring Perception and Usage of Narrative Medicine by Physician Specialty: A Qualitative Analysis.Joshua M. Hauser & Daniel A. Fox - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundNarrative medicine is a well-recognized and respected approach to care. It is now found in medical school curricula and widely implemented in practice. However, there has been no analysis of the perception and usage of narrative medicine across different medical specialties and whether there may be unique recommendations for implementation based upon specialty. The aims of this study were to explore these gaps in research.MethodsFifteen senior physicians who specialize in internal medicine, pediatrics, or surgery were interviewed in a semi-structured format (...)
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  6.  5
    The role of philosophy and ethics at the edges of medicine.Bjørn Hofmann - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundThe edge metaphor is ubiquitous in describing the present situation in the world, and nowhere is this as clearly visible as in medicine. “The edge of medicine” has become the title of books, scholarly articles, media headlines, and lecture series and seems to be imbued with hype, hope, and aversion. In order better to understand what is at stake at “the edge of medicine” this article addresses three questions: What does “the edge of medicine” mean in contemporary debates on modern (...)
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  7.  5
    The intractable problems with brain death and possible solutions.Ari R. Joffe, Gurpreet Khaira & Allan R. de Caen - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-27.
    Brain death has been accepted worldwide medically and legally as the biological state of death of the organism. Nevertheless, the literature has described persistent problems with this acceptance ever since brain death was described. Many of these problems are not widely known or properly understood by much of the medical community. Here we aim to clarify these issues, based on the two intractable problems in the brain death debates. First, the metaphysical problem: there is no reason that withstands critical scrutiny (...)
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  8.  1
    Indigenous knowledge around the ethics of human research from the Oceania region: A scoping literature review.Etivina Lovo, Lynn Woodward, Sarah Larkins, Robyn Preston & Unaisi Nabobo Baba - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundMany indigenous people have died or been harmed because of inadequately monitored research. Strong regulations in Human Research Ethics are required to address these injustices and to ensure that peoples’ participation in health research is safe. Indigenous peoples advocate that research that respects indigenous principles can contribute to addressing their health inequities. This scoping literature review aims to analyze existing peer reviewed and grey literature to explore how indigenous values and principles from countries of Oceania are incorporated into HRE and (...)
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  9.  2
    Virtue and Medical Ethics Education.Will Lyon - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-4.
    The traditional structure of medical school curriculum in the United States consists of 2 years of pre-clinical study followed by 2 years of clinical rotations. In this essay, I propose that this curricular approach stems from the understanding that medicine is both a science, or a body of knowledge, as well as an art, or a craft that is practiced. I then argue that this distinction between science and art is also relevant to the field of medical ethics, and that (...)
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  10.  1
    The standardization of clinical ethics consultation and technique’s “long encirclement” of humanity: a response to Brummett and Muaygil.Benjamin N. Parks & Jordan Mason - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-5.
    In their recent article, Brummett and Muaygil reject Bishop et al.’s framing of the debate over standardization in clinical ethics consultation “as one between pro-credentialing procedural and anti-credentialing phenomenological,” claiming that this framing “amounts to a false dichotomy between two extreme approaches to CEC.” Instead of accepting proceduralism and phenomenology as a binary, Brummett and Muaygil propose that these two views should be seen as the extreme ends of a spectrum upon which CEC should be done. However, as evidenced by (...)
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  11.  2
    On the Arts and Humanities in Medical Education.Danielle G. Rabinowitz - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-5.
    This paper aims to position the birth of the Medical Humanities movement in a greater historical context of twentieth century American medical education and to paint a picture of the current landscape of the Medical Humanities in medical training. It first sheds light on the model of medical education put forth by Abraham Flexner through the publishing of the 1910 Flexner Report, which set the stage for defining physicians as experimentalists and rooting the profession in research institutions. While this paved (...)
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  12.  2
    Mapping out epistemic justice in the clinical space: using narrative techniques to affirm patients as knowers.Leah Teresa Rosen - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-6.
    Epistemic injustice sits at the intersection of ethics, epistemology, and social justice. Generally, this philosophical term describes when a person is wrongfully discredited as a knower; and within the clinical space, epistemic injustice is the underlying reason that some patient testimonies are valued above others. The following essay seeks to connect patterns of social prejudice to the clinical realm in the United States: illustrating how factors such as race, gender identity, and socioeconomic status influence epistemic credence and associatively, the quality (...)
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  13.  1
    The Worldwide Investigating Nurses’ Attitudes Towards Do-Not-Resuscitate Order: A Review. [REVIEW]Nader Salari, Alireza Abdi, Rostam Jalali, Samira Raoofi & Neda Raoofi - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundThe acceptance or practical application of the do-not-resuscitate order is substantially dependent on internal or personal factors; in a way that decision-making about this issue can be specific to each person. Moreover, most nurses feel morally and emotionally stressed and confused during the process decision-making regarding DNR order. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate nurses’ attitudes towards DNR order in a systematic review.MethodsThis critical survey was conducted using a systematic review protocol. To this end, the most (...)
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  14.  3
    The Downgrading of Pain Sufferers’ Credibility.Mar Rosàs Tosas - 2021 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 16 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundThe evaluation of pain remains one of the most difficult challenges that healthcare practitioners face. Chronic pain appears to affect more than 35% of the population in the West, and indeed, pain is the most common reason patients seek medical care. Despite its ubiquity, studies in the last decades reveal that many patients feel their pain is dismissed by healthcare practitioners and that, as a result, they are denied proper medical care. Buchman, Ho, and Goldberg point to this phenomenon as (...)
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