Year:

  1.  8
    Repoliticizing Environmentalism: Beyond Technocracy and Populism.Carlo Invernizzi Accetti - 2021 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 33 (1):47-73.
    ABSTRACT The mainstreaming of environmental concerns paradoxically obscures their political dimension: as the goals of environmentalism become accepted, they are reduced to administrative problems to be solved in a purely technocratic way. This technocratic environmentalism has fueled a populist backlash that challenges the scientific basis of environmentalism. As a result, contemporary environmentalism appears to be stuck in a depoliticizing opposition between technocracy and populism. A possible way out of this depoliticizing trap consists in recognizing the intrinsic contestability of the core (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  1
    Material Heuristics and Attitudes Toward Redistribution.Diogo Ferrari - 2021 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 33 (1):25-46.
    ABSTRACT According to the material-heuristics hypothesis, people’s socioeconomic position affects their perceptions about the socioeconomic environment, including how society distributes opportunities and rewards and to what extent people are responsible for their own economic situation. These perceptions, in turn, affect attitudes toward wealth redistribution. In contrast to the material-heuristics hypothesis are the more familiar material self-interest hypothesis, which relates redistributive attitudes to one’s personal interest in gaining or losing from redistribution; and the self-serving reasoning hypothesis, according to which perceptions of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  5
    An Epistemic Case for Positive Voting Duties.Carline Klijnman - 2021 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 33 (1):74-101.
    In response to widespread voter ignorance, Jason Brennan argues for a voting ethics that can be summarized as one negative duty: do not vote badly. The implication that abstaining is always permissible entails no incentive for citizens to become competent voters or to vote once competent. Following the Condorcet Jury Theorem, this can lead to suboptimal outcomes, suggesting that voter turnout should concern instrumentalist epistemic accounts of democratic legitimacy. This could be addressed by adding two positive voting duties: to make (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  8
    Anxiety as a Positive Epistemic Emotion in Politics.Antonia Rosati, Florencia Guglielmetti & Leandro De Brasi - 2021 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 33 (1):1-24.
    ABSTRACT People suffer from a variety of cognitive shortcomings when forming and updating their political beliefs. Three pervasive shortcomings are confirmation bias, disconfirmation bias, and motivated reasoning. The emotional state of anxiety can help us overcome these biases given the open-minded, information-rich, reflective deliberation with diverse people it may promote—although mass and social media may hinder this type of deliberation.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  5
    Ideas and Their Consequences: Benjamin Harrison and the Seeds of Economic Crisis, 1889-1893.Mark Zachary Taylor - 2021 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 33 (1):102-127.
    ABSTRACT The little-studied presidency of Benjamin Harrison offers valuable insights into the surprising role that political ideas can play in government. Harrison was a highly qualified president who demonstrated energetic leadership and political skill, but whose ideological commitment to the Republican party as a quasi-sacred enterprise overrode other important considerations, thereby contributing to one of the greatest economic catastrophes in U.S. history: the Depression of 1893-1897. His ideas about the Republican party were forged in its early years, when it led (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  14
    Positivism or Understanding? The Complexity of Analyzing the Objectives of Armed Opposition Groups.Aleksi Ylönen - 2021 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 33 (1):128-144.
    The analysis of armed opposition groups is heavily tainted by gross categorizations and labeling. Using vague terms that reduce the objectives of such groups to a uniform binary of secessionist or reformist defies their ideational complexity, undermining the effort to gain a nuanced and in-depth understanding of their actual motives. A closer look into the Ogaden National Liberation Front in Ethiopia reveals the type of complexity we might expect to find in armed opposition groups’ objectives, and thus the problem with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues