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  1.  5
    Counting the Days, Not Living Them: You Will Die at Twenty, Directed by Amjad Abu Alala, 2019.Robert C. Abrams - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):503-504.
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  2.  5
    Dwelling in Strangeness: Accounts of the Kingsley Hall Community, London (1965-1970), Established by R. D. Laing.Adrian Chapman - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):471-494.
    This article explores archival accounts of the experimental community, Kingsley Hall, established by R. D. Laing, the radical Scottish psychiatrist. The paper contributes to renewed interest in Kingsley Hall, R. D. Laing's radical psychiatry and UK counterculture. Archival sources enable not only the further exploration of already known figures but also let us hear previously unheard voices. Following a discussion of archival materials, the Hall is analyzed thematically and historically as an inner spaceship; an embattled middle-class countercultural plantation; a site (...)
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  3.  4
    Re-thinking the Narrative in Narrative Medicine: The Example of Post-War French Literature.Catherine Dhavernas - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):325-336.
    Medicine and the humanities have been exploring new ways to improve the quality of healthcare. One such collaboration is the practice of narrative medicine which uses literature to teach physicians to better meet their patients’ needs. Narrative medicine, however, draws primarily from Anglophone literature, yet post-war French literature, philosophy and criticism have much to add to the theoretical and practical underpinnings of narrative medicine. As well, such scholarship provokes a number of questions that expose certain weaknesses in narrative medicine as (...)
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  4.  22
    Thirteen Reasons Why Revisited: A Monograph for Teens, Parents, and Mental Health Professionals.Douglas D’Agati, Mary Beth Beaudry & Karen Swartz - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):345-353.
    Jay Asher’s novel Thirteen Reasons Why and its Netflix adaptation have enjoyed widespread popularity. While they draw needed attention to issues like bullying and teen estrangement, they may have an unintended effect: they mislead about the etiology of suicide and even glamorize it to a degree. The medical literature has shown that suicide is almost always the result of psychiatric disorder, not provocative stress, in much the same way an asthmatic crisis is primarily the result of an underlying medical condition, (...)
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  5.  3
    Metagnosis: Revelatory Narratives of Health and Identity by Danielle Spencer.Arthur W. Frank - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):499-501.
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  6.  2
    Metagnosis: Revelatory Narratives of Health and Identity by Danielle Spencer: New York: Oxford University Press, 2021. [REVIEW]Arthur W. Frank - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):499-501.
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  7.  5
    Designing Babies: How Technology is Changing the Ways We Create Children by Robert L. Klitzman, New York: Oxford University Press, 2020. [REVIEW]Kirsten Gardner - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):495-497.
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  8.  4
    How Artistic Representation Can Inform Current Debates About Chimeras.Robert Klitzman - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):337-343.
    Researchers have increasingly been creating chimeras – combinations of cells from two species – raising profound ethical, social and scientific controversies. Such research could lead to the creation of animals such as pigs that contain human organs for transplantation, yet public fears have emerged. Scientists have thus called for enhanced public education and discussion, but these efforts require comprehension of the nature of public concerns. While arguments have viewed chimeras as either “good” or “bad,” artists have long depicted chimeras in (...)
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  9.  8
    The Corner Liquor Store: Rethinking Toxicity in the Black Metropolis.Naa Oyo A. Kwate - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):307-323.
    Liquor stores have been repeatedly shown to be disproportionately prevalent in Black neighborhoods and therefore constitute a disproportionate health risk. This paper examines the ways in which liquor stores jeopardize Black lives through social and material conditions that are broader than health risk. Embodying and perpetuating dysfunctional markets, liquor stores relegate Black consumers to an overabundance of inexpensive and potent alcoholic beverages sold from heavily securitized storefronts and provoke conflicted and oppositional relationships. Liquor stores exist in a state of antibiosis (...)
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  10.  4
    Ether Dome.Isabel Cristina Legarda - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):505-506.
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  11.  2
    Poppies, Bloom.Tommaso Lupia, Giacomo Stroffolini & Francesco G. De Rosa - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):507-510.
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  12.  17
    The Ins and Outs of ‘Schizophrenia’: Considering Diagnostic Terms as Ordinary Linguistic Expressions.Anke Maatz & Yvonne Ilg - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):387-404.
    Diagnostic terms in psychiatry like ‘schizophrenia’ and ‘bipolar disorder’ are deeply contested in the professional community, by mental health activists and the public. In this paper, we provide a theoretical framework for considering diagnostic terms as ordinary linguistic expressions and illustrate this approach by a corpus linguistic analysis of ‘schizophrenia.’ Our aim is to show how a focus on language itself can inform current and future debates about psychiatric terminology and provide new insights on relevant processes concerning their actual usage (...)
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  13.  5
    Unnatural Resources: The Colonial Logic of the Holmesburg Prison Experiments.Jennifer MacLure - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):423-433.
    This article focuses on medical trials performed by Dr. Albert Kligman on the inmates of Philadelphia's Holmesburg Prison between 1951 and 1974, which have been widely criticized as exploitative. I seek to investigate the mechanics behind the “ethical blind spot” that enabled the American medical community to laud Kligman for his efforts while simultaneously condemning the medical atrocities of the Holocaust and supporting the development of the Nuremberg Code. I argue that this nonrecognition hinges on a colonial logic by which (...)
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  14.  8
    Does Addiction Have A Subject?: Desire in Contemporary U.S. Culture.Jaeyoon Park - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):435-452.
    This paper traces the emergence of a new figure of the desiring subject in contemporary addiction science and in three other recent cultural developments: the rise of cognitive-behavior therapy, the self-tracking movement, and the dissemination of ratings. In each, the subject’s desire becomes newly figured as a response to objects rather than a manifestation of the soul, measured numerically rather than expressed in language and rendered impersonal rather than individualizing. Together, these developments suggest a shift in the dominant form of (...)
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  15.  5
    Self-Injury in Japanese Manga: A Content Analysis.Yukari Seko & Minako Kikuchi - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):355-369.
    This study explored representations of self-injury in Japanese manga. A content analysis of fifteen slice-of-life manga published between 2000-2017 was conducted, focusing on forty scenes that depict eighteen characters engaging in self-injury. Most depictions of self-injury reflect a stereotypical perception of “self-injurer,” a young girl cutting herself to cope with negative emotion. Characters receive informal support from friends and partners, while parents are portrayed as unsupportive and even triggering. An emergent trend was observed among manga targeting male readers to label (...)
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  16.  6
    Reclaiming Sex.Minna Wybrecht - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (3):511-511.
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  17.  7
    Mediating Trauma and Anxiety: Letters to Françoise Dolto, 1976-1978.Richard Bates - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):269-276.
    Françoise Dolto was a prominent French cultural figure thanks to her practice of dispensing psychoanalytically-informed child-rearing advice via the radio. From 1976 to 1978, on her show Lorsque l’enfant paraît, she responded to thousands of letters sent in by listeners requesting help with parenting problems and personal questions of a psychological nature. The article explores Dolto’s cultural position as a child psychoanalyst – understood in the 1960s and 1970s as a radical profession – but from a conservative, Catholic background. It (...)
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  18.  4
    Introduction: Trauma and Textualities.Brian Brown, Ricardo Rato Rodrigues, Charley Baker & Paul Crawford - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):209-211.
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  19.  3
    Bearing Witness: Religious Meanings in Bioethics by Courtney Campbell, Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2019.Nathan Carlin - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):289-294.
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  20.  3
    Theatres of Trauma, Transcendence and Transformation.Julie Gosling & Caroline Fox - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):279-288.
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  21.  9
    Knickknacks.Laura Guidry-Grimes - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):303-305.
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  22.  4
    Silent Voices: Exploring Narratives of Women's Experiences of Health Care Professional Responses to Domestic Violence and Abuse.Julie McGarry & Kathryn Hinsliff-Smith - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):245-252.
    The impact of domestic violence and abuse is far reaching not least in terms of both the immediate and longer term physical and mental wellbeing of those who have experienced abuse. DVA also exerts a considerable detrimental impact on the wider family including children. While professional perspectives of working with DVA survivors is increasingly well documented, there remains a paucity of accounts of encounters with healthcare services and/or healthcare professionals from survivors of DVA themselves. A central aim of this study (...)
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  23.  3
    “Through blackening pools of blood”: Trauma and Translation in Robert Graves’s The Anger of Achilles.Laura McKenzie - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):253-261.
    The Anger of Achilles, Robert Graves’ 1959 translation of Homer’s Iliad, has been variously dismissed by classical scholars as an ‘outrageous sortie into the field of translation’ and a work of ‘sheer egotism’, marred by its author’s ‘scattered yapping’. And yet, it can be read with greater understanding if we approach it not merely as a literary anomaly, but as a refraction of Graves’ experience of ‘Shell Shock,’ or PTSD, following his front line service during the First World War. This (...)
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  24.  4
    Nature Trauma: Ecology and the Returning Soldier in First World War English and Scottish Fiction, 1918–1932.Samantha Walton - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):213-223.
    Nature has been widely represented in literature and culture as healing, redemptive, unspoilt, and restorative. In the aftermath of the First World War, writers grappled with long cultural associations between nature and healing. Having survived a conflict in which relations between people, and the living environment had been catastrophically ruptured, writers asked: could rural and wild places offer meaningful sites of solace and recovery for traumatised soldiers? In Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway, Rebecca West’s The Return of the Soldier, Nan Shepherd’s (...)
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  25.  5
    Visual Representations of Physical Trauma: A Medical Pedagogy.Caroline Wellbery - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):225-233.
    Incorporating a discussion of physical and emotional trauma in medical education can help prepare students for their encounters with trauma survivors in clinical practice. A pedagogical approach begins with an inquiry into the purpose of historical or current representations of torture. Justifications include rationalizing state-sponsored torture, providing an outlet for critique and protest, and organizing representations of the enemy. Discussions of torture must further address the emotional and symbolic effects of clinical work with torture survivors on the caregiver. Introductory workshops (...)
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  26.  10
    Lacan on Trauma and Causality: A Psychoanalytic Critique of Post-Traumatic Stress/Growth.Colin Wright - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):235-244.
    This article makes the case for the largely unacknowledged relevance of the thought of the French psychoanalyst, Jacques Lacan, for the emerging field of the medical and/or health humanities. From the 1930s all the way through to the late 1970s, Lacan was deeply concerned with the ethical and political consequences of then-dominant conceptions of the human in the ‘psy’ disciplines. His attempt to ‘humanise’ these disciplines involved an emphasis on humans as symbolic beings, inevitably entangled in the structures of speech (...)
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  27.  10
    When Harry Became Sally: Responding to the Transgender Moment by Ryan T Anderson: New York: Encounter Books, 2018.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):195-199.
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  28.  8
    When Harry Became Sally: Responding to the Transgender Moment by Ryan T Anderson: New York: Encounter Books, 2018.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):195-199.
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  29.  5
    Reading for Pandemic: Viral Modernism by Elizabeth Outka, New York: Columbia University Press, 2020.Rachel Conrad Bracken - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):109-114.
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  30.  6
    Inflorescence of Mistrust.Brent R. Carr - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):119-119.
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  31.  12
    The Poetics and Politics of Alzheimer’s Disease Life-Writing by Martina Zimmermann, London, UK: Palgrave McMillan, 2017.Kathryn Lafferty Danner - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):201-203.
  32.  3
    Virile Infertile Men, and Other Representations of In/Fertile Hegemonic Masculinity in Fiction Television Series.Marjolein Lotte de Boer - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):147-164.
    Fiction television series are one of the few cultural expressions in which men’s infertility experiences are represented. Through a content analysis of twenty fiction series, this article describes and analyzes such representations. By drawing on Connell’s concept of hegemonic masculinity and Ricoeur’s understanding of paradoxical power structuring, four character types of infertile men are identified: the virile in/fertile man, the secretly non-/vasectomized man, the intellectual eunuch, the enslaving post-apocalyptic man. While these various dramatis persona outline different ways of how infertile (...)
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  33.  5
    Letting Go of Familiar Narratives as Tragic Optimism in the Era of COVID-19.Anna Gotlib - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):81-101.
    The ongoing trauma of COVID-19 will no doubt mark entire generations in ways inherent in an unmanaged global pandemic. The question that I ask is why this ongoing trauma seems so particularly profound and so uniquely shattering, and whether there is anything that we could do now, while still in the midst of disaster, to begin the process of social and moral repair? I will begin by considering the trauma of isolation with unknown time-horizons, and argue that it not only (...)
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  34.  5
    Masks in Medicine: Metaphors and Morality.Lindsey Grubbs & Gail Geller - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):103-107.
    We have never been so aware of masks. They were in short supply in the early days of COVID-19, resulting in significant risk to health care workers. Now they are highly politicized with battles about mask-wearing protocols breaking out in public. Although masks have obtained a new urgency and ubiquity in the context of COVID-19, people have thought about both the literal and metaphorical role of masks in medicine for generations. In this paper, we discuss three such metaphors—the masks of (...)
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  35.  11
    The Ethic of Responsibility: Max Weber’s Verstehen and Shared Decision-Making in Patient-Centred Care.Ariane Hanemaayer - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):179-193.
    Whereas evidence-based medicine encourages the translation of medical research into decision-making through clinical practice guidelines, patient-centred care aims to integrate patient values through shared decision-making. In order to successfully integrate EBM and PCC, I propose a method of orienting physician decision-making to overcome the different obligations set out by a formally-rational EBM and substantively-rational ethics of care. I engage with Weber’s concepts “the ethic of responsibility” and verstehen as a new model of clinical reasoning that reformulates the relationship between medical (...)
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  36.  14
    Beside Oneself with Rage: The Doubled Self as Metaphor in a Narrative of Brain Injury with Emotional Dysregulation.Jorie Hofstra - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):131-146.
    People narrating the experience of dysregulated anger after a brain injury call upon metaphor in patterned ways to help them make sense of their situation. Here, I analyze the use of the metaphor of the doubled self in a personal narrative of brain injury, and I situate this metaphor in its cultural history by analyzing Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and The Incredible Hulk as landmark moments in its development. A pattern of thought reflecting Seneca’s philosophy on the incompatibility of (...)
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  37.  7
    The COVID Pandemic: Selected Work.Therese Jones & Kathleen Pachucki - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):1-1.
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  38.  7
    “A Sick Child is Always the Mother’s Property”: The Jane Austen Pediatric Trauma Management Protocol.Perri Klass - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):121-129.
    Two pediatric accidents in Jane Austen’s Persuasion and one in Margaret Oliphant’s The Doctor’s Family are examined from the point of view of trauma management with analysis of contributing risk factors, medical management, concerns of parents and bystanders, and course of recovery. Risk factors for injury are impulsivity, poor supervision, and parents who are unable to set limits. Medical attention is swift and competent, but no heroic measures are used; the management of the injuries, concussion with loss of consciousness and (...)
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  39.  4
    Planetary Health Humanities—Responding to COVID Times.Bradley Lewis - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):3-16.
    The coronavirus pandemic has shattered our world with increased morbidity, mortality, and personal/social sufferings. At the time of this writing, we are in a biomedical race for protective equipment, viral testing, and vaccine creation in an effort to respond to COVID threats. But what is the role of health humanities in these viral times? This article works though interdisciplinary connections between health humanities, the planetary health movement, and environmental humanities to conceptualize the emergence of “planetary health humanities.” The goal of (...)
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  40.  9
    When Harry Became Sally: Responding to the Transgender Moment by Ryan T Anderson: New York: Encounter Books, 2018.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):195-199.
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  41.  13
    COVID-19, Contagion, and Vaccine Optimism.Kelly McGuire - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):51-62.
    Steven Soderbergh’s Contagion positions the vaccine as the end point of the arc of ​pandemic, marking both the containment of an elusive virus and ​the resumption of a life not fundamentally different from ​before the disease outbreak. ​The film reinforces the ​assumption that a pandemic will awaken ​all of us to the urgency of vaccination​, persuading us to put aside our reservations and anxieties ​and the idea that compliance is the inevitable outcome of quarantine. This article explores how pro-vaccination cultural (...)
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  42.  6
    Movement as Method: Some Existential and Epistemological Reflections on Dance in the Health Humanities.Aimie Purser - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):165-178.
    The embodied creative practice of dance facilitates a particular kind of awareness or attunement which can inform both the therapeutic and the intellectual work of the Health Humanities. This paper therefore considers dance as a way of ‘doing’ Health Humanities in two interlinked ways: dance as a way of healing and dance as a way of knowing. In bringing together carnal and the creative dimensions of human experience, dance offers us a way of making sense of our place in the (...)
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  43.  6
    Love in the Time of COVID.Carl V. Tyler - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):117-117.
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  44.  5
    The Art of Death by Edwidge Dandicat, Minnesota: Graywolf Press, 2017.Belinda Waller-Peterson - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):205-207.
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  45.  8
    The Health Humanities and Camus’s the Plague, Edited by Woods Nash, Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 2019.Steven Wilson - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):115-116.
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  46.  6
    Placing the Blame: What If “They” REALLY Are Responsible?Zhou Xun & Sander Gilman - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):17-49.
    The new coronavirus pandemic, COVID-19, has resurrected a number of historical and sociological problems associated with naming and blaming collectives for the origin or transmission of infectious disease. The default example of the false accusation in 2020 has been the case of the charge of well poisoning against the Jews of Western Europe causing the pandemic of the Black Death during the fourteenth century. Equally apparent is the wide-spread accusation that Asians are collectively responsible for the spread of the present (...)
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  47.  16
    Sinophobic Epidemics in America: Historical Discontinuity in Disease-Related Yellow Peril Imaginaries of the Past and Present.Dennis Zhang - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):63-80.
    Modern scholarship has drawn hasty and numerous parallels between the Yellow Peril discourses of the 19th- and 20th-century plagues and the recent racialization of infectious disease in the 21st-century. While highlighting these similarities is politically useful against Sinophobic epidemic narratives, Michel Foucault argues that truly understanding the past’s continuity in the present requires a more rigorous genealogical approach. Employing this premise in a comparative analysis, this work demonstrates a critical discontinuity in the epidemic imaginary that framed the Chinese as pathogenic. (...)
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