61 found

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  1.  3
    Phenomenologically-Informed Cancer Care: An Entryway into the Art of Medicine.Casey Rentmeester, Mark Bake & Amy Riemer - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 2022 (3):443-453.
    There has been increased interest in what the philosophical subdiscipline of phenomenology can contribute to medical humanities due to its dual emphases on practicality and its attempt to understand the experience of others, thus positioning it as a potentially helpful conceptual toolkit to guide clinical care. Using various figures from the phenomenological tradition, most prominently Martin Heidegger and Martin Buber, the authors illuminate relevant philosophical concepts, employ them in various examples, and provide three principles revolving around empathy, communication, and listening (...)
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  2.  3
    What is Intergenerational Storytelling? Defining the Critical Issues for Aging Research in the Humanities.Andrea Charise, Celeste Pang & Kaamil Ali Khalfan - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):615-637.
    Intergenerational storytelling (IGS) has recently emerged as an arts- and humanities-focused approach to aging research. Despite growing appeal and applications, however, IGS methods, practices, and foundational concepts remain indistinct. In response to such heterogeneity, our objective was to comprehensively describe the state of IGS in aging research and assess the critical (e.g., conceptual, ethical, and social justice) issues raised by its current practice. Six databases (PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed, Scopus, AgeLine, and Sociological Abstracts) were searched using search terms relating to _age_, (...)
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  3.  1
    Review of Contemporary Physician-Authors: Exploring the Insights of Doctors Who Write, edited by Nathan Carlin, New York: Routledge, 2022. [REVIEW]Jack Coulehan - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):663-665.
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  4. Farber’s Reimagined Mad Pride: Strategies for Messianic Utopian Leadership.Joshua M. Hall - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):585–600.
    In this article, I explore Seth Farber’s critique in _The Spiritual Gift of Madness_ that the leaders of the Mad Pride movement are failing to realize his vision of the mad as spiritual vanguard of sociopolitical transformation. First, I show how, contra Farber’s polemic, several postmodern theorists are well suited for this leadership (especially the Argentinian post-Marxist philosopher Ernesto Laclau). Second, I reinterpret the first book by the Icarus Project, _Navigating the Space between Brilliance and Madness_, by reimagining its central (...)
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  5.  4
    Otherness, Cloning, and Morality in John Wyndham’s The Midwich Cuckoos (1957).Solveig Lena Hansen - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):547-560.
    The British writer John Wyndham (1903–1969) explored societal effects of surprising or mystical events. A paradigmatic example is _The Midwich Cuckoos_ (1957), which portrays identical-looking children born without sexual intercourse. I propose a reading strategy that focuses on the fictional spatial order and analyses how the construction of the children’s otherness interferes with the village’s demarcation. Furthermore, I interpret the mysterious pregnancies as a reference to basic embryo research in the 1950s – cloning. Finally, I scrutinize Wyndham’s negotiation of utilitarianism (...)
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  6.  1
    CNA Clinicals Day #3.Anneka Johnston - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):675-676.
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  7.  4
    Bright.Amelia Khoo - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):673-674.
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  8.  1
    Review of Imagining the End: Mourning and Ethical Life by Jonathan Lear. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. 2022 ISBN 978-0-674-27259-0. [REVIEW]Arthur Kleinman - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):667-669.
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  9.  2
    Evil animes and Honorable Ruptures: Reading Gabriel García Márquez’s Love in the Time of Cholera through a Public Health Humanities Lens.S. A. Larson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):533-545.
    Extent health humanities readings of Gabriel García Márquez’s _Love in the Time of Cholera_ have focused on the doctor-patient relationship, the physician-scientist as a model for aspiring practitioners, and how individuals relate to the novel’s health themes of death, disease, and disability. However, such medicine-focused readings neglect the population-level public health concerns of the novel as they relate to contagion, community, and quarantine. This paper contributes to the growing field of public health humanities by using a close reading method to (...)
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  10.  2
    Here, the light is always fading.Thomas Nguyen - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):671-672.
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  11.  2
    Neoliberal Misfits: Reconceptualizing Debility in the Critical Medical Humanities.Tobias Skiveren - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):601-613.
    In recent years, the concept of debility has gained a lot of attention. In critical theory and in the critical medical humanities, the concept has come to refer specifically to the general ill-health of ordinary lives under neoliberal capitalism; as such, it has triggered a surge of interest in large-scale affective assemblages that incapacitate multitudes of bodies. This article proposes _neoliberal misfit_ as a conceptual tool to remedy the dissolution of subjectivity in these discussions. Pushing back against Jasbir Puar specifically, (...)
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  12.  2
    What Matters Most? The Power of Kafka’s Metamorphosis to Advance Understandings of HIV Stigma and Inform Empathy in Medical Health Education.Courtenay Sprague - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):561-584.
    HIV stigma, a social-medical problem, continues to confound researchers and health professionals, while undermining outcomes. Empathy may reduce stigma; its absence may predict stigma. This research investigates: How does Kafka’s _Metamorphosis_ advance understandings of HIV stigma in medical health education? _Metamorphosis_ amplifies the sociological-relational mechanisms fostering HIV stigma. It offers a multi-disciplinary, responsive space for ethical, humanistic and clinical inquiry to meet: enabling students to consider how social structures shape health inequities, moral, social experience, and their professional identity within. _Metamorphosis_ (...)
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  13.  2
    Picturing the Institution of Social Death: Visual Rhetorics of Postwar Asylum Exposé Photography.Shuko Tamao - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):639-658.
    This paper examines how photography shaped the American public’s perception of psychiatric hospitals during the immediate post-WWII period. I will analyze photographs that appeared in popular exposé articles of that period and that used photography as a visual aid for disclosing the poor conditions of state hospitals, intending to promote reform efforts focused on turning antiquated asylums into modern hospitals. Existing scholarship has mentioned how these photographs had a significant influence on shaping the public’s view of asylum conditions. Through a (...)
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  14. Medical Storyworlds: Health, Illness, and Bodies in Russian and European Literature at the Turn of the Twentieth Century by Elena Fratto, New York: Columbia University Press, 2021.Adrian Wanner - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (4):659-661.
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  15.  7
    Informing the Debate around ADHD: Take Care of Zizi, directed by Karim El Shennawy, 2021.Khalid Ali & Mona El Shimi - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):513-516.
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  16.  4
    Translating COVID-19: From Contagion to Containment.Marta Arnaldi, Eivind Engebretsen & Charles Forsdick - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):387-404.
    This article tests the hypothesis that all pandemics are inherently translational. We argue that translation and translation theory can be fruitfully used to understand and manage epidemics, as they help us explore concepts of infectivity and immunity in terms of cultural and biological resistance. After examining the linkage between translation and coronavirus disease from three different yet interlinked perspectives—cultural, medical, and biocultural—we make a case for a translational medical humanities framework for tackling the multifactorial crisis brought about by the SARS-CoV-2 (...)
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  17.  2
    Correction to: Dwelling in Strangeness: Accounts of the Kingsley Hall Community, London (1965-1970), Established by R. D. Laing. [REVIEW]Adrian Chapman - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):525-525.
    A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10912-021-09685-3.
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  18.  9
    Measles, Media and Memory: Journalism’s Role in Framing Collective Memory of Disease.Elena Conis & Sarah Hoenicke - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):405-420.
    Language used to describe measles in the press has altered significantly over the last sixty years, a shift that reflects changing perceptions of the disease within the medical community as well as broader changes in public health discourse. California, one of the most populous U.S. states and seat of the 2015 measles outbreak originating at Disneyland, presents an opportunity for observing these changes. This article offers a longitudinal case study of five decades of measles news coverage by the Los Angeles (...)
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  19.  5
    Contagion, Quarantine and Constitutive Rhetoric: Embodiment, Identity and the “Potential Victim” of Infectious Disease.Julie Homchick Crowe - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):421-441.
    Through a rhetorical analysis of fragments of language used by United States public health experts, victims, and advocates during the early periods of polio, HIV and COVID-19, this project shows how constitutive rhetoric within infectious disease discourse articulates the subject position of potential victim for different publics. The author finds that the analyzed discourse simultaneously calls forth a negative identity that asks people to not become something and also asks for actions to prevent disease spread – and, in doing so, (...)
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  20.  3
    Correction to: Contagion, Quarantine and Constitutive Rhetoric: Embodiment, Identity and the “Potential Victim” of Infectious Disease.Julie Homchick Crowe - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):529-530.
  21.  2
    Abject Ontologies: Cancer and ‘Living On’.Nadine Ehlers & Shiloh Krupar - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):455-466.
    This paper examines cancer through the lens of abjection. While cancer can be understood as an abject lifeform, we explore what we name the abject ontologies created through both cancer detection technologies/practices and cancer treatment, specifically the drug combination Adriamycin and Cytoxan. We ask: what are the abject ontologies produced through living with and living on from cancer diagnosis and treatment? Our concern is to map how cancer undoes our supposedly stable categories inherited from modernist logic, challenges our very ideas (...)
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  22.  8
    Correction to: Metagnosis: Revelatory Narratives of Health and Identity by Danielle Spencer.Arthur W. Frank - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):527-527.
    A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10912-021-09698-y.
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  23.  5
    Eating in Theory by Annemarie Mol, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2021.Arthur W. Frank - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):509-511.
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  24.  2
    Explosion Principle.Anna Gotlib - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):517-518.
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  25.  5
    The First Death.Hannah M. Kuly & Nancy M. Denizard-Thompson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):521-522.
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  26.  6
    Heart Sounds.Emerson Lee - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):523-524.
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  27.  6
    How to Go Mad without Losing Your Mind: Madness and Black Radical Creativity: La Marr Jurelle Bruce (2021), Duke University Press, Durham, ISBN 9781478010876.Bradley E. Lewis - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):505-508.
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  28.  4
    Semantics.Ien Li - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):519-520.
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  29.  3
    Increase in Sharing of Stressful Situations by Medical Trainees through Drawing Comics.Theresa C. Maatman, Lana M. Minshew & Michael T. Braun - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):467-473.
    Introduction. Medical trainees fear disclosing psychological distress and rarely seek help. Social sharing of difficult experiences can reduce stress and burnout. Drawing comics is one way that has been used to help trainees express themselves. The authors explore reasons why some medical trainees chose to draw comics depicting stressful situations that they had never shared with anyone before. Methods. Trainees participated in a comic drawing session on stressors in medicine. Participants were asked if they had ever shared the drawn situation (...)
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  30.  3
    In-verse reflection: structured creative writing exercises to promote reflective learning in medical students.David McLean, Neville Chiavaroli, Charlotte Denniston & Martin Richardson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):493-504.
    Medical educators recognize the value of reflection for medical students and the role creative writing can play in fostering this. However, direct creative writing tasks can be challenging for many students, particularly those with limited experience in the arts and humanities. An alternative strategy is to utilize an indirect approach, engaging students with structured tasks that obliquely encourage reflection. This paper reports one such approach. We refer to this approach as in-verse reflection, playing on both the structure of the writing (...)
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  31.  13
    Disease Information Through Comics: A Graphic Option for Health Education.Josh Rakower & Ann Hallyburton - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (3):475-492.
    This paper presents a critical interpretive synthesis of research on the efficacy of comics in educating consumers on communicable diseases. Using this review methodology, the authors drew from empirical as well as non-empirical literature to develop a theoretical framework exploring the implications of comics’ combination of images and text to communicate this health promoting information. The authors examined selected works’ alignment with the four motivational components of Keller’s ARCS Model to evaluate research within the context of learner motivation. Findings of (...)
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  32.  7
    Correction to: Speculative Fiction and the Political Economy of Healthcare: Chang-Rae Lee’s On Such a Full Sea.Phillip Barrish - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):209-209.
    Due to an editing error, this article was initially published with an incorrect title. The correct title is reflected above. The original article has been corrected.
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  33.  4
    A Black and White History of Psychiatry in the United States.Jordan A. Conrad - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):247-266.
    Histories of psychiatry in the United States can shed light on current areas of need in mental health research and treatment. Often, however, these histories fail to represent accurately the distinct trajectories of psychiatric care among black and white populations, not only homogenizing the historical narrative but failing to account for current disparities in mental health care among these populations. The current paper explores two parallel histories of psychiatry in the United States and the way that these have come to (...)
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  34.  1
    Proposing Abolition Theory for Carceral Medical Education.Joseph David DiZoglio & Kate Telma - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):335-342.
    Medical schools, like all institutions, are conservative since they seek to maintain and expand on their accomplishments. Stakes are high in carceral medicine given the risks of replicating the inhumane social conditions that exist within prisons and allow prisons to exist. Given the increasing number of partnerships between state and municipal carceral systems with academic medical centers, medical schools must consider which guiding theory they will use to teach carceral medicine. The interdisciplinary theory of prison abolition is best fit for (...)
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  35.  8
    Do I Look at You with Love?: Reimagining the Story of Dementia by Mark Freeman, Leiden and Boston: Brill Sense, 2021.Arthur W. Frank - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):379-382.
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  36.  7
    American Ignorance and the Discourse of Manageability Concerning the Care and Presentation of Black Hair.Amir R. A. Jaima - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):283-302.
    A culturally cultivated ignorance with regard to the care and presentation of tightly-curled hair pervades American society. This ignorance masquerades as a discourse of manageability, which supports institutional prohibitions of historically Black American hairstyles. In other words, rather than acknowledging our knowledge deficits, we attribute the medical and aesthetic consequences of our ignorance to the hair itself. The insidious implication is that the display of tightly curled hair is not a matter of taste but indicative of a lack of self-care. (...)
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  37.  4
    Strange Blood. The Rise and Fall of Lamb Blood Transfusion in 19th Century Medicine and Beyond by Boel Berner, [Transcript]: Open Access, 2020.Ericka Johnson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):377-378.
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  38.  7
    Community Narrative as a Borderlands Praxis: Anzaldúa’s Mestiza Consciousness as Explored in Cortez’s Sexile.Guneet Kaur - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):319-333.
    I apply Gloria Anzaldúa’s “borderlands theory” to Jamie Cortez’s Sexile, an HIV/AIDS prevention publication created as a first-person narrative of the journey of queer, trans activist Adela Vasquez who fled to the US from Cuba in 1980. I argue that Sexile is a borderlands text and operationalizes Anzaldúa’s mestiza consciousness at various levels— ranging from the essence of the text and what its existence represents to the literary techniques used in the telling of Adela’s narrative. In the first half of (...)
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  39.  5
    Six-Letter Words.Hannah Kay - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):383-384.
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  40.  4
    Speaking with Frankenstein.Jayne Lewis & Johanna Shapiro - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):267-282.
    This collaborative essay experimentally applies the insights of Mary Shelley's 1818 gothic fantasy Frankenstein to clinical interactions between present-day physicians and the patients they, akin to Shelley's human protagonist, so often seem to bring to life. Because that process is frequently fraught with unspoken elements of ambivalence, disappointment, frustration, and failure, we find in Shelley's speculative fiction less a cautionary tale of overreach than a dynamic parable of the role that the unspoken, the invisible, and the unknown might play in (...)
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  41.  3
    Medical Technologies Past and Present: How History Helps to Understand the Digital Era.Vanessa Rampton, Maria Böhmer & Anita Winkler - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):343-364.
    This article explores the relationship between medicine’s history and its digital present through the lens of the physician-patient relationship. Today the rhetoric surrounding the introduction of new technologies into medicine tends to emphasize that technologies are disturbing relationships, and that the doctor-patient bond reflects a more ‘human’ era of medicine that should be preserved. Using historical studies of pre-modern and modern Western European medicine, this article shows that patient-physician relationships have always been shaped by material cultures. We discuss three activities (...)
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  42.  9
    Correction to: Medical Students’ Efforts to Integrate and/or Reclaim Authentic Identity: Insights from a Mask-Making Exercise.Johanna Shapiro, Julie Youm, Michelle Heare, Anju Hurria, Gabriella Miotto, Bao-Nhan Nguyen, Tan Nguyen, Kevin Simonson & Atur Turakhia - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):207-207.
    The authors would like to correct a misspelling in the name of one of the authors due to a typographical error. The name should read Atur Turakhia, not Artur Turakhia. This does not change the conclusions or interpretations presented.
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  43.  3
    From Maternal Impressions to Eugenics: Pregnancy and Inheritance in the Nineteenth-Century U.S.Karen Weingarten - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (2):303-317.
    This essay examines the theory of maternal impressions, the belief that a woman’s experiences or emotions during pregnancy could explain congenital disability or emotional/ behavior differences in her child and asks why this theory circulated as an explanation for disability seen at birth by both medical doctors and in literature for far longer than it did across the Atlantic. By presenting examples from nineteenth-century medical literature, popular fiction, maternal handbooks, and two canonical works of literature, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter (...)
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  44.  3
    Tragic Affirmation: Disability Beyond Optimism and Pessimism.Thomas Abrams & Brent Adkins - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):117-128.
    Tragedy is a founding theme in disability studies. Critical disability studies have, since their inception, argued that understandings of disability as tragedy obscure the political dimensions of disability and are a barrier facing disabled persons in society. In this paper, we propose an affirmative understanding of tragedy, employing the philosophical works of Nietzsche, Spinoza and Hasana Sharp. Tragedy is not, we argue, something to be opposed by disability politics; we can affirm life within it. To make our case, we look (...)
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  45.  2
    Voices from the Newspaper Club: Patient Life at a State Psychiatric Hospital.Emily Beckman, Elizabeth Nelson & Modupe Labode - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):179-195.
    The authors conducted a qualitative analysis of thirty-seven issues of The DDU Review, a newsletter produced by residents of the Dual Diagnosis Unit, a residential unit for people who had diagnoses of developmental disability and serious mental illness in the Central State Hospital. The analysis of the newsletters produced between September 1988 and June 1992 revealed three major themes: 1) the mundane; 2) good behavior; and 3) advocacy. Contrary to the authors’ expectations, the discourse of medicalization—such as relations with physicians, (...)
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  46.  5
    Pain Studies by Lisa Olstein, New York: Bellevue Literary Press, 2021.Jack Coulehan - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):201-203.
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  47.  6
    In/Fertile Monsters: The Emancipatory Significance of Representations of Women on Infertility Reality TV.Marjolein Lotte de Boer, Cristina Archetti & Kari Nyheim Solbraekke - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):11-26.
    Reality TV is immensely popular, and various shows in this media genre involve a storyline of infertility and infertility treatment. Feminists argue that normative and constructed realities about infertility and infertility treatment, like those in reality TV, are central to the emancipation of women. Such realities are able to steer viewers' perceptions of the world. This article examines the emancipatory significance of representations of women on 'infertility reality TV shows'. While the women in these shows all have 'abnormal' qualities, we (...)
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  48.  1
    The Therapeutic Approach to Military Culture: A Music Therapist’s Perspective.Nicole Drozd - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):169-177.
    Culture can broadly be defined as “the values, norms, and assumptions that guide human action”. In contrast with the broader civilian society, the experiences and environments within the military community create a unique cultural subset. The United States armed forces are unified by their primary mission to provide external defense, security, and protection, and each branch shares a unique core set of values and norms. Because this culture is so complex and unique, it can sometimes be a challenge for many (...)
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  49.  13
    Narrative Humility and Parasite, directed by Bong Joon Ho, 2019.Yoshiko Iwai - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):197-199.
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  50.  3
    Saadat Hasan Manto, Partition, and Mental Illness through the Lens of Toba Tek Singh.Tahir Jokinen & Shershah Assadullah - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):89-94.
    “Toba Tek Singh,” which describes the exchange of mental asylum inmates between India and Pakistan in the wake of partition, was perhaps Saadat Hasan Manto’s most well-known short story. Manto’s work was coloured by his experience of mental illness, including alcohol addiction and possible depressive disorder. This essay attempts to use “Toba Tek Singh” as a lens through which to shine an integrative light on the role of mental illness in Manto’s work and life, by discussing his personal experiences, themes (...)
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  51.  3
    Saadat Hasan Manto, Partition, and Mental Illness through the Lens of Toba Tek Singh.Tahir Jokinen & Shershah Assadullah - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):89-94.
    “Toba Tek Singh,” which describes the exchange of mental asylum inmates between India and Pakistan in the wake of partition, was perhaps Saadat Hasan Manto’s most well-known short story. Manto’s work was coloured by his experience of mental illness, including alcohol addiction and possible depressive disorder. This essay attempts to use “Toba Tek Singh” as a lens through which to shine an integrative light on the role of mental illness in Manto’s work and life, by discussing his personal experiences, themes (...)
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  52.  2
    Saadat Hasan Manto, Partition, and Mental Illness through the Lens of Toba Tek Singh.Tahir Jokinen & Shershah Assadullah - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):89-94.
    “Toba Tek Singh,” which describes the exchange of mental asylum inmates between India and Pakistan in the wake of partition, was perhaps Saadat Hasan Manto’s most well-known short story. Manto’s work was coloured by his experience of mental illness, including alcohol addiction and possible depressive disorder. This essay attempts to use “Toba Tek Singh” as a lens through which to shine an integrative light on the role of mental illness in Manto’s work and life, by discussing his personal experiences, themes (...)
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  53.  8
    Dirty Bread, Forced Feeding, and Tea Parties: the Uses and Abuses of Food in Nineteenth-Century Insane Asylums.Madeline Bourque Kearin - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):95-116.
    Nineteenth-century psychiatrists ascribed to a model of health that was predicated on the existence of objective and strictly defined laws of nature. The allegedly “natural” rules governing the production of consumption of food, however, were structured by a set of distinctively bourgeois moral values that demonized over-indulgence and intemperance, encouraged self-discipline and productivity, and treated gentility as an index of social worth. Accordingly, the asylum acted not only as a therapeutic instrument but also as a moral machine that was designed (...)
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  54.  2
    Authorship in the Medical Humanities: Breaking Cross-field Boundaries or Maintaining Disciplinary Divides?Róisín King, Jana Al-Khabouri, Brendan Kelly & Desmond O’Neill - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):65-71.
    PurposeMedical humanities is a field which implies collaborative work across disciplines although the degree to which this actually occurs is unknown. Our purpose was to determine the degree of joint work in medical humanities through analysis of authorship and acknowledgements in the two main medical humanities journals.MethodsObservational survey of authorship. We studied authorship data in all papers published in the two major general medical humanities journals between 2009 and 2018.ResultsTwo-thirds of papers had single authors, of whom a majority declared a (...)
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  55.  2
    How Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy Does the Body, or Why Epistemology Alone Cannot Explain this Controversial Breast Cancer Treatment.Kelly Pender & Brooke Covington - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):141-158.
    Since the late 1990s, the use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy to treat unilateral breast cancer has been on the rise. Over the past two decades, dozens of studies have been conducted in order to understand this trend, which has puzzled and frustrated physicians who find it at odds with efforts to curb the surgical overtreatment of breast cancer, as well as with evidence-based medicine, which has established that the procedure has little oncologic benefit for most patients. Based on the work (...)
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  56.  10
    ‘The Good Doctor’: the Making and Unmaking of the Physician Self in Contemporary South Africa.Michelle Pentecost & Thomas Cousins - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):43-54.
    In this article we examine the figure of the doctor in animated debates around public sector medicine in contemporary South Africa. The loss of health professionals from the South African public system is a key contributor to the present healthcare crisis. South African medical schools have revised curricula to engage trainee doctors with a broader set of social concerns, but the disjunctures between training, health systems failures, and a high disease burden call into question whether junior doctors are adequately prepared (...)
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  57.  13
    Passing Strategies and Performative Identities: Coping with (In)Visible Chronic Diseases.Tanisha Jemma Rose Spratt - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):73-88.
    In this article I consider the role of passing and performance in the everyday lives of alkaptonuria and vitiligo patients. Race, LGBTQ, gender and disability scholars have long used the term passing to describe sub-groups of people within marginal populations who intentionally manipulate their bodies or alter their behaviour in order to claim identities that are not socially assigned to them at birth. In this paper I demonstrate the effectiveness of the passing strategies that patients use in order to mitigate (...)
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  58.  1
    The Production of Space in Richard Selzer’s Wartime Story “The Whistlers’ Room”.Jiena Sun - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):3-9.
    This essay applies Henri Lefebvre’s notion of the production of space, particularly his conceptualization of the tension formed by the perceived-conceived-lived triad to analyze how space is produced in wartime hospitals as demonstrated in Richard Selzer’s “The Whistlers’ Room.” Wounded soldiers participate in producing the triad of the social space of military hospitals through their multilayered performances as fighting soldiers serving the nation and as living human beings longing for human connections. Contradictory performances demonstrate the strategic positioning of wounded soldiers (...)
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  59.  4
    Graphic Medicine and the Critique of Contemporary U.S. Healthcare.Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Chinmay Murali - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):27-42.
    Comics has always had a critical engagement with socio-political and cultural issues and hence evolved into a medium with a subversive power to challenge the status quo. Staying true to the criticality of the medium, graphic medicine critiques the exploitative and unethical practices in the field of healthcare, thereby creating a critical consciousness in the reader. In close reading select graphic pathographies such as Gabby Schulz's Sick, Emily Steinberg's Broken Eggs, Ellen Forney's Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo & Me and Marisa (...)
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  60.  4
    Constructing the Gendered Risk of Illness in Lyrica Ads for Fibromyalgia: Fear of Isolation as a Motivating Narrative for Consumer Demand.Tabetha K. Violet - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):55-64.
    Direct-to-consumer television advertisements for Lyrica in the United States create narratives of gendered domestic normalcy to which women with fibromyalgia are encouraged to aspire through pharmaceutical intervention. This paper unpacks images and narratives within these advertisements to demonstrate that they rely on metaphors that represent gendered expectations in order to evoke guilt and provoke a desire for what Joseph Dumit calls “health as risk reduction,” and what I argue is an attempt to show disability being erased. Following Stuart Hall’s Encoding/Decoding (...)
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  61.  3
    Ailing Hearts and Troubled Minds: An Historical and Narratological Study on Illness Narratives by Physicians with Cardiac Disease.Jonatan Wistrand - 2022 - Journal of Medical Humanities 43 (1):129-139.
    A number of studies show that when doctors become ill, there is often ambiguity in the division of roles and responsibilities in the medical encounter. Yet little is known about how the dilemma of the sick doctor has changed over time. This article explores the experience of illness among physicians by applying an historical, narratological approach to three doctor’s narratives about personal cases of cardiac disease: Max Pinner’s from the 1940s, Robert Seaver’s from the 1980s, and John Mulligan’s from 2015. (...)
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