Year:

  1.  2
    “Services Not Mausoleums”: Race, Politics, and the Concept of Community in American Medicine.Zoe M. Adams & Naomi Rogers - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):515-529.
    A romance with the concept of community has long characterized activist healthcare movements and has more recently been taken up by academic medical centers as a sign of virtuous civic engagement. During the late 1960s, the word community, as deployed by administrators at prestigious AMCs, became increasingly politicized, commodified and racialized. Here, we analyze how the concept of community was initially framed in the 1963 Community Mental Health Centers Act, the first legislation to establish community mental health centers in America. (...)
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  2.  6
    Impact of Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) on the Analysis of Clinical Images: A Pre-Post Study of VTS in First-Year Medical Students.Gauri G. Agarwal, Meaghan McNulty, Katerina M. Santiago, Hope Torrents & Alberto J. Caban-Martinez - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):561-572.
    To assess the effectiveness of Visual Thinking Strategies in medical education curricula, a pretest–posttest experimental study design was used to evaluate the impact of participating in VTS workshops on first-year medical students. A total of forty-one intervention and sixty comparative students completed the study which included the analysis of clinical images followed by a measurement of word count, length of time analyzing images, and quality of written observations of clinical images. VTS training increased the total number of words used to (...)
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  3.  2
    The Old Man.Wesley Hauwei Chou - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):615-616.
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  4.  1
    The Next Pandemic: Supporting COVID-19 Frontline Doctors Through Film Discussion.Cristelle Chow, Raveen Shahdadpuri, Kam Kai-Qian & Chan Yoke Hwee - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):585-595.
    This paper describes an innovative just-in-time health humanities programme to educate and provide support to COVID-19 frontline doctors-in-training. The programme incorporates small-group screening of the Netflix documentary, The Next Pandemic from the Explained series, followed by a one-hour facilitated discussion to explore themes surrounding the current pandemic and its impact on frontline doctors in a tertiary paediatric hospital in Singapore. Themes derived from the film included preparedness, blame, and the impact on healthcare workers and public, which were further discussed to (...)
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  5.  2
    Requiring the Healer’s Art Curriculum to Promote Professional Identity Formation Among Medical Students.Elizabeth C. Lawrence, Martha L. Carvour, Christopher Camarata, Evangeline Andarsio & Michael W. Rabow - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):531-541.
    The Healer's Art curriculum is one of the best-known educational strategies to support medical student professional identity formation. HART has been widely used as an elective curriculum. We evaluated students’ experience with HART when the curriculum was required. All one hundred eleven members of the class of 2019 University of New Mexico School of Medicine students were required to enroll in HART. We surveyed the students before and after the course to assess its self-reported impact on key elements of professional (...)
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  6.  4
    On an Organ Donation Run.Joey Lew - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):611-612.
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  7.  2
    Responding to Racism in the Clinical Setting: A Novel Use of Forum Theatre in Social Medicine Education.Joel Manzi, Sharon Casapulla, Katherine Kropf, Brandi Baker, Merri Biechler, Tiandra Finch, Alyssa Gerth & Christina Randolph - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):489-500.
    Issues of race have traditionally been addressed in medical school curricula in a didactic manner. However, medical school curricula often lack adequate opportunity for the application of learning material relating to race and culture. When confronted with acts of racism in clinical settings, students are left unprepared to respond appropriately and effectively. Forum Theatre offers a dynamic platform by which participants are empowered to actively engage with and become part of the performance. When used in an educational context, Forum Theatre (...)
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  8.  7
    Who’s Your Enemy?: Incorporating Stories of Trauma into a Medical Humanities Course.Lynda Payne - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):481-487.
    This article discusses the theoretical and practical experiment of creating, promoting and co-teaching a medical humanities course: Medicine, War and the Arts at a School of Medicine in the United States from the viewpoint of the students who took the class. Specifically, it analyses how three themes emerged in students’ responses to the oral, literary and visual stories of war and trauma in the course and how they revealed the subjective and ambivalent nature of all medical encounters with patients. The (...)
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  9. Before 1999.Sally Peach - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):609-610.
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  10.  3
    A Novel Graphic Medicine Curriculum for Resident Physicians: Boosting Empathy and Communication through Comics.Lara K. Ronan & M. K. Czerwiec - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):573-578.
    Curricular design that addresses residency physician competencies in communication skills and professionalism remains a challenge. Graphic Medicine uses comics, a medium combining text and images, to communicate healthcare concepts. Narrative Medicine, in undergraduate medical education, has limited reported usage in Graduate Medical Education. Given the time constraints and intensity of GME, we hypothesized that comics as a form of narrative medicine would be an efficient medium to engage residents.The authors created a novel curriculum to promote effective communication and professionalism, focusing (...)
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  11.  4
    The Psychiatrist as the Repressor of the Extraordinary in Glass, Directed by M. Night Shyamalan, 2019.Anna Sheen, Katherine Chung, Nashali Ferrara & Douglas Opler - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):579-584.
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  12.  4
    “The Spirit Thickened”: Making the Case for Dance in the Medical Humanities.Nina Shevzov-Zebrun, Elizabeth Barchi & Katie Grogan - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):543-560.
    In comparison to other art forms, dance remains underrepresented in the medical humanities, especially within the academic medical setting. Several factors, including perceived lack of applicability to patient care, contribute to this pattern. This paper contends that, to the contrary, learners across the medical education spectrum stand to gain much from engaging with the movement arts, including improvement of clinically-relevant skills such as physical self-awareness, observation, communication, and mindfulness. This paper makes the case for the nascent subdiscipline of Movement and (...)
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  13.  1
    Centering Patients, Revealing Structures: The Health Humanities Portrait Approach.Sandy Sufian, Michael Blackie, Joanna Michel & Rebecca Garden - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):459-479.
    This paper introduces an innovative curricular approach—the Health Humanities Portrait Approach —and its pedagogical tool—the Health Humanities Portrait. Both enable health professions learners to examine pressing social issues that shape, and are shaped by, experiences of health and illness. The Portrait Approach is grounded in a set of “critical portraiture” principles that foster humanities-driven analytical skills. The HHP’s architecture is distinctively framed around a pressing social theme and utilizes a first-person narrative and scholarship to explore how the dimensions of the (...)
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  14.  2
    Twelve Tips for Starting a Collaboration with an Art Museum.Ray Williams & Corinne Zimmermann - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):597-601.
    In recent years, collaboration between medical educators and art museum educators has emerged as an important trend. The museum environment can support a kind of professional reflection and conversation that is difficult to develop in a medical setting. Skills such as close looking, empathic communication, resilience, and cultural awareness may also be developed in the art museum when plans for the visit are developed with attention to their relevance to health professions. Working across disciplines requires identifying and cultivating a strong (...)
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  15.  4
    A Look Back and a Path Forward: Poetry's Healing Power during the Pandemic.David Haosen Xiang & Alisha Moon Yi - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):603-608.
    This discussion seeks to highlight the ability of poetry to combat loneliness, a growing public health problem with significant negative health outcomes that potentially impact millions of Americans. We argue that poetry can play a very relevant role and have an impact in medicine. Through a brief literature review of previous studies on poetry in medicine, we demonstrate that poetry can not only combat loneliness but can also play important roles in helping patients, physicians, and other healthcare professionals/providers. Because of (...)
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  16.  2
    Before Chemotherapy.Ellen Zhang - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):613-613.
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  17.  5
    Slicing through Thin Layers of Humanity: Narratives of the Abject.Robin Kanak Zwier - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):501-513.
    This essay examines narratives about cadaver dissection through the lens of psychoanalytic theory in order to better understand the nature of medical students’ socialization into medicine and its implications for physician-patient communication. The theoretical framework provided by Julia Kristeva focuses attention on the nature of subject-formation in relation to abjection – that which reveals the contingent nature of the speaking self. Analysis of memoirs and other narratives by medical students demonstrates that students encounter the abject in the process of dissecting (...)
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  18.  4
    The Cultural Politics of ‘Implementation Science’.Richard Boulton, Jane Sandall & Nick Sevdalis - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):379-394.
    Despite the growing profile of ‘implementation science’, its status as a field of study remains ambiguous. Implementation science originates in the evidence-based movement and attempts to broaden the scope of evidence-based medicine to improve ‘clinical effectiveness’ and close the ‘implementation gap’. To achieve this agenda, implementation science draws on methodologies from the social sciences to emphasise coherence between qualitative and quantitative approaches. In so doing, we ask if this is at the expense of ignoring the dominating tendencies of the evidence-based (...)
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  19.  4
    Awkward Choreographies From Cancer's Margins: Incommensurabilities of Biographical and Biomedical Knowledge in Sexual and/or Gender Minority Cancer Patients’ Treatment.Mary K. Bryson, Evan T. Taylor, Lorna Boschman, Tae L. Hart, Jacqueline Gahagan, Genevieve Rail & Janice Ristock - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):341-361.
    Canadian and American population-based research concerning sexual and/or gender minority populations provides evidence of persistent breast and gynecologic cancer-related health disparities and knowledge divides. The Cancer's Margins research investigates the complex intersections of sexual and/or gender marginality and incommensurabilities and improvisation in engagements with biographical and biomedical cancer knowledge. The study examines how sexuality and gender are intersectionally constitutive of complex biopolitical mappings of cancer health knowledge that shape knowledge access and its mobilization in health and treatment decision-making. Interviews were (...)
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  20.  6
    Bearding, Balding and Infertile: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and Nationalist Discourse in India.Shruti Buddhavarapu - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):411-427.
    This paper investigates the gendered and racialized discourse on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in India. A complex metabolic, endocrinal and reproductive disorder, PCOS is one of the most common endocrinopathies in women of reproductive age today. Due to an unclear etiology, there is no single clinical definition for PCOS, contributing to a sense of confusion around the syndrome. India has one of the highest rates of PCOS in the world. Medical and social discourses on PCOS suggest the high rates are due (...)
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  21.  4
    The Thin Man is His Clothing: Dressing Masculine to be Masculine.Stephen Buetow - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):429-437.
    Body image research focuses almost exclusively on women or overweight and obesity or both. Yet, body image concerns among thin men are common and can result, at least in part, from mixed messages in society around how men qua men should dress and behave in order to look good and feel good. Stand-alone interventions to meet these different messages tend to provide men with little therapeutic relief. This conceptual paper draws on literature from the medical humanities; gender and body image (...)
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  22.  1
    Old Man Country. My Search for Meaning Among the Elders by Thomas R. Cole, New York: Oxford University Press, 2019.Jack Coulehan - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):445-447.
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  23. A Momentary Backlash of Mimesis in an Intensive Care Unit: Ân (The Moment), written/directed by Özen Yula, 2016.Burç İdem Dinçel - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):439-444.
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  24.  8
    Living Dis/Artfully with and in Illness.Patty Douglas, Carla Rice & Areej Siddiqui - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):395-410.
    This article experiments with multimedia storytelling to re-vision difference outside biomedical and humanistic frames by generating new understandings of living dis/artfully with illness. We present and analyze seven short videos created by women and trans people living with illness as part of an arts-based research project that aimed to speak back to hegemonic concepts of disability that create barriers to healthcare.1 We call for a welcoming in of disability studies’ disruptive and re-imaginative orientations to bodily difference to unsettle medicine’s humanistic (...)
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  25.  7
    Refugee.Anna Gotlib - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):449-450.
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  26.  19
    Reading, Trauma and Literary Caregiving 1914-1918: Helen Mary Gaskell and the War Library.Sara Haslam - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):305-321.
    This article is about the relationship between reading, trauma and responsive literary caregiving in Britain during the First World War. Its analysis of two little-known documents describing the history of the War Library, begun by Helen Mary Gaskell in 1914, exposes a gap in the scholarship of war-time reading; generates a new narrative of "how," "when," and "why" books went to war; and foregrounds gender in its analysis of the historiography. The Library of Congress's T. W. Koch discovered Gaskell's ground-breaking (...)
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  27.  19
    Embodiment and Entangled Subjectivity: A Study of Robin Cook’s Coma, Priscille Sibley’s The Promise of Stardust and Alexander Beliaev’s Professor Dowell’s Head.Manali Karmakar & Avishek Parui - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):289-304.
    The essay examines Robin Cook’s Coma and Priscille Sibley’s The Promise of Stardust that dramatize the reified and disposable status of the brain-dead patients who are classified as nonpersons. The essay argues that the man-machine entanglement as depicted in the novels constructs a deterritorialized and entangled form of subjectivity that intervenes in the dominant biomedical understanding of personhood and agency that we notionally associate with a conscious mind. The essay concludes its arguments by discussing Alexander Beliaev’s Professor Dowell’s Head which (...)
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  28.  3
    Disequilibrium.Timothy S. H. Kwok - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):451-451.
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  29.  6
    A Medical Sublime.Bradley Lewis - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):265-287.
    Inspired by a passage from Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, this article considers the possibility of a “medical sublime.” It works through a history of the sublime in theory and in the arts, from ancient times to the present. It articulates therapeutic dimensions of the sublime and gives contemporary examples of its medical relevance. In addition, it develops the concept of sublime-based stress-reduction workshops and programs. These workshops bring the sublime out of the library and the museum into the lives of (...)
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  30.  9
    “I Know a Guy Who Once Heard…”: Contemporary Legends and Narratives in Healthcare.John Minser & Tyler Gibb - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):323-340.
    Contemporary legends – also called urban legends – are common throughout our society. Distinct from mere rumors passed around social media, anecdotes of pseudoscientific discoveries, or medical misinformation, contemporary legends are important because, rather than merely transmitting false ideas or information about medicine, they model distinct and primarily antagonistic patterns of interaction between patients and providers via their narrative components. And, while legends that patients tell about their distrust for doctors are fairly well-studied, less attention has been paid to the (...)
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  31.  5
    Prayer to a Parasite.Elana R. Osen - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):453-456.
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  32.  32
    More Things in Heaven and Earth: Spirit Possession, Mental Disorder, and Intentionality.Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (3):363-378.
    Spirit possession is a common phenomenon around the world in which a non-corporeal agent is involved with a human host. This manifests in a range of maladies or in displacement of the host's agency and identity. Prompted by engagement with the phenomenon in Egypt, this paper draws connections between spirit possession, and the concepts of personhood and intentionality. It employs these concepts to articulate spirit possession, while also developing the intentional stance as formulated by Daniel Dennett. It argues for an (...)
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  33.  7
    Desegregation and the retreat of clinical psychoanalysis.Christopher Chamberlin - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):243-257.
    This article examines the racial politics that reshaped psychoanalytic psychotherapy and ushered in a community mental health paradigm during the U.S. Civil Rights Era. Policymakers in the 1960s adopted the language of social justice to condemn psychoanalysis for its inability to treat psychotics and its unwillingness to treat black patients; yet the community psychiatry model of treatment that replaced it compounded the denial of the black subject’s clinical needs. Challenging the extant historiography that appraises psychoanalysis as a victim of neoliberalism (...)
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  34.  8
    “May all Be Shattered into God”: Mary Barnes and Her Journey through Madness in Kingsley Hall.Adrian Chapman - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):207-228.
    Contributing to renewed scholarly interest in R. D. Laing and his circle, and in the radical therapeutic community of Kingsley Hall, London, this article offers the first article-length reading of Mary Barnes’ and Joseph Berke’s Mary Barnes: Two Accounts of a Journey through Madness. This text offers views of anti-psychiatry ‘on the ground’ that critique the 1960s utopianism of Laing’s championing of madness as a metanoic, quasi-psychedelic voyage. Barnes’ story, too, reveals tensions within the anti-psychiatric movement. Moving beyond existing criticism (...)
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  35.  6
    The Voices That Accompany Me.Arthur W. Frank - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):171-178.
    This essay begins with a metaphor describing who enters the field of humanities in medicine and healthcare and the types of work they do. The role of witness is discussed, underscoring tensions between witnessing and analyzing. The essay then turns to my own background as an example of how each professional in this field brings something distinct. I briefly describe the three basic principles of my work with narrative: the injunction to keep the stories in the foreground, the work of (...)
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  36.  8
    From Girlhood to Motherhood: Rituals of Childbirth and Obstetrical Medicine Re-Examined Through John Milton.Ashleigh Frayne - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):179-192.
    This article considers how seventeenth-century writer John Milton engages in modes of thinking that register the obstetric revolution occurring during the period. During a time when physicians were gaining entry to the birthing room, a medical rhetoric of childbirth was developing that cast childbirth in new pathological terms. Milton's A Masque Presented at Ludlow Castle demonstrates how childbirth was influenced by emerging obstetrical language and practice, as well as the ways in which a writer might question such influence. Finally, this (...)
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  37.  19
    Mono-Causal and Multi-Causal Theories of Disease: How to Think Virally and Socially About the Aetiology of AIDS.Katherine Furman - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):107-121.
    In this paper, I utilise the tools of analytic philosophy to amalgamate mono-causal and multi-causal theories of disease. My aim is to better integrate viral and socio-economic explanations of AIDS in particular, and to consider how the perceived divide between mono-causal and multi-causal theories played a role in the tragedy of AIDS denialism in South Africa in the early 2000s. Currently, there is conceptual ambiguity surrounding the relationship between mono-causal and multi-causal theories in biomedicine and epidemiology. Mono-causal theories focus on (...)
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  38.  11
    Nick in Time.Matthew Lee - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):261-261.
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  39.  2
    Suturing the Nation in South Korean Historical Television Medical Dramas.Kai Khiun Liew - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):193-205.
    Using the 2000-2010 South Korean historical medical dramas Heo Jun, Dae Jang Geum, and Jejoongwon as case studies, this article examines televisual reimaginations of Korean medical modernity as interpretative popular culture texts. Particularly in the areas of the anatomical sciences and surgery, modern medicine’s emancipatory potentials in these productions are set semi-fictitiously in pre-modern Joseon historical contexts. Dramaturgically challenging entrenched social hierarchies and ossified cultural taboos of Institutionalized Confucianism, these dramas’ progressive physician-protagonists emphasize the universality and impartiality of medical knowledge (...)
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  40. Suturing the Nation in South Korean Historical Television Medical Dramas.Kai Khiun Liew - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):193-205.
    Using the 2000-2010 South Korean historical medical dramas Heo Jun, Dae Jang Geum, and Jejoongwon as case studies, this article examines televisual reimaginations of Korean medical modernity as interpretative popular culture texts. Particularly in the areas of the anatomical sciences and surgery, modern medicine’s emancipatory potentials in these productions are set semi-fictitiously in pre-modern Joseon historical contexts. Dramaturgically challenging entrenched social hierarchies and ossified cultural taboos of Institutionalized Confucianism, these dramas’ progressive physician-protagonists emphasize the universality and impartiality of medical knowledge (...)
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  41. Suturing the Nation in South Korean Historical Television Medical Dramas.Kai Khiun Liew - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):193-205.
    Using the 2000-2010 South Korean historical medical dramas Heo Jun, Dae Jang Geum, and Jejoongwon as case studies, this article examines televisual reimaginations of Korean medical modernity as interpretative popular culture texts. Particularly in the areas of the anatomical sciences and surgery, modern medicine’s emancipatory potentials in these productions are set semi-fictitiously in pre-modern Joseon historical contexts. Dramaturgically challenging entrenched social hierarchies and ossified cultural taboos of Institutionalized Confucianism, these dramas’ progressive physician-protagonists emphasize the universality and impartiality of medical knowledge (...)
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  42.  14
    HIV Stigma, Gay Identity, and Caste ‘Untouchability’: Metaphors of Abjection in My Brother…Nikhil, The Boyfriend, and “Gandu Bagicha”.Shamira A. Meghani - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):137-151.
    In this article I read textual metaphors of ‘untouchability’ in ‘post-AIDS’ representation as an erasure of structures that condition HIV stigmatization in India. Throughout, my discussion is contextualised by the political economy of HIV and AIDS, which has been productive of particular modern sexual subjects. In the film My Brother…Nikhil, the stigmatization of Nikhil, a gay Indian man living with HIV, is constituted through visual and verbal caste metaphors, which draw on existing subject positions that are elided as ‘traditional’, residual, (...)
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  43. HIV and AIDS in Irish Theatre: Queer Masculinities, Punishment, and ‘Post-AIDS’ Culture.Cormac O’Brien - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):123-136.
    This essay provides a critical survey of key Irish theatre productions that present queer men with HIV or AIDS as a central theme while also seeking to situate several of these productions within the controversial discourse of ‘post-AIDS’ as it plays out in Irish cultural and social discourses. Through this survey, this essay finds and critically elaborates how a discourse of AIDS as punishment is a common denominator in all of these plays; whether that be as a central metaphor in (...)
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  44.  2
    Introduction: Framing ‘Post-AIDS’ and Global Health Discourses in 2015 and Beyond.Gráinne O’Connell - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):89-94.
    This special issue, entitled “Post-AIDS’ and Global Health Discourses: Interdisciplinary Perspectives,’ emerged from a one day Medical Humanities symposium at the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities, at the University of Leeds, England, on February 27th 2015. This special issue focusses on the perceived deprioritising of HIV and AIDS in the Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, that were launched in 2015. The SDGs function as policy benchmarks for all entities within the United Nations system and they supersede the Millennium Development Goals, (...)
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  45.  4
    “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar”: Undead Bodies and Medical Technology.Sarah O’Dell - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):229-242.
    This paper examines the relationship between medical technology and liminal states of “undeath” as presented in “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” and the real-life case of Jahi McMath, who was maintained on life support for over four years following a diagnosis of brain death. Through this juxtaposition, “Valdemar” comes to function as a modern fable, an uneasy herald of medical technology’s potential to create liminal states between life and death. The ability to transgress these boundaries bears a (...)
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  46.  1
    A Paper Man.Yusuf Patrick - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):259-260.
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  47.  3
    Temporal Dissonance: South African Historians and the ‘Post-AIDS’ Dilemma.Carla Tsampiras - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):153-169.
    While foregrounding the historiography of HIV and AIDS in the South African context, this article analyses AIDS as simultaneously existing in three spheres: first, virtually – as the subject matter of electronically measurable research; second, academically – as a topic of research in the discipline of History; and third, actually – as a complex health concern and signifier that, via the field of Medical and Health Humanities, could allow for new collaborations between historians and others interested in understanding AIDS. Throughout, (...)
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  48. Problematising the Discourse of ‘Post-AIDS’.Liz Walker - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):95-105.
    This paper reflects on the meanings of ‘post-AIDS’ in the Global North and South. I bring together contemporary arguments to suggest that the notion of ‘post-AIDS’ is, at best, misplaced, not least because its starting point remains a biotechnical one. Drawing on aspects of the sub-Saharan African experience, this essay suggests that, despite significant shifts in access to antiretroviral therapy, HIV continues to be fundamentally shaped by economic determinants and social and cultural practices. In this essay, I question the certainty (...)
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  49.  3
    Sundown for JC.James M. Wilkins - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):263-263.
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  50.  6
    Contemporary Artists’ Books and the Intimate Aesthetics of Illness.Stella Bolaki - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):21-39.
    This essay brings together critical perspectives from the discrete traditions of artists’ books and the medical humanities to examine artists’ books by three contemporary artists – Penny Alexander, Martha A. Hall and Amanda Watson-Will – that treat experiences of illness and wellbeing. Through its focus on a multimodal and multisensory art form that has allegiances with, but is not reduced to, narrative, the essay adds to recent calls to rethink key assumptions of illness narrative study and to challenge utilitarian approaches. (...)
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  51.  6
    Traces of the Invisible: How an Alternative Reading of The Sleeping Beauty Fashioned a Bookwork Heightening Awareness of the Role of the Anesthetist.Julie Brixey-Williams - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):41-51.
    This article discusses a Leverhulme residency undertaken by the author Julie Brixey-Williams in 2003–4 at the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. Notions of medical visibility were explored through practice-led investigations under the umbrella title, Traces of the Invisible, that concentrated on making concrete, visible responses to the hidden or intangible elements of the anesthetist’s working life in areas such as sleep, breath, pain and genetic markers. Rosebud is a unique nine-foot concertina bookwork created after reading the entire (...)
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  52.  5
    In the Absence of Running: From Injury and Medical Intervention to Art.Véronique Chance - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):65-80.
    In recent years, I have developed an endurance running art-practice as part of a larger inquiry into the performative nature of human physical activity. In the Absence of Running is series of artworks made using images from medical arthroscopic interventions following the diagnosis of medial meniscus tears to the cartilage and osteoarthritis in both my knees. Faced with not being able to run or to make artworks using running in the long-term, I turned to the tools of medical intervention. If (...)
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  53.  4
    On Photographing Artists’ Books.Egidija Čiricaitė - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):81-83.
    Artists’ books are challenging to photograph. They function as a unit of tightly conceptually-bound visual, textual and material elements in addition to a heightened self-awareness of the work's booksness. Binding, size, weight, and shape of the book, translucency, texture, thickness of paper, placement of images and/or text on the page or off the page interact with other graphic elements; they control, and direct the reader towards the expressive components of meaning which arise from pace, haptic experience, and visual or structural (...)
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  54.  3
    Reflections on Digestions and Other Corporealities in Artists’ Books.Amanda Couch - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):7-19.
    With an avid attention to the valuing of embodiment and a championing of the re-emergence of the body as site for discussions of knowledge and knowing, this essay shares aspects of my practice that engage a performative, haptic, situated engagement with the body through the artist’s book. The motivation for the creation of my bookworks was an interest in manifesting situated knowing and embodied ways of becoming. Engaging form, materiality, and bodily history, my artists’ books explore the processes and metaphors (...)
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  55.  4
    Bound to Speak: Accounts of Illness in Artists’ Books.Johanna Drucker - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):85-88.
    This paper addresses the role played by artists’ books in illness and recovery.
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  56.  5
    Unruly Voices: Artists’ Books and Humanities Archives in Health Professions Education.Jennifer S. Tuttle & Cathleen Miller - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):53-64.
    Martha A. Hall’s artists’ books documenting her experience of living with breast cancer offer future health professionals a unique opportunity to sit in the patient’s position of vulnerability and fear. Hall’s books have become a cornerstone of our medical humanities pedagogy at the Maine Women Writers Collection because of their emotional directness and their impact on readers. This essay examines the ways that Hall’s call for conversation with healthcare providers is enacted at the University of New England and provides a (...)
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  57.  2
    Pharmaceutical Advertising and the Subtle Subversion of Patient Autonomy.Casey Rentmeester - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities (Online First):1-10.
    Direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising is pervasive in the United States. Beyond its effect on consumer behavior, DTCPA changes the relationship between individuals and physicians. The author provides a brief history of pharmaceutical advertising in the United States. The author then analyzes the current commonly used marketing techniques of pharmaceutical companies and argues that pharmaceutical companies are “irrational authorities” in Erich Fromm’s sense of the term since they seek to exploit persons. Using concepts from various philosophers from the Continental tradition, with a (...)
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