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  1.  3
    Review of Challenging Choices: Canada’s Population Control in the 1970s. [REVIEW]Vincent Auffrey - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):132-134.
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  2.  1
    Review of Environmental Expertise. Connecting Science, Policy, and Society. [REVIEW]Elodie Charrière - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):129-131.
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  3.  3
    Reinventing Expertise in the History of Psychiatry and Eugenics.Erika Dyck - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):107-112.
    This reflection piece considers how expertise has been generated within the history of madness, disability, eugenics, psychiatry and anti-psychiatry. As numerous scholars and critics have pointed out, the power of rational argumentation can be persuasive, while its absence can be pathologized. Yet, in the fields of madness studies and critical disability studies we can see many examples of how the dividing line between normal and pathological states have been contested, especially where those categories correspond with notions of expertise, experience, and (...)
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  4.  5
    Mistrust in Numbers.Gil Eyal - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):36-46.
    This paper characterizes the crisis of expertise, especially as it manifested during the covid-19 pandemic, as a crisis of trust in regulatory science. The temporal structure of the facts produced by regulatory science differs from Kuhnian “normal science,” while they also contain profound distributional implications. As a result, they suffer from a set of congenital problems that provoke mistrust in a way that normal science facts do not. While “expertise” is often offered as an answer to these problems, the paper (...)
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  5.  5
    Between Pedantry and Populism.Axel Gelfert - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):113-122.
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  6.  3
    Experts, Managerialism, and Democratic Theory.Mott Greene - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):1-21.
    The revolt against expertise is a novel aspect of a larger and longer-standing discontent with the power of managerial elites within modern democracies. In the United States, scientific expertise is contested adversarially on the model of a public trial. In broadcast media, expert disagreement proceeds via staged debates with opposing sides arguing scientific questions bearing on public policy. By the mid-20th century many observers agreed that this broadcast format had transformed the active ‘public’ – the target audience of these debates (...)
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  7.  2
    Front Matter.Daniel Halverson - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1).
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  8.  8
    Expertise, a Framework for Our Most Characteristic Asset and Most Basic Inequality.Cliff Hooker, Claire Hooker & Giles Hooker - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):27-35.
    This essay provides a framework of concepts and principles suitable for systematic discussion of issues surrounding expertise. Expertise creates inequality. Its multiple benefits and the creativity of technology lead to a society replete with expertises. The basic binds of expertise derive from the desire of non-experts to be able to both enjoy what expertise offers and insure that it is exercised in the social interest. This involves trusting the exercise of expertise, involuntarily or voluntarily. A healthy society provides various means (...)
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  9.  6
    The Two Virtues of Science.Stephen John - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):47-53.
    During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was disagreement over whether the science supported facemask mandates. This paper interrogates debates over this question, paying particular attention to an ambiguity between two scientific virtues: epistemic caution and epistemic responsiveness. I suggest that there is an argument from each virtue to reasons to trust scientists’ claims in policy debate. However, as the case of facemask debates illustrates, it is not clear that scientists can possess both virtues simultaneously: the two virtues are in tension. After (...)
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  10.  2
    Review of Hearing Happiness: Deafness Cures in History. [REVIEW]Bethany Johnson - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):125-128.
  11.  2
    Review of Deep Time Reckoning: How Future Thinking Can Help Earth Now. [REVIEW]Lissette Lorenz - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):135-137.
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  12.  4
    Space-Time and Utopia.Brittany Myburgh - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):54-62.
    Throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, artists and scholars have pursued connections between modern art movements and scientific exploration and expertise. Particularly in discussions of Cubism and Futurism, artists and historians have employed the terms ‘fourth dimension’, ‘simultaneity’, and ‘space-time’ in their artistic theories. Select scholars have connected the use of these terms with Albert Einstein’s theories of relativity. This paper presents brief notes on this perceived intersection between Western science and art during the early to mid-twentieth century. It focuses (...)
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  13.  1
    How (Not) to Build an Expert.Robert Naylor - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):98-106.
    The social contributors to the formation of expertise are often a taboo subject when practitioner communities interact with outsiders, making the exploration of these inputs a difficult endeavour. When exploring scientific communities, one resource that many STS and HSTM scholars can draw from is their personal experience as students of science – experts in waiting. I will draw on my personal experience as a physics student at a Russel Group university from 2014 to 2018, with a year abroad at a (...)
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  14.  4
    Review of The Information Manifold: Why Computers Can't Solve Algorithmic Bias and Fake News. [REVIEW]Jeff Pooley - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):138-139.
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  15.  3
    Philosophizing Together.Rashad Rehman - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):88-97.
    Philosophers have various responsibilities. Articulating these responsibilities, however, is contingent on what one means by “philosophy” and what philosophers have “expertise” in. Responsible philosophers must therefore interact with the following kinds of questions: What do philosophers have expertise in? What responsibilities do philosophers have as intellectual experts, and to whom are they responsible? What are philosophers supposed to know and be able to publicly convey? What is the role of a philosopher in contributing to local, institutional, and global responsibilities? This (...)
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  16.  17
    Handservant of Technocracy.Christian Ross - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):63-87.
    The place of scientific expertise in democracy has become increasingly disputed, raising question who ought to have a say in decision-making about science and technology, with what authority, and for what reasons. Public engagement has become a common refrain in technoscientific discussions to address tensions in the rightful roles of experts and the public in democratic decision-making. However, precisely what public engagement entails, who it involves, how it is performed, and to what extent it is desirable for democratic societies remain (...)
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  17.  2
    The Best Popular Science.Gregory Schrempp - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):22-26.
    Strategies of persuasion tapped in popular science writing are discussed under the assumption that effective science education and communication can offer antidotes to the revolt against expertise. It is argued that popular science can weaken the experience of science even while attempting to enhance it. Topics discussed include gimmickry, efforts at science-art fusions, and other contemporary mythologizing moves as well as the relationship between science and the humanities generally. Steven Weinberg’s modern classic The First Three Minutes is explored as an (...)
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  18.  1
    Review of Strange Trips: Science, Culture, and the Regulation of Drugs. [REVIEW]Sergio Sismondo - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):123-124.
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  19.  2
    Review of Why Trust Science? [REVIEW]Christopher Stephens - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):140-144.
  20.  3
    Review of Expertise: An Introduction. [REVIEW]Joseph van Weelden - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):145-148.
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