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  1.  6
    Bioethics and witnessing.Debora Diniz - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):295-295.
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  2.  13
    Editors' statement on the responsible use of generative artificial intelligence technologies in scholarly journal publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):296-299.
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  3.  11
    Addressing exploitation and inequities in open science: A relational perspective.Cornelius Ewuoso, Luís Cordeiro-Rodrigues, Ambroise Wonkam & Jantina de Vries - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):331-343.
    There are concerns that participation in open science will lead to various forms of exploitation – of researchers and scholars in low‐income countries and under‐resourced institutions. This article defends a contrary thesis and demonstrates the exact ways the underexplored notions of communal relationships, human dignity and social justice – and the normative principles to which they give rise – grounded in African philosophy can usefully address critical concerns regarding exploitation in the sharing of research resources to facilitate open partnership/collaboration and (...)
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  4.  13
    Addressing exploitation and inequities in open science: A relational perspective.Cornelius Ewuoso, Luís Cordeiro-Rodrigues, Ambroise Wonkam & Jantina Vries - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):331-343.
    There are concerns that participation in open science will lead to various forms of exploitation – of researchers and scholars in low-income countries and under-resourced institutions. This article defends a contrary thesis and demonstrates the exact ways the underexplored notions of communal relationships, human dignity and social justice – and the normative principles to which they give rise – grounded in African philosophy can usefully address critical concerns regarding exploitation in the sharing of research resources to facilitate open partnership/collaboration and (...)
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  5.  17
    Addressing exploitation and inequities in open science: A relational perspective.Cornelius Ewuoso, Luís Cordeiro-Rodrigues, Ambroise Wonkam & Jantina Vries - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):331-343.
    There are concerns that participation in open science will lead to various forms of exploitation – of researchers and scholars in low-income countries and under-resourced institutions. This article defends a contrary thesis and demonstrates the exact ways the underexplored notions of communal relationships, human dignity and social justice – and the normative principles to which they give rise – grounded in African philosophy can usefully address critical concerns regarding exploitation in the sharing of research resources to facilitate open partnership/collaboration and (...)
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  6.  9
    Power and respect in global health research collaboration: Perspectives from research partners in the United States and the Dominican Republic.Corrinne Green, Jodi Scharf, Ana Jiménez-Bautista & Mina Halpern - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):367-376.
    Research partnerships between institutions in the Global North and institutions in the Global South have many potential benefits, including sharing of knowledge and resources. However, such partnerships are traditionally exploitative to varying degrees. In order to promote equity in South‐North research partnerships, it is necessary to learn from the experiences of researchers collaborating internationally. This study analyzed transcripts from eleven semi‐structured qualitative interviews with researchers working at Clínica de Familia La Romana, an institution in the Dominican Republic with decades of (...)
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  7.  12
    The use and ethical assessment of medical photos taken by physicians.Seyhan Demir Karabulut - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):312-320.
    With the increased use of technology, the use of medical photography has also increased, especially for secondary purposes. Secondary use only results in a benefit for clinicians and is considered a one-way process. This, in turn, raises several potential ethical issues, despite the numerous benefits of medical photography. The descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 82 physicians who took medical photos, in Ankara, Turkey. The mean age of the participants was 44.7 years. Of the participants, 95.1% reported using their personal (...)
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  8.  6
    Evolving capacity of children and their best interests in the context of health research in South Africa: An ethico‐legal position.Melodie Labuschaigne, Safia Mahomed & Ames Dhai - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):358-366.
    The existing ethico-legal regulation of adolescent children's participation in health research in South Africa is currently unclear. The article interrogates the existing framework governing children's consent to research participation, with specific emphasis on discrepancies in consent norms in law and ethical guidelines. Against the backdrop of the constitutional directive that requires that a child's best interests are of paramount importance in every matter concerning the child, the article assesses whether sufficient consideration is given to children's evolving maturity and capacities when (...)
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  9.  7
    A proposal for an international Code of Conduct for data sharing in genomics.Amal Matar, Mats Hansson, Santa Slokenberga, Adam Panagiotopoulos, Gauthier Chassang, Olga Tzortzatou, Kärt Pormeister, Elias Uhlin, Antonella Cardone & Michael Beauvais - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):344-357.
    As genomic research becomes commonplace across the world, there is an increased need to coordinate practices among researchers, especially with regard to data sharing. One such way is an international code of conduct. In September 2020, an expert panel consisting of representatives from various fields convened to discuss a draft proposal formed via a synthesis of existing professional codes and other recommendations. This article presents an overview and analysis of the main issues related to international genomic research that were discussed (...)
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  10.  8
    Ethical considerations in using a smartphone‐based GPS app to understand linkages between mobility patterns and health outcomes: The example of HIV risk among mobile youth in rural South Africa.Thulile Mathenjwa, Busi Nkosi, Hae-Young Kim, Luchuo Engelbert Bain, Frank Tanser & Douglas Wassenaar - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):321-330.
    Smartphones with Global Positioning System (GPS) apps offer simple and accurate tools to collect data on human mobility. However, their associated ethical challenges remain to be assessed. We used the Emanuel framework to assess the ethical concerns of using smartphone GPS to record mobility patterns of young adults in rural South Africa for a larger study on mobility and HIV risk (Sesikhona). We conducted four focus groups (FGDs) with individuals eligible for the Sesikhona study. FGD data were coded using the (...)
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  11.  4
    Reasons for and insights about HPV vaccination refusal among ultra‐Orthodox Jewish mothers.Rivka Zach & Miriam Ethel Bentwich - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):300-311.
    BackgroundVaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) is a pivotal tool for preventing a significant cause of cervical cancer. One particular culturally recognized context associated with negative attitudes toward the HPV vaccine is the religiousness of parents. However, relatively speaking, there remains a scarcity of studies that have focused specifically on religious groups, especially non-Christian groups. PurposeTo better understand the basis for members of an ultra-Orthodox Jewish community to object to the HPV vaccine and how such objections can and cannot be reduced, (...)
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  12.  4
    From extreme poverty to vulnerability in COVID‐19 vaccine priority.Federico Germán Abal - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):201-202.
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  13.  16
    Organ transplantation in Nepal: Ethical, legal, and practical issues.Alok Atreya, Manish Upreti, Ritesh George Menezes, Ambika Dawadi & Nuwadatta Subedi - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):285-292.
    In Nepal, live donor organ transplantation is only 14 years old with the first successful kidney transplant made in 2008 and a successful liver and bone marrow transplant made in 2016. However, transplantation of cadaveric cornea dates back to 1998. There are still no cases of animal-to-human organ transplantation in Nepal. There are stringent laws to regulate human body organ transplantation in Nepal which are amended from time to time. However, there is a racket of human traffickers who lure rural (...)
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  14.  6
    Ethical analysis of cadaver supply and usage processes for research within the scope of the Helsinki Declaration.Banu Buruk & Güneş Aytaç - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):211-219.
    Recent technological developments have considerably transformed the supply, storage, and transportation processes of cadavers, creating new and previously unforeseen ethical challenges regarding cadaver usage. In this study, we analyzed two aspects of the cadaver processing system—cadaver supply and its use in research. Thereafter, we highlighted the major ethical concerns underlying these stages and correlated our search results with the ethical principles outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki (DoH), or Helsinki Declaration. To ensure the reliability and continuity of medical progress, human—especially (...)
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  15.  6
    What the ‘greater good’ excludes: Patients left behind by pre‐operative COVID‐19 screening in an Ethiopian town.Georgina D. Campelia, Hilkiah K. Suga, John H. Kempen, James N. Kirkpatrick & Nancy S. Jecker - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):269-276.
    During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic, bioethical analyses often emphasized population health and societal benefit. Hospital policies frequently focused on reducing risk of transmitting SARS‐CoV‐2 by restricting visitors; requiring protective equipment; and screening staff, patients and visitors. While restrictions can be burdensome, they are often justified as essential measures to protect the whole population against a virus with high rates of transmission, morbidity and mortality. Yet communities are not monolithic, and the impacts of these restrictions affect different groups differently. (...)
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  16.  1
    The Letter as an accessible forum for developing world bioethics trainees.Timothy Daly - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):205-206.
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  17.  6
    An ethics of anthropology‐informed community engagement with COVID‐19 clinical trials in Africa.Sarah J. L. Edwards, Blessing Silaigwana, Danny Asogun, Julius Mugwagwa, Francine Ntoumi, Rashid Ansumana, Kevin Bardosh & Jennyfer Ambe - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):242-251.
    The COVID‐19 pandemic has reinforced the critical role of ethics and community engagement in designing and conducting clinical research during infectious disease outbreaks where no vaccine or treatment already exists. In reviewing current practices across Africa, we distinguish between three distinct roles for community engagement in clinical research that are often conflated: 1) the importance of community engagement for identifying and honouring cultural sensitivities; 2) the importance of recognising the socio‐political context in which the research is proposed; and 3) the (...)
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  18.  4
    Regulation concerns of supply and demand sides for aesthetic medicine from Chinese perspective.Longfei Feng & Xiaomei Zhai - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):277-284.
    Aesthetic medicine has become a booming industry in the world. However, there are widespread social and health risks posed by aesthetic medicine, including illegal practice, and misleading information from aesthetic medicine institutes. Social media and advertisement play important roles in leading to appearance anxiety among young people nowadays. Regarding the chaotic situation in the aesthetic medical field, there is a fact that the practice of aesthetic medicine has been marginally regulated, even in some developed countries. China has the largest population (...)
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  19.  10
    An unethical trial and the politicization of the COVID‐19 pandemic in Brazil: The case of Prevent Senior.Fernando Hellmann & Núria Homedes - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):229-241.
    The Brazilian Federal Senate created a Parliamentary Inquiry Commission (CPI) to investigate the Bolsonaro government's irregularities in the management of the COVID-19 pandemic. One of the cases that drew attention was the research conducted by Prevent Senior, a private health insurance company, on the early treatment of COVID-19. The article analyzes the scientific validity of the research and the ethical problems related to its implementation. It is based on analysis of Prevent Senior's report of the clinical study, the Brazilian and (...)
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  20.  7
    Supporting African thought with Migrant Indigenous Knowledge on dead human bodies research.Jan Gresil Kahambing - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):207-208.
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  21.  7
    Ethical obligation and legal requirements: On informed consent practices in Bangladesh.Sonia Mannan, Jobair Alam, K. M. Ashbarul Bari, S. M. A. A. Mamun & Rehnuma Mehzabin Orin - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):252-259.
    Informed consent to medical intervention is fundamental in both ethics and law. But in practice it is often not taken seriously in developing countries. This paper provides an appraisal of informed consent practices in Bangladesh. Following a review of the ethical and legal principles of informed consent, it assesses the degree to which doctors adhere to it in Bangladesh. Based on findings of non-compliance, it then investigates the reasons for such non-compliance through an appraisal of informed consent practices in Bangladesh (...)
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  22.  7
    “By only considering the end product it means that our participation has always been in vain”: Defining benefits in HIV vaccine trials in Tanzania.Godwin Pancras, Mangi Ezekiel, David Nderitu, Bege Dauda & Erasto Vitus Mbugi - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):220-228.
    Debates about what constitutes benefits in human research continue to be less informed due to a lack of empirical evidence from the developing world. This study aimed to explore what constitutes benefits in HIV vaccine trials in Tanzania and examine inherent ethical implications. A qualitative case study design was deployed and a total of 29 purposively selected study participants comprising of experienced researchers, institutional review board members and community advisory board members were included. Collected data were analyzed by thematic analysis (...)
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  23.  9
    When medical professionalism and culture or the law collide: Gay patients in homophobic societies.Udo Schuklenk - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):199-200.
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  24.  6
    Autonomy and paternalism in shared decision‐making in a Saudi Arabian tertiary hospital: A cross‐sectional study.Yousef Y. Alabdullah, Esra Alzaid, Safa Alsaad, Turki Alamri, Saleh W. Alolayan, Suliman Bah & Abdullah S. Aljoudi - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):260-268.
    Medical paternalism has long been a common medical practice. However, patient autonomy in healthcare has been recently adopted by doctors and patients alike. This study explored whether doctors and patients in a tertiary care hospital in Saudi Arabia preferred autonomy or paternalism in shared decision‐making. A total of 118 participants (51 patients requiring total knee replacement, owing to stages 3–4 of osteoarthritis, and 67 doctors) from the Eastern province, Saudi Arabia. responded to a 17‐question category‐based questionnaire involving four scales of (...)
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  25.  2
    Conceptual and empirical reflection provide more arguments for the centrality of extreme poverty in COVID‐19 vaccination: A reply to Abal and Zeledón‐Ramírez et al.Carlos Augusto Yabar - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):209-210.
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  26.  1
    Combining state‐led distribution with a parallel market‐based distribution to improve COVID‐19 vaccine distribution.Manuel Zeledón-Ramírez, Timothy Daly & Luis García-Valiña - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (3):203-204.
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  27.  6
    Reproductive Justice: Inequalities in the Global South.Ilana Ambrogi & Gabriela Arguedas-Ramírez - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):91-92.
  28.  8
    Reflections on research ethics in a public health emergency: Experiences of Brazilian women affected by Zika.Ilana Ambrogi, Luciana Brito & Sergio Rego - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):138-146.
    In Brazil, the epicenter of the Zika crisis, brown, black, and indigenous poor women living in municipalities with scarce resources were disproportionally affected. The gendered consequences of the epidemic exposed how intersectional lenses are central to understand the impact of public health emergencies in the lives of women and girls. The demand for Zika-affected children and women to be research participants is relevant for an ethical analysis of participant protection procedures during a crisis. We investigated how women experienced research participation (...)
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  29.  5
    Whose autonomy, whose interests? A donor‐focused analysis of surrogacy and egg donation from the global South.Aireen Grace Andal - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):99-108.
    This article provides a donor-focused analysis of how transnational reproductive donation intersects with issues central to bodily autonomy of surrogates and egg donors from the global South. Little is known about the autonomy of surrogates and egg donors, especially among those from the global South. This article addresses this gap by examining two key issues on surrogacy and egg donation—conflict of interest and recruitment market. With these issues, this paper presents contexts of the reproductive body as a space of contestation (...)
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  30.  38
    Reproductive justice: Non‐interference or non‐domination?Himani Bhakuni - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):93-98.
    The reproductive justice movement started by black women’s rights activists made its way into the academic literature as an intersectional approach to women’s reproductive autonomy. While there are many scholars who now employ the term ‘reproductive justice’ in their research, few have taken up the task of explaining what ‘justice’ entails in reproductive justice. In this paper I take up part of this work and attempt to clarify the relevant kind of freedom an adequate theory of reproductive justice would postulate. (...)
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  31.  7
    Illegal abortion and reproductive injustice in the Pacific Islands: A qualitative analysis of court data.Kate Burry, Kristen Beek, Lisa Vallely, Heather Worth & Bridget Haire - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):166-175.
    The Oceania region is home to some of the world's most restrictive abortion laws, and there is evidence of Pacific Island women's reproductive oppression across several aspects of their reproductive lives, including in relation to contraceptive decision-making, birthing, and fertility. In this paper we analyse documents from court cases in the Pacific Islands regarding the illegal procurement of abortion. We undertook inductive thematic analysis of documents from eighteen illegal abortion court cases from Pacific Island countries.Using the lens of reproductive justice, (...)
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  32.  12
    Illegal abortion and reproductive injustice in the Pacific Islands: A qualitative analysis of court data.Kate Burry, Kristen Beek, Lisa Vallely, Heather Worth & Bridget Haire - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):166-175.
    The Oceania region is home to some of the world's most restrictive abortion laws, and there is evidence of Pacific Island women's reproductive oppression across several aspects of their reproductive lives, including in relation to contraceptive decision‐making, birthing, and fertility. In this paper we analyse documents from court cases in the Pacific Islands regarding the illegal procurement of abortion. We undertook inductive thematic analysis of documents from eighteen illegal abortion court cases from Pacific Island countries.Using the lens of reproductive justice, (...)
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  33.  8
    Primary care and abortion legislation in Chile: A failed point of entry.Lidia Casas, Lieta Vivaldi, Adela Montero, Natalia Bozo, Juan José Álvarez & Jorge Babul - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):154-165.
    While Chile's partial decriminalization of abortion in 2017 was a long overdue recognition of women's sexual and reproductive rights, nearly four years later the caseload remains well below expectations. This pattern is the product of standing barriers in access to abortion‐related health services, especially at the primary care point of entry. This study seeks to identify and describe these barriers. The findings presented here were obtained through a qualitative, exploratory study based on 19 semi‐structured interviews with relevant actors identified through (...)
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  34.  32
    Assisted reproduction technologies and reproductive justice in the production of parenthood and origin: Uses and meanings of the co‐produced gestation and the surrogacy in Brazil.Aureliano Lopes da Silva Junior, Mônica Fortuna Pontes & Anna Paula Uziel - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):122-137.
    This article examines the construction of parenthood, drawing on Brazilian cisgender, heterosexual, and homosexual couples' experiences in using assisted reproduction technologies (ART), particularly the surrogacy. For that purpose, we interviewed: 1) a lesbian woman who had her daughter through her partner's pregnancy, using ART with anonymous donor semen; 2) a gay man who, together with his partner, used a surrogacy service under contract via a specialised offshore agency; 3) a woman who was a surrogate, in Brazil, for her sister-in-law and (...)
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  35.  2
    Deliberate delays in offering abortion to pregnant women with fetal anomalies after 24 weeks' gestation at a centre in South Africa.Anita Kleinsmidt, Malebo Malope & Michael Urban - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):109-121.
    South Africa has an abortion law which codifies the broad themes of reproductive rights set out in the Constitution of South Africa, other laws and national guidelines. Certain wording of the conditions in the Choice Act for abortion after 20 weeks' gestation, are open to interpretation, being ‘severe malformation of the fetus’ and ‘risk of injury to the fetus’. From 24 weeks onwards, abortion is carried out by feticide/induced fetal cardiac asystole (‘IFCA’) and subsequent induction of labour in South Africa. (...)
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  36.  21
    Anti‐abortion strategizing and the afterlife of the Geneva Consensus Declaration.Lynn Morgan - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):185-195.
    The Geneva Consensus Declaration, introduced by the Trump-Pence administration in 2020 and signed by thirty-two countries, claims that there is no international right to abortion. Although the Declaration was subsequently repudiated by the Biden administration, it did not die. This paper traces the afterlife of the Geneva Consensus Declaration as part of an ongoing antiabortion strategy to form a global coalition. Its supporters hope to mobilize signing nations to remove sexual and reproductive rights from the agendas of multilateral agencies including (...)
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  37.  15
    Bottom‐up advocacy strategies to abortion access during the COVID‐19 pandemic: Lessons learned towards reproductive justice in Brazil.Helena Borges Martins da Silva Paro, Renata Rodrigues Catani, Rafaela Cordeiro Freire & Gabriela Rondon - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):147-153.
    In Brazil, abortion is only allowed in cases of rape, serious risk to a woman's life or fetal anecephaly. Legal abortion services cover less than 4% of the Brazilian territory and only 1,800 procedures are performed, in average, per year. During the COVID‐19 pandemic, almost half of the already few Brazilian abortion clinics shut down and women had to travel even longer distances, reaching abortion services at later gestational ages. In this paper, we describe three bottom‐up advocacy strategies that emerged (...)
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  38.  18
    Obstetric violence as immigration injustice: A view from the United States and Colombia.Allison B. Wolf - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (2):176-184.
    In September 2020, Project South, along with numerous other organizations, released a report detailing abuses in a Georgia Detention Center – including forced hysterectomies. Whatever other factors are at play, one of them is an intrinsic connection between obstetric violence against pregnant migrants and immigration injustice. It is not incidental that these acts – in US detention centers, along the US‐Mexico border, in Colombian hospitals and clinics – are being perpetrated on immigrant bodies. And it is not accidental or random (...)
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  39.  11
    What can be learned from the Global South on abortion and how we can learn?Debora Diniz & Giselle Carino - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (1):3-4.
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