Studies in Philosophy and Education

ISSNs: 0039-3746, 1573-191X

13 found

View year:

  1.  16
    What “Vigilantly Vulnerable Informed Humility” Offers: Review of White Educators Negotiating Complicity (by Barbara Applebaum, 2022). [REVIEW]Elizabeth A. Self - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (3):325-328.
  2.  24
    Negotiating White Complicity through Vigilantly Vulnerable Informed Humility: Response to Self.Barbara Applebaum - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (3):329-335.
  3.  13
    The Genesis of Aesthetic Sensitivity in Carolina de Jesus: Challenges for Educators.Erika Natacha Fernandes de Andrade, Marcus Vinicius da Cunha & Tatiana Cristina Santana Viruez - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (3):289-304.
    Brazilian writer Carolina Maria de Jesus (1914–1977) was born in a rural community and spent most of her life in a slum. Despite this, her literary work achieved remarkable editorial success, having its value recognized by critics and academic circles. This paper analyzes Carolina Maria de Jesus’s autobiographical narratives in the light of John Dewey’s aesthetic theory, with the purpose of investigating the factors responsible for the development of her aesthetic sensitivity – intellectual and emotional dispositions favorable to involvement with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  14
    The Importance of Contrary Forces in Education: On the Notion of Conflict in Tagore’s Religion of Man.Jan G. Pouwels - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (3):243-268.
    Dealing with conflicts seems to be a great challenge in society today. But not only in society. Higher education displays an air of resoluteness with certainty and security that disguises the conflicts and the fear of conflicts in a substantial number of subjects. If not in a state of denial, higher education avoids taking up conflicts over issues, for learning. The detailed investigation of Tagore’s pedagogical writings, with a focus on the importance of conflicts in education, reveals a genuine embrace (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  24
    Dialogue, Horizon and Chronotope: Using Bakhtin’s and Gadamer’s Ideas to Frame Online Teaching and Learning.Peter Rule - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (3):305-323.
    The information explosion and digital modes of learning often combine to inform the quest for the best ways of transforming information in digital form for pedagogical purposes. This quest has become more urgent and pervasive with the ‘turn’ to online learning in the context of COVID-19. This can result in linear, asynchronous, transmission-based modes of teaching and learning which commodify, package and deliver knowledge for individual ‘customers’. The primary concerns in such models are often technical and economic – technology as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  10
    Subjectivity as the Purpose of Education and Teaching.Arik Segev - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (3):269-287.
    In his book “World-Centred Education,” Biesta discusses two themes fundamental for the emergence of subjectivity as a desirable existential humane state of being and for an education that aims to achieve it. The first theme is about freedom and the importance of distancing education and teaching from any act of objectifying students. The second theme concerns the world, its limitations on freedom, and its central role in educational events, which aim to help students fulfill their subjectivity. However, when he analyzes (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  12
    Rethinking Humanism and Education Through Sloterdijk’s Rules for the Human Zoo.Jeong-Gil Woo - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (3):223-241.
    This study examines the challenges of humanism and education in the 21st century as addressed by the German philosopher Peter Sloterdijk in his Elmau Speech (1999). In this lecture, titled _Rules for the Human Zoo_, Sloterdijk argues that the traditional notion of humanism, specifically “humanism as a literary society,” has reached its conclusion, necessitating the development of a new humanism appropriate for the contemporary era. However, the new concept of humanism emerging from what Sloterdijk terms the “anthropotechnic turn” appears to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  21
    On Why ‘Trust’ Constitutes an Appropriate Synonym for ‘Certainty’ in Wittgenstein’s Sense: What Pupils Can Learn from Its Staging.José María Ariso - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (2):163-176.
    In this paper I outline the most relevant traits of the term ‘trust’ understood as one of the synonyms for ‘certainty’ that Ludwig Wittgenstein used in his posthumous work On Certainty. To this end, I analyze the paragraphs of On Certainty in which reference is made to pupils who are expected to trust what is taught by their teacher: in addition, I note that such a process is largely based on the attitude of rejection and bewilderment that teachers promote towards (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  13
    Correction: Humanities on Demand and the Demands on the Humanities: Between Technological and Lived Time.Paul Atkinson & Tim Flanagan - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (2):161-161.
  10.  23
    Humanities on Demand and the Demands on the Humanities: Between Technological and Lived Time.Paul Atkinson & Tim Flanagan - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (2):143-160.
    The digital humanities have developed in concert with online systems that increase the accessibility and speed of learning. Whereas previously students were immersed in the fluidity of campus life, they have become suspended and drawn-into various streams and currents of digital pedagogy, which articulate new forms of epistemological movement, often operating at speeds outside the lived time and rhythm of human thought. When assessing learning technologies, we have to consider the degree to which they complement the rhythms immanent to human (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  17
    Transhumanism, Society and Education: An Edusemiotic Approach.Susana Gómez Redondo, Claudio J. Rodríguez Higuera, Juan R. Coca & Alin Olteanu - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (2):177-193.
    We propose a semiotic framework to underpin a posthumanist philosophy of education, as contrasted to technological determinism. A recent approach to educational processes as semiotic phenomena lends itself as a philosophy to understand the current interplay between education and technology. This view is aligned with the transhumanist movement to defend techno-scientific progress as fundamental to human development. Particularly, we adopt a semiotic approach to education to tackle certain tensions in current debates on the human. Transhumanism scholars share the optimistic belief (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  11
    Left Populism and the Education of Desire.Callum McGregor - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (1):73-90.
    This paper mobilises the psychoanalytic concepts of desire and enjoyment to better understand how processes of education aimed at extending and defending democratic life might respond to and engage with populist politics. I approach this task by engaging with a particular vector of Mouffe and Laclau’s political philosophy, moving from a critique of liberal democracy’s rationalist pretensions to their insistence that left populism and its passionate construction of a ‘people’ is the central task facing radical politics. This attention to the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  13
    Ceasing to be Hammers: Descriptive Inquiry as Collective Meditation.Rachel Wahl - 2024 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (1):117-119.
 Previous issues
  
Next issues