16 found

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  1.  1
    ‘Smash the Patriarchy’: The Changing Meanings and Work of ‘Patriarchy’ Online.Kim Allen & Rosemary Lucy Hill - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (2):165-189.
    This article discusses the resurgence of the term ‘patriarchy’ in digital culture and reflects on the everyday online meanings of the term in distinction to academic theorisations. In the 1960s–1980s, feminists theorised patriarchy as the systematic oppression of women, with differing approaches to how it worked. Criticisms that the concept was unable to account for intersectional experiences of oppression, alongside the ‘turn to culture’, resulted in a fall from academic grace. However, ‘patriarchy’ has found new life through Internet memes. This (...)
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  2. Queer Parents, Gendered Embodiment and the de-Essentialisation of Motherhood.Kate Henley Averett - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (2):284-304.
    Feminist theorists have long looked to motherhood and mothering behaviour as an important site at which to examine women’s lives, gender inequality and the social construction of gendered institutions. One important line of theorisation has concerned itself with the de-essentialisation of motherhood, a project that I argue remains incomplete, as feminist theorisation of motherhood naturalises biological sex and therefore essentialises mothering as behaviour performed by ‘female bodies’ and fathering behaviour as performed by ‘male bodies’. Using two cases from a larger (...)
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  3. Making Feminist Claims in the Post-Truth Era: The Authority of Personal Experience.Shelley Budgeon - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (2):248-267.
    The increased visibility of feminism in mainstream culture has recently been noted, with the presence of both online and offline campaigns embedding feminist claims in a variety of everyday spaces. By granting recognition to women’s experiences, these campaigns continue the feminist practice of generating critical knowledge on the basis of gendered experience. In the post-truth era, however, the norms governing claims-making are being significantly reconstructed, with significant consequences for critiques of gender inequality. It is argued here that these norms are (...)
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  4.  1
    Introduction: ‘Remembering Feminist Theory Forward’.Shelley Budgeon & Lucy Nicholas - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (2):159-164.
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  5.  1
    Ecofeminism Revisited: Critical Insights on Contemporary Environmental Governance.Emma Foster - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (2):190-205.
    Echoing other articles in this special issue, this article re-evaluates a collection of feminist works that fell out of fashion as a consequence of academic feminism embracing poststructuralist and postmodernist trends. In line with fellow contributors, the article critically reflects upon the unsympathetic reading of feminisms considered to be essentialising and universalistic, in order to re-evaluate, in my case, ecofeminism. As an introduction, I reflect on my own perhaps unfair rejection of ecofeminism as a doctoral researcher and early career academic (...)
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  6. Ethics and Political Imagination in Feminist Theory.Evelina Johansson Wilén - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (2):268-283.
    This article discusses three different conceptions of ethics within contemporary feminist theory and how they depict the connection between ethics and politics. The first position, represented by Wendy Brown, mainly describes ethics as a sort of anti-political moralism and apolitical individualism, and hence as a turn away from politics. The second position, represented by Saba Mahmood, discusses ethics as a precondition for politics, while the third position, represented by Vikki Bell, depicts it as the ‘external consciousness’ of the political, and (...)
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  7. Feminist Diagrams.Sam McBean - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (2):206-225.
    On 4 January 1971, Ti-Grace Atkinson delivered a talk entitled ‘Strategy and Tactics: A Presentation of Political Lesbianism’. The talk was later published in her collected essays, Amazon Odyssey. The essay contains thirty-five diagrams: ten ‘Strategy Charts’, three ‘Tactical Charts’ and twenty-two ‘Tactical-Strategy Charts’, which map a strategy of the ‘Oppressor’ and the tactics that the ‘Oppressed’ might develop to lead to a revolution – lesbians, significantly, are the ‘Buffer Zone’ between these two classes. In the only reference I have (...)
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  8.  2
    Remembering Simone de Beauvoir’s ‘Ethics of Ambiguity’ to Challenge Contemporary Divides: Feminism Beyond Both Sex and Gender.Lucy Nicholas - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (2):226-247.
    This article returns to Simone de Beauvoir’s philosophical oeuvre in order to offer a way of thinking beyond contemporary feminist divisions created by ‘gender critical’ or trans-exclusionary feminists. The ‘gender critical’ feminist position returns to sex essentialism to argue for ‘abolishing’ gender, while opponents often appeal to proliferated gender self-identities. I argue that neither goes far enough and that they both circumscribe utopian visions for a world beyond both sex and gender. I chart how Beauvoir’s ontological, ethical and political positions (...)
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  9. Producing the Category of ‘Islamist’ Women: A Deleuzian Perspective.Hesna Serra Aksel - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (1):129-148.
    When addressing the Muslim women question, one of the problematic issues is the centrality of a religious tradition or a political ideology as a primary subject of inquiry. Muslim women are seen as the embodiment of a singular tradition or ideology, as in the case of Turkey, where the contemporary headscarf-wearing women are represented as ‘Islamist’. In this project, I aim to problematise this stereotyping categorisation through ontological conceptualisations, inspired by the French thinker Gilles Deleuze. To implement the relational ontology (...)
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  10. Gender Performativity in Rural Northern Ghana: Implications for Transnational Feminist Theorising.Constance Awinpoka Akurugu - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (1):43-62.
    In this article, I draw on theories of gender performativity and on postcolonial African feminisms to develop an account of femininities in the rural context of northern Ghana. In doing this, I reflect on Judith Butler’s theory of gender as performative, that is, as constituted by the reiterative power of discourse to create and also constrain that which it names. Through an analysis of the findings from my participant observation fieldwork amongst the Dagaaba community in Serekpere in north-western Ghana, I (...)
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  11.  1
    Life has No #TriggerWarnings: Reflections on Triggering in Contexts of Violence.Ragi Bashonga - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (1):149-151.
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  12. Echoes of Victimhood: On Passionate Activism and ‘Sex Trafficking’.Sealing Cheng - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (1):3-22.
    The sexually violated woman has become a salient symbol in feminist discourse, government policies, the media and transnational activism at this historical juncture. In this article, I seek to understand the conviction of anti-prostitution activists that all women in prostitution are victims, and their simultaneous dismissal or condemnation of those women who identify as sex workers. The analysis identifies the centrality of victimhood to the affective logic of women activist leaders in the anti-prostitution movement, and its embeddedness in discourses of (...)
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  13.  4
    Refusing Abjection: Transphobia and Trans Youth Survivance.Julie James - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (1):109-128.
    This article argues that Julia Kristeva’s Powers of Horror: an Essay on Abjection lays out a theory that is not universal in its application, but rather details the violent emergence and defence of Eurocentric, colonial and orientalist subjectivities and related hierarchical social orders. The Eurocentrism found in Kristeva’s political and theoretical stances are referenced, with detailed attention paid to explicating how her theory of abjection describes a brutal, colonising, psychological and social mechanism. This framework is applied to transphobia and its (...)
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  14.  1
    Mythmaking as a Feminist Strategy: Rosi Braidotti’s Political Myth.Adam Kjellgren - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (1):63-80.
    This article makes visible some of the premises that underlie Rosi Braidotti’s use of myth. Focusing on some well-known characteristics of postmodernity, as well as the development of a new philosophy of subjectivity, I account for the divergence between Simone de Beauvoir, who thought of myth as a severe hindrance to the subject-becoming of women, and postmodern feminists, such as Donna Haraway and Braidotti, who represent a more affirmative stance. Through pinning down both similarities and differences between Haraway and Braidotti, (...)
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  15. A Lesson From ‘Cologne’ on Intersectionality: Strengthening Feminist Arguments Against Right-Wing Co-Option.Julia Schuster - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (1):23-42.
    Analysing feminist responses to the media coverage of the sexual assaults of New Year’s Eve 2015 in Cologne, this article shows how a theoretical concept that is used to frame feminist arguments can influence the strength of those arguments. German-speaking media extensively reported on the large number of sexual assaults against women that happened during that night in Cologne. The dominant narrative in those media reports dwells on the circumstance that the arrested suspects all had a refugee or migrant background, (...)
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  16.  3
    Bruised, Battered, Bleeding: The Dangers of Mobilising Abused Goddesses for ‘Women’s Empowerment’.Ayesha Vemuri - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (1):81-108.
    In September 2013, images of bruised, bleeding and battered Hindu goddesses went viral on social media networks. Saraswati, Lakshmi and Durga appear as victims of domestic abuse in the Abused Goddesses advertising campaign against domestic violence. In this article, I analyse the Abused Goddesses campaign and the conversations it generated. I argue that it reiterates both a form of Hindu nationalistic discourse as well as longstanding patriarchal, orientalist and neocolonialist perspectives about sexual violence in India. I examine the discourse generated (...)
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