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  1.  4
    Asking the question of it: trans/gender object lessons.Marquis Bey - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):317-322.
    This article queries the very question of and that is ‘gender’, from the vantage of transgender studies. In other words, it moves through Wiegman's question of the desires that propel us and asks what desires propel a feeling of gender's necessity, positing the possibility of relinquishing gender as a vector with the same kind of footing it currently has. In short, the question that is asked is gender itself, and the question is asked from a trans studies that excavates the (...)
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  2.  4
    Object Lessons in a time of tolerable suboptimisation.James Bliss - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):277-284.
    The present contribution reflects on the stakes of Robyn Wiegman's Object Lessons (2012) in the wake of a long era of austerity in American higher education. It reflects further on the history of discourses on the relationship between the practice of criticism and radical politics.
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  3.  4
    Alongside desire: Object Lessons and Working-Class Studies.Matt Brim - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):285-293.
    This article reconsiders Robyn Wiegman’s Object Lessons (2012) as a book that helps to discern a necessary relation between Queer Studies and Working-Class Studies, two fields that do not often share a footprint in the US academy. That relation emerges for the author in the unexpected resonance between Object Lessons and Vivian Gornick’s recently republished The Romance of American Communism (2020), a classic text about the politics of passionate longing for a better world. Likewise, Wiegman understands political desire as the (...)
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  4.  6
    Identity knowledges remixed: reflections on the itinerary of transgender.V. Varun Chaudhry - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):294-300.
    This article explores the uptake and circulation of ‘transgender’ in academic and philanthropic institutions, as a way of taking seriously Robyn Wiegman’s call for a divergentist approach. In so doing, the article aims to demonstrate the intimate entanglements between non-profit and academic spheres and identity knowledges therein. Taken together, both contexts reveal the messiness and complexities of institutionality, not only as a lived reality for individuals such as philanthropy professionals and academics, but also as an object of study itself.
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  5.  4
    Retrotopian feminism: the feminist 1970s, the literary utopia and Sarah Hall’s The Carhullan Army.Joe P. L. Davidson - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):243-261.
    In recent years, there has been increasing discontent with feminism’s understanding of its own history and, more specifically, the place of the feminist 1970s. Feminist scholars – most prominently, Elizabeth Freeman, Victoria Hesford, Kate Eichhorn and Kathi Weeks – have sought to move beyond the feelings of progress and nostalgia that the feminist 1970s often inspires. There is a need to mediate between the urge to leave the past behind and the desire to return to it, with feminists adopting positions (...)
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  6.  3
    Object lessons and the desire of psychoanalysis.Julien Fischer - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):309-316.
    In this article, “Object Lessons and the Desire of Psychoanalysis,” I meditate on the significance of Robyn Wiegman‘s 2012 monograph Object Lessons by examining the psychoanalytic significance of the concept of “transferential idealism” that Wiegman first introduced there. In doing so, I read Wiegman‘s Object Lessons through the lens of the book‘s psychoanalytic ethics and argue that the desire of Object Lessons is the desire of psychoanalysis: an enigmatic desire, borne from lack, which aims toward the proliferation of difference. By (...)
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  7.  6
    Technologies of (in)security: Masculinity and the complexity of neoliberalism.Steve Garlick - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):170-187.
    Although there is much feminist work that has examined the intersection of gender and neoliberalism, critical work on men and masculinities remains underdeveloped in this area. This article suggests that complexity theory is a crucial resource for a critical analysis of the ways in which masculinities contribute to the ongoing maintenance of neoliberal socio-economic systems. Critical work on neoliberalism and capitalist economics has recently been drawn to complex systems theory, as evidenced by the work of scholars such as Sylvia Walby, (...)
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  8.  5
    Theorising violence in mobility: A case of Nepali women migrant workers.Barbara Grossman-Thompson - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):227-242.
    In this article, I examine violence as constitutive of mobility for the feminine diasporic subject through an examination of women migrant workers from Nepal. I frame this project with two distinct theoretical approaches to understanding violence. First, I draw upon Catharine MacKinnon's provocative question ‘Are women human?’ to elucidate points of disjuncture between individual women migrants and state policy that dehumanises them. Second, I address some of the gaps in MacKinnon's work by turning to Judith Butler's theory of violence as (...)
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  9.  5
    Reading Object Lessons in India today.Mary E. John - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):323-329.
    This essay situates Object Lessons in the contemporary academic spaces of women’s studies in India. A decade ago, Object Lessons offered an extensive critique of identity knowledges in the US academy with a special focus on women’s studies. What might its relevance be in the contemporary Indian context? The institutionalisation of women’s studies in India has been shaped by the resources of the social sciences, with their empirical bent and especially their connection to state and development policy. This makes for (...)
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  10.  3
    Re-membering Red Riding Hood: situated solidarities between Ireland and Uganda.Ruth Kelly - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):208-226.
    Red Riding Hood is a story that has been retold and reimagined more frequently than most. Where the oral tradition often celebrated Red's sexuality and cunning, literary versions transform the tale into one in which a young girl is blamed for her own rape – or, in many feminist versions, where she fights back. Drawing on discussions with writers and feminist activists in Uganda, and on work by Ugandan and Irish writers and scholars, I explore how this troubling and ambiguous (...)
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  11.  4
    Speculative feminism and the shifting frontiers of bioscience: envisioning reproductive futures with synthetic gametes through the ethnographic method.Mianna Meskus - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):151-169.
    Scientists are developing a technique called in vitro gametogenesis or IVG to generate synthetic gametes for research and, potentially, for treating infertility. What would it mean for feminist concerns over the future of reproductive practice and biotechnological development if egg and sperm cells could be produced in laboratory conditions? In this article, I take on the question by discussing the emerging technique of IVG through the speculative feminist analysis of ambiguous reproductive futures. Feminist cultural and science studies scholars have explored (...)
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  12.  9
    Object Lessons at 10: a conversation.Jennifer C. Nash & Robyn Wiegman - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):262-276.
    This conversation returns to Robyn Wiegman's field-defining Object Lessons, reflecting on the book's travels, resonances, and continued importance a decade after its publication.
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  13.  8
    ‘In retrospect’: Object Lessons forum.Britt Rusert, Kinohi Nishikawa & Kadji Amin - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):301-308.
    Our contribution takes shape as reflections on Object Lessons (Wiegman, 2012) from the perspective of three scholars of race, gender and sexuality who were also graduate students of Robyn Wiegman in the mid-2000s at Duke University. All three of us took Introduction to Feminist Theory with her and all three of us received graduate certificates in Feminist Studies. Our educational and career trajectories also share this similarity: we received PhDs in the disciplines (English, Comparative Literature and French), but went on (...)
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  14.  41
    Feminist theory and the problem of misogyny.Samantha Pinson Wrisley - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):188-207.
    Feminist theory, broadly construed, lacks a comprehensive theory of misogyny. While there has been a great deal of feminist work dedicated to analysing the social, cultural, political, and institutional effects of misogyny, the ancillary theories of misogyny these analyses produce are only ever partial, fragmented, vague or conceptually inconsistent. This article engages and critiques these theories by focusing on three separate but related issues within existing feminist scholarship on misogyny: the conflation of misogyny with sexism, the elision of misogyny's affective (...)
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  15.  8
    The fetish economy of sex and gender activism: transnational appropriation and allyship.L. L. Wynn & Saffaa Hassanein - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (2):125-150.
    This article examines what happens when local gender rights activism is taken up by international allies and appropriators, using case studies of activism in Saudi Arabia and India. The relationship between local and transnational activists is shaped by histories of Euro-Americans writing about the gendered organisation of Eastern societies. In an economic system where nongovernmental activist groups compete for donor support, political causes are commodities with value, and value is generated through representations (e.g. of patriarchal oppression). These representations of the (...)
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  16.  4
    From the families we choose to the families we find online: media technology and queer family making.Rikke Andreassen - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (1):12-29.
    Since the mid-2000s, a number of Western countries have witnessed an increase in the number of children born into ‘alternative’ or ‘queer’ families. Parallel with this queer baby boom, online media technologies have become intertwined with most people’s intimate lives. While these two phenomena have appeared simultaneously, their integration has seldom been explored. In an attempt to fill this gap, the present article explores the ways in which contemporary queer reproduction is interwoven with online media practices. Importantly, the article does (...)
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  17.  7
    Queering the kinship story: constructing connection through LGBTQ family narratives.Eliza Garwood - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (1):30-46.
    Recent research into LGBTQ kinship has suggested that reproductive technology might stabilise and/or disrupt dominant ideals about the importance of biogenetic relatedness in family formation. This article examines the way adults raised in lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) households are interested in tracing queer family histories, rather than solely their biological relations. Data comes from biographical narrative interviews with twenty-two adult children raised by LGBTQ parents. The article examines how participants’ kinship stories relate to parents’ identities and journeys (...)
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  18.  3
    One donor egg and ‘a dollop of love’: ART and de-queering genealogies in Facebook advertising.Tanya Kant & Elizabeth Reed - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (1):47-67.
    We consider what genealogical links, kinship and sociality are promised through the marketing of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs). Using a mixed method of formal analysis of Facebook's algorithmic architectures and textual analysis of twenty-eight adverts for egg donation drawn from the Facebook Ad Library, we analyse the ways in which the figure of the ‘fertile woman’ is constituted both within the text and at the level of Facebook's targeted advertising systems. We critically examine the ways in which ART clinics address (...)
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  19.  4
    Mothering against motherhood: doula work, xenohospitality and the idea of the momrade.Sophie A. Lewis - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (1):68-85.
    Today, a new vein of queer Marxist-feminist family-abolitionist theorising is reviving contemporary feminists’ willingness to imagine, politically, what women's liberationists in the 1970s called ‘mothering against motherhood’. Concurrently, the jokey portmanteau ‘momrade’, i.e. mom + comrade, has circulated persistently in the twenty-first century on online forums maintained by communities of mothers and/or leftists. This article asks: what if, in the name of abolishing the family, we took the joke entirely seriously? What makes a ‘mom’ a ‘momrade’, or vice versa? In (...)
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  20.  3
    Queering genealogies: introduction to the special section.Kate O’Riordan & Elizabeth Reed - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (1):3-11.
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  21.  2
    Re-membering: Tracing epistemic implications of feminist and gendered politics under military occupation.Niharika Pandit - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (1):102-122.
    In this article, I trace ‘re-membering’ as a feminist practice in the context of gendered activism under military occupation in Kashmir. Drawing on its anticolonial feminist roots, I conceptualise re-membering as practices that do not simply put together what has been severed or dismembered by coloniality but they also, in doing so, propose different frames of looking. I think through re-membering by focusing on two intertwining sites of gendered and feminist activism in Kashmir: protests that re-member the disappeared and activist (...)
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  22.  10
    Understanding ‘fat shaming’ in a neoliberal era: Performativity, healthism and the UK’s ‘obesity epidemic’.Tanisha Jemma Rose Spratt - 2023 - Feminist Theory 24 (1):86-101.
    This article explores how ‘fat shaming’ as a practice that encourages open disdain for those living in larger bodies operates as a moralising tool to regulate and manage those who are viewed as ‘bad citizens’. It begins by outlining the problematic use of fat shaming language that is often used as a tool to promote ‘healthy’ lifestyle choices by those who view it as not only an acceptable way of communicating the health risks associated with obesity, but also a productive (...)
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