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  1.  3
    The Term “Political Oeconomy” in Adam Smith.Luigi Alonzi - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):321-339.
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  2.  4
    Savages, Romans, and Despots: Thinking About Others From Montaigne to Herder.Linda Andersson Burnett - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):375-377.
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  3.  20
    A Science of Concord: The Politics of Commercial Knowledge in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain.Jon Cooper - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2).
    This article recovers mid-century proposals for sciences of concord and contextualizes them as part of a broader politics of commercial knowledge in eighteenth-century Britain. It begins by showing how merchants gained authority as formulators of commercial policy during the Commerce Treaty debates of 1713–1714. This authority held fast during the Walpolean oligarchy, but collapsed by the 1740s, when lobbying and patronage were increasingly maligned as corrupt by a ferment of popular republicanism. The article then explores how the Anglican cleric Josiah (...)
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  4.  1
    Idola Fori and Language: Francis Bacon as a Source for Giambattista Vico.Marta Fattori - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):225-245.
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  5.  9
    Moral Conscience’s Fall From Grace: An Investigation Into Conceptual History.Hasse J. Hämäläinen - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):283-299.
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  6.  3
    Self-Love, Egoism and the Selfish Hypothesis: Key Debates From Eighteenth-Century British Moral Philosophy.James A. Harris - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):373-375.
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  7. Hobbesian Causation and Personal Identity in the History of Criminology.Luke William Hunt - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):247-266.
    Hobbes is known for bridging natural and political philosophy, but less attention has been given to how this distinguishes the Hobbesian conception of the self from individualist strands of liberalism. First, Hobbes’s determinism suggests a conception of the self in which externalities determine the will and what the self is at every moment. Second, there is no stable conception of the self because externalities keep it in a constant state of flux. The metaphysical underpinnings of his project downplay the notion (...)
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  8.  7
    “The Moral Arithmetic”: Morality in the Age of Mathematics.Mordechai Levy-Eichel - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):267-282.
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  9.  6
    Faces of Moderation: The Art of Balance in an Age of Extremes.Nicholas Mithen - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):363-367.
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  10.  2
    After Council Communism: The Post-War Rediscovery of the Council Tradition.James Muldoon - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):341-362.
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  11.  4
    Divine Law Divided: Francisco de Vitoria on Civil and Ecclesiastical Powers.Nathaniel Mull - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):201-223.
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  12.  1
    Thomas Harriot: A Life in Science.David Harris Sacks - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):369-372.
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  13.  10
    Mary Astell’s Radical Criticism of Gender Inequality.Martin Fog Lantz Arndal - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):91-110.
  14.  11
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn on the Virtue of Atheists.Jacqueline Broad - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):111-128.
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  15.  6
    “There Remains Nothing to Lose for the One Who has Lost Liberty”: Liberty and Free Will in Arcangela Tarabotti’s (1604–1652) Radical Criticism of the Patriarchy. [REVIEW]Sabrina Ebbersmeyer - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):7-26.
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  16.  3
    Where Are the Female Radicals?Sabrina Ebbersmeyer & Gianni Paganini - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):1-6.
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  17.  3
    “We Shall Be the Mother of Jesus.” Visions of Power Among Radical Religious Women in Northern Europe, 1690–1760.Juliane Engelhardt - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):73-90.
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  18.  4
    Catharine Macaulay and the Concept of “Radical Enlightenment”.Karen Green - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):165-180.
    Margaret Jacob and Jonathan Israel have offered somewhat different accounts of what they call the ‘Radical Enlightenment’, that is those elements of enlightenment thought which resulted in the radical political upheavals of the late eighteenth century and the rise of democratic republicanism. Jonathan Israel, in particular, insists that the radical enlightenment was radical both in its secular rejection of all providentialist and teleological metaphysics, as well as radical in its democratic tendencies. This paper looks at the way in which Catharine (...)
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  19.  4
    Radicalism, Religion and Mary Wollstonecraft.Sarah Hutton - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):181-198.
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  20.  3
    Were There Any Radical Women in the German Enlightenment? On Feminist History of Philosophy and Dorothea Erxleben’s Rigorous Investigation.Anne-Sophie Sørup Nielsen - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):143-163.
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  21.  6
    Sexual Desire, Gender Equality and Radical Free-Thinking: Theophrastus Redivivus (1659) as a Proto-Feminist Text.Gianni Paganini - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):27-49.
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  22.  3
    Pathways to Agency: Women Writers and Radical Thought in the Low Countries, 1500–1800.Marrigje Paijmans, Feike Dietz, Nina Geerdink, Inger Leemans, Cécile de Morrée & Martine Veldhuizen - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):51-71.
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  23.  3
    Émile Du Ch'telet and Her Examens de la Bible: A Radical Clandestine Woman Philosopher.Maria Susana Seguin - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):129-141.
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