American Journal of Philology

ISSNs: 0002-9475, 1086-3168

11 found

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  1.  12
    Disappearing into Thick Aēr : The Function of Aēr in homer and Anaximenes.Benjamin Folit-Weinberg - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (2):183-219.
    Aēr in Homer has rarely been discussed; the few studies that do exist focus on the word's semantics and scope of reference. This article proposes that we focus instead on how aēr works and what aēr does, both to characters within the Iliad and the Odyssey and, especially, for the poet responsible for composing them. First, I argue that aēr offers the poet a stratagem for navigating complex narrative demands and that it is best understood primarily in terms of the (...)
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  2.  2
    Perhaps a Fish, Surely an Ostrich, and Definitely a Fool: The Ontology of Insults at De Constantia Sapientis 17.1.Tommaso Gazzarri - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (2):285-320.
    De Constantia Sapientis 17.1 contains two animal-based insults, the interpretation of which has heretofore proven controversial because of the difficulties in pinpointing the exact nature/identity of comparandum and comparatum. An adequate appreciation of the passage requires assessing the function of these contumeliae within Seneca's philosophical strategy. Their ontological vacuity reflects the imaginative status of the two animals selected to construct the jibes. Thus, one should resist rage, not only on account of this passion being self-damaging but also because imagination is (...)
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  3.  8
    Subeunt Amazones : Tracing the Amazons in Statius' Achilleid.Julene Abad Del Vecchio - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (2):321-349.
    This article investigates the presence of Amazonian imagery in Statius' Achilleid. It begins by uncovering intertexts to Aeneid 1 in the arrival of Ulysses and Diomedes on Scyros ( Ach. 1.726–58), which create a layer of erotic tension that is vital for the interpretation of the ensuing simile comparing Achilles, Deidamia, and Lycomedes' daughters with Amazons ( Ach. 1.758–60). A comprehensive analysis of the simile allows a re-examination of Statius' echoes to the portrayals of Hippolyte and Theseus in Thebaid 12, (...)
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  4.  2
    Horace-as-Alcaeus ( Odes 3.6) Impersonates Horace-as-Archilochus ( Epodes 7 And 16): Persona And Poetic Autobiography In Horace. [REVIEW]Shirley Werner - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (2):251-283.
    A reader's enjoyment of Odes 3.6 and Epodes 7 and 16 is deepened by an awareness of the interplay between two relationships in Horace's poetry: the relationship of the speaker within the poem to an internal audience; and the interpretive relationship between the reader and the unstable persona of the implied author, Horace. The Archilochean authorial persona of Horace's Epodes and the Alcaic authorial persona of Horace's Odes work together to create a pseudo-autobiography of his life as a movement through (...)
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  5.  13
    Cicero and the Mirage of the Tirocinium Fori.Peter White - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (2):221-250.
    Assumptions about the tirocinium fori are based on claims by Joachim Marquardt that it was a form of training for young elite Romans at about the age of 16, that it lasted for one year, and that it consisted of mentorship by a distinguished elder. Though there is little evidence to support these claims, the theory of a tirocinium fori continues to influence discussions of oratory in the age of Cicero, where it gives a false picture of the process by (...)
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  6.  5
    The Pleasures of Flattery and the Hermeneutics of Suspicion in Seneca's Natural Questions (4a Praef. ).Chiara Graf - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (1):109-144.
    Abstract:In many of his works, Seneca puts a philosophical premium on the ability to see through the deceptive appearances of words and things, identifying the hidden truths that underlie these appearances. In this paper, I turn to a passage that casts doubt upon the efficacy of this interpretive method: Seneca's excursus on flattery in the preface to Book 4a of the Natural Questions. Seneca locates in flattery a pleasure that listeners cannot eradicate by exposing its insincerity. By undermining a hermeneutic (...)
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  7.  7
    Meta-Literature and Mimesis in the Rhetorica ad Herennium 4.1–10.Luca Grillo - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (1):41-72.
    Abstract:In the prologue to the Rhetorica ad Herennium Book 4, the author boldly departs from tradition and explains that he will create his own examples, rather than drawing from poets and orators. This methodological discussion portrays itself as an exemplum and hence carries a meta-literary and mimetic dimension. In particular, this prologue anticipates and illustrates the precept propounded in Book 4; its fine style and rhythm amount to a defense of rhetoric itself; and this defense must be considered in the (...)
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  8.  3
    Commentary on Augustine City of God, Books 1–5 by Gillian Clark (review).James J. O'Donnell - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (1):179-181.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Commentary on Augustine City of God, Books 1–5 by Gillian ClarkJames J. O'DonnellCommentary on Augustine City of God, Books 1–5. By Gillian Clark. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021. Pp. xii + 281. ISBN: 978-0-19-887007-4.Pierre Bayard's masterful How to Talk about Books You Haven't Read offers soothing balm for readers in the daunting presence of Augustine's City of God. Weighing in at a third of a million words, Augustine's (...)
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  9.  14
    Herodian and Severan Historiography.Andrew G. Scott - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (1):145-177.
    Abstract:This paper examines the historiographic controversies and disagreements surrounding the figure of Septimius Severus and highlighted by Herodian in his Roman History as a means of investigating the development of history writing during and in the aftermath of that emperor's reign. Herodian cites Severus' transition to power and reign as a locus for historical and historiographical controversy and debate, and a comparison of Herodian with other Severan writers allows for an examination of Herodian's competitive relationship with his older historiographic peers (...)
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  10.  5
    My Angry Muse: The Metapoetic Interplay Between Juno and Vergil.Špela Tomažinčič - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (1):73-107.
    Abstract:This paper explores the poetic interplay between the poet and angry goddess Juno, the two metacharacters in the Aeneid, that is central to the composition of Vergil's epic poem. In addition to the conflicting characterization that links both figures with the epic as well as elegiac genres, their agonistic relationship evokes a typically elegiac discourse between the poet-lover and his dura puella that is known to play a role in his poetic language. The power dynamics of elegy that Vergil has (...)
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  11.  5
    "More Useful and More Trustworthy": The Reception of the Greek Epic Cycle in Scholia to Homer, Pindar, and Euripides.Jennifer Weintritt - 2023 - American Journal of Philology 144 (1):1-39.
    Abstract:This article examines the citation context of fragments from the Epic Cycle in scholia in order to re-assess its ancient reception. In contrast to negative comments like Callimachus', literary criticism in practice demonstrates that the Cycle held great authority among readers and critics. In the Homeric scholia, commentators vigorously debated whether Cyclical epics should aid in the interpretation of Homer. In the scholia to Pindar and Euripides, the Cycle was used to explicate and even to emend the text. For Hellenistic (...)
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