Classical Antiquity

ISSN: 0278-6656

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  1.  20
    Feeling for Augustine.Catherine Conybeare - 2024 - Classical Antiquity 43 (1):1-18.
    This essay promotes affective engagement with the texts we read, arguing that we should attend both to recognizing emotion within the texts and to allowing ourselves to feel emotion as we read. The essay thus aligns itself with contemporary theories of non-hermeneutic or surface reading. The argument is illustrated specifically by the relationship of Augustine of Hippo (354–430 CE) to the emotion of anger. The transcripts of the Council of Carthage, held in 411, show an eruption of anger on Augustine’s (...)
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  2.  20
    Oedipus Haerens_: Paranoid Lagging in Seneca’s _Phoenissae.Chiara Graf - 2024 - Classical Antiquity 43 (1):19-49.
    This paper is an attempt to think through paranoia’s epistemic and affective features, which pervade both the worldview presented in Senecan tragedy and the inner life of many of its protagonists. Drawing upon recent literary-critical work, I argue that paranoia is temporally and epistemically ambivalent: subjects simultaneously attempt to “get ahead” of a looming cataclysm—looking to the future in an attempt to avert disaster—while inevitably “falling behind,” failing to predict or preempt the future in time to protect themselves. Much of (...)
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  3.  20
    Life Cycles beyond the Human: Biomass and Biorhythms in Heraclitus.James I. Porter - 2024 - Classical Antiquity 43 (1):50-96.
    All parts of Heraclitus’ cosmos are simultaneously living and dying. Its constituent stuffs (“biomasses”) cycle endlessly through physical changes in sweeping patterns (“biorhythms”) that are reflected in the dynamic rhythms of Heraclitus’ own thought and language. These natural processes are best examined at a more-than-human level that exceeds individuation, stable identity, rational comprehension, and linguistic capture. B62 (“mortals immortals”), one of Heraclitus’ most perplexing fragments, models these processes in a spectacular fashion: it describes the imbrication not only of humans and (...)
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  4.  17
    Homer and the Simile at Sea.Alex Purves - 2024 - Classical Antiquity 43 (1):97-123.
    In this paper I consider ways in which seawater––both on its surface and in its depths––opens up alternative forms of thought and expression in Homer, especially with respect to the body. By tracking the relationship between body and simile as it is mediated by the surface of the sea, I argue that water emerges as an especially mobile and adaptive medium for expressing the transformation that takes place between self and simile in Homer. In the Iliad, similes are well-known for (...)
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  5.  17
    Working for the Emperor at Antium: Profession and Prestige in the Fasti Antiates Ministrorum Domus Augustae.Molly Swetnam-Burland - 2024 - Classical Antiquity 43 (1):124-166.
    The Fasti Antiates Ministrorum Domus Augustae, a large inscription associated with the imperial villa at Antium, is best known for its iteration of the Augustan calendar. In this article, I reassess the fasti in their entirety, focusing on their manner of display and social function. I place special emphasis on the section of the inscription, largely overlooked, that contains the annual records of magistrates who led the voluntary association that commissioned the inscription, a detailed record of two decades of local (...)
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  6.  16
    Translating Aphrodite: The Sandal-Binder in Two Roman Contexts.Hérica Valladares - 2024 - Classical Antiquity 43 (1):167-215.
    The Sandal-Binder Aphrodite, a witty variation on Praxiteles’ Aphrodite of Knidos, is one of the most frequently reproduced sculptural types in Greco-Roman art. Created in a variety of materials throughout the Mediterranean, extant versions of this iconography show the goddess in the act of tying (or possibly untying) her sandal. Although a large number of these works of art date between the first and fourth century CE, most studies on the Sandal-Binder have approached it primarily as an expression of Hellenistic (...)
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