Year:

  1.  36
    Consequentialism, Collective Action, and Causal Impotence.Tim Aylsworth & Adam Pham - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):336-349.
    This paper offers some refinements to a particular objection to act consequentialism, the “causal impotence” objection. According to proponents of the objection, when we find circumstances in which severe, unnecessary harms result entirely from voluntary acts, it seems as if we should be able to indict at least one act among those acts, but act consequentialism appears to lack the resources to offer this indictment. Our aim is to show is that the most promising response on behalf of act consequentialism, (...)
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  2.  9
    A Care-Based Approach to Transformative Change: Ethically-Informed Practices, Relational Response-Ability & Emotional Awareness.Angela Moriggi, Katriina Soini, Alex Franklin & Dirk Roep - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):281-298.
  3.  5
    The Invasive Species Diet: The Ethics of Eating Lionfish as a Wildlife Management Strategy.Samantha Noll & Brittany Davis - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):320-335.
  4.  20
    The Case for ‘Contributory Ethics’: Or How to Think About Individual Morality in a Time of Global Problems.Travis N. Rieder & Justin Bernstein - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):299-319.
  5.  12
    Gene Drives, Species, and Compassion for Individuals in Conservation Biology.Yasha Rohwer - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):243-260.
  6.  7
    Luck Has Nothing to Do with It: Prevailing Uncertainty and Responsibilities of Due Care.Levente Szentkirályi - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (3):261-280.
  7.  21
    Rethinking Wilderness: By Mark Woods, Peterborough, Ontario, Broadview Press, 2017, 312 Pp., $29.95 (Paperback), ISBN: 978-1-55111-348-7.Elisa Aaltola - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):240-242.
    The first impression after opening Mark Wood’s Rethinking Wilderness is that of vigor and thoroughness: clearly a significant amount of research and work has gone into this book. In analyzing diffe...
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  8.  11
    The Most Good We Can Do or the Best Person We Can Be?Michel Bourban & Lisa Broussois - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):159-179.
    We challenge effective altruism (EA) on the basis that it should be more inclusive regarding the demands of altruism. EA should consider carefully agents’ intentions and the role those intentions can play in agents’ moral lives. Although we argue that good intentions play an instrumental role and can lead to better results, by adopting a Hutchesonian perspective, we show that intentions should, first and foremost, be considered for their intrinsic value. We examine offsetting and geoengineering, two so-called solutions to climate (...)
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  9. Pervasive Captivity and Urban Wildlife.Nicolas Delon - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):123-143.
    Urban animals can benefit from living in cities, but this also makes them vulnerable as they increasingly depend on the advantages of urban life. This article has two aims. First, I provide a detailed analysis of the concept of captivity and explain why it matters to nonhuman animals—because and insofar as many of them have a (non-substitutable) interest in freedom. Second, I defend a surprising implication of the account—pushing the boundaries of the concept while the boundaries of cities and human (...)
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  10. When Ecology Needs Economics and Economics Needs Ecology: Interdisciplinary Exchange During the Anthropocene.S. Andrew Inkpen & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):203-221.
    ABSTRACT Evidence that humans play a dominant role in most ecosystems forces scientists to confront systems that contain factors transgressing traditional disciplinary boundaries. However, it is an open question whether this state of affairs should encourage interdisciplinary exchange or integration. With two case studies, we show that exchange between ecologists and economists is preferable, for epistemological and policy-oriented reasons, to their acting independently. We call this “exchange gain.” Our case studies show that theoretical exchanges can be less disruptive to current (...)
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  11.  10
    The Tragic Death of a Utah Goblin: Conservation and the Problem of Abiotic Nature.Alexander Lee - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):144-158.
    ABSTRACT Biocentric and ecocentric ethics offer a rich discourse on protecting biotic communities – defending conservation with inherent value tied to life. A problem arises from these views if mountains, glaciers, canyons, and other abiotic natural objects matter in and of themselves. Abiotic nature helps demonstrate and delineate the boundaries of environmental ethics grounded in life-based axiology. A series of thought experiments suggest that orienting conservation as a question of obligation offers an additional avenue to explore and defend the protection (...)
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  12.  5
    State Commissioning of Solar Radiation Management Geoengineering.Andrew Lockley - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):180-202.
    ABSTRACT Solar Radiation Management is a proposed response to Anthropogenic Global Warming. Other papers consider private SRM provision, e.g. via Voluntary Carbon Offsets. Limited VCO markets would under-supply SRM, so state provision or mandating is possible. Public funding does not presume state execution; private subcontracting is feasible. Notwithstanding concerns about privatization, we assume state commissioning of SRM – proposing and analyzing plausible governance, by adapting extant proposals. We consider two regulatory functions: legal/corporate; and scientific/technical. We briefly discuss mandatory, emissions-linked SRM (...)
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  13.  5
    The Case for a 21st Century Wilderness Ethic.Brian Petersen & John Hultgren - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):222-239.
    ABSTRACT Past debates surrounding wilderness have not led to constructive dialogue but instead have created a rift between dueling sides. Far from academic, this debate has important ethical, policy, and practical implications. We outline out the major fault lines of the debate between wilderness realists and constructivists and also identify common ground between them. From this starting point, we offer three potential bridges between them and conclude by proposing a preliminary vision of a 21st Century wilderness ethic focused on social-ecological (...)
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  14.  7
    Participatory Budgeting for Environmental Justice.Shane Epting - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (1):22-36.
    Corrective measures and remediation efforts aimed at alleviating the conditions of environmental injustice usually depend on federal or state funding. However, such resources could disappear, leavi...
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  15. Human Enhancement and the Proper Response to Climate Change.James Fanciullo - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (1):85-96.
    Several philosophers have argued that human enhancements should be considered a potential solution to climate change. In this paper, I consider one such argument offered by S. Matthew Liao, Anders Sandberg, and Rebecca Roache. I argue that, while their argument is plausible, we have an even stronger reason to consider enhancements a potential solution. In particular, enhancements could align our interests with the promotion of a proper response to climate change: if enhancements were in our interest to adopt and also (...)
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  16.  5
    Traditional Environmental Values as the Frameworks for Environmental Legislation in Russia.Elena Gladun & Olga V. Zakharova - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (1):37-52.
    Sustainable development has increasingly found its way into the context of environmental legislation. Russian environmental legislation is not effective for transitioning toward sustainable develop...
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  17.  6
    Moral Leadership and Climate Change Policy: The Role of the World Conservation Union.Prue Taylor, Don Brown & Peter Burdon - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (1):1-21.
    The importance and urgency of using ethical principles in the creation and content of climate change policy is well recognised. This article closely examines the World Conservation Union’s e...
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  18.  9
    The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming: By David Wallace-Wells, New York, NY, Tim Duggan Books, 2019, 320 Pp., 27 USD.00 (Hardcover), ISBN 978-0525576709.Aart Van Gils - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (1):118-121.
    Volume 23, Issue 1, March 2020, Page 118-121.
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  19.  7
    ‘Not the Wolf Itself’: Distinguishing Hunters’ Criticisms of Wolves From Procedures for Making Wolf Management Decisions.Erica von Essen & Michael Allen - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (1):97-113.
    Swedish hunters sometimes appeal to an inviolate ‘right to exist’ for wolves, apparently rejecting NIMBY. Nevertheless, the conditions existence hunters impose on wolves in practice fundamentally c...
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  20.  9
    Going Green is Good for You: Why We Need to Change the Way We Think About Pro-Environmental Behavior.Michael Prinzing - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-18.
    Awareness and concern about climate change are widespread. But rates of pro-environmental behaviour are low. This is partly due to the way in which pro-environmental behaviour is framed—as a sacrifice or burden that individuals bear for the planet and future generations. This framing elicits well-known cognitive biases, discouraging what we should be encouraging. We should abandon the self-sacrifice framing, and instead frame pro-environmental behaviour as intrinsically desirable. There is a large body of evidence that, around the world, people who are (...)
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