Ethics, Policy and Environment

ISSNs: 2155-0085, 2155-0093

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  1. Hope in an Illiberal Age? [REVIEW]Mark R. Reiff - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 2024 (January):1-9.
    In this commentary on Darrel Moellendorf’s Mobilizing Hope: Climate Change & Global Poverty (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2022), I discuss his use of the precautionary principle, whether his hope for climate-friendly ‘green growth’ is realistic given the tendency for inequality to accelerate as it gets higher, and what I call his assumption of a liberal baseline. That is, I worry that the audience to whom the book is addressed are those who already accept the environmental and economic values to which (...)
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  2.  21
    Norms of Species Translocation 50 Years After the Ethic of Organic Diversity.Colby J. Clark - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (2):271-279.
    From island biogeography theory, the ethic of organic diversity was posited as a precept to guide applied biogeography. It states that humanity must act in such a way as to reduce the rate of worldwide species extinction for an indefinite period of time. Almost 50 years later, the ethic of organic diversity remains relevant in the context of the debate over species translocation practices. Ultimately, matters of biodiversity conservation are too complex to expect an exceptionless moral framework to determine whether (...)
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  3.  55
    Beyond Intrinsic and Instrumental: Third-Category Value in Environmental Ethics and Environmental Policy.Anna Https://Orcidorg Deplazes-Zemp - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (2):166-188.
    Values have always tended to play a central role in discourse on the environment, a tendency which is currently particularly evident in the biodiversity context. Traditionally, arguments about the environment have invoked instrumental value to highlight the necessity or utility of a healthy environment for people and intrinsic value to emphasize the importance of protecting nature for its own sake. More recently, this value dichotomy has been challenged, and the notion of a third value category – relational value – has (...)
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  4.  16
    Limited Aggregation for Resolving Human-Wildlife Conflicts.Matthias Eggel & Angela K. Martin - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (2):147-165.
    Human-wildlife interactions frequently lead to conflicts – about the fair use of natural resources, for example. Various principled accounts have been proposed to resolve such interspecies conflicts. However, the existing frameworks are often inadequate to the complexities of real-life scenarios. In particular, they frequently fail because they do not adequately take account of the qualitative importance of individual interests, their relative importance, and the number of individuals affected. This article presents a limited aggregation account designed to overcome these shortcomings and (...)
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  5.  34
    What the Heck Cattle Have to Do with Environmentalism: Rewilding and the Continuous Project of the Human Management of Nature.Eric Katz - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (2):227-249.
    In the 1920s and 1930s, an attempt was made to resurrect the aurochs (Bos primigenius primigenius), the extinct wild ancestor of contemporary domestic cattle. The back-bred species that was produced are called ‘Heck cattle’. I argue that the attempt to create the Heck cattle as a form of resurrected aurochs, and their subsequent use in rewilding projects (as in the Oostvaardersplassen in the Netherlands) is a prime example of the continuous human project of the domination of nature. The consideration of (...)
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  6.  40
    Synthetic Biology and the Goals of Conservation.Christopher Hunter Lean - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (2):250-270.
    The introduction of new genetic material into wild populations, using novel biotechnology, has the potential to fortify populations against existential threats, and, controversially, create wild genetically modified populations. The introduction of new genetic variation into populations, which will have an ongoing future in areas of conservation interest, complicates long-held values in conservation science and park management. I discuss and problematize, in light of genetic intervention, what I consider the three core goals of conservation science: biodiversity, ecosystem services, and wilderness. This (...)
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  7.  30
    Southern Resident Orca Conservation: Practical, Ethical, and Political Issues.Samantha Muka & Chris Zarpentine - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (2):189-204.
    This article focuses on practical, ethical and political issues that arise in the context of cetacean conservation. Our point of departure is the controversy surrounding plans to assist J50, an ailing member of the southern resident orca population, during the summer of 2018. A brief history of cetacean captivity provides context for the current backlash against captivity. We then argue that, in many cases, interventions aimed at capture, rehabilitation and release are practically feasible and that such interventions are ethically justifiable. (...)
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  8.  37
    The Concept of Extinction: Epistemology, Responsibility, and Precaution.Fenner Stanley Tanswell - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (2):205-226.
    Extinction is a concept of rapidly growing importance, with the world currently in the sixth mass extinction event and a biodiversity crisis. However, the concept of extinction has itself received surprisingly little attention from philosophers. I will first argue that in practice there is no single unified concept of extinction, but instead that its usage divides between descriptive, epistemic, and declarative concepts. I will then consider the epistemic challenges that arise in ascertaining whether a species has gone extinct, and how (...)
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  9.  41
    Using Synthetic Biology to Avert Runaway Climate Change: A Consequentialist Appraisal.Daniele Fulvi & Josh Wodak - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):89-107.
    We attempt to justify the use of synthetic biology in response to the climate crisis, based on the premise that it is impossible to avert runaway climate change without sequestering sufficient greenhouse gases (GHG), which could only become possible through Negative Emissions Technologies (NETs). Then, moving from a consequentialist standpoint, we acquiesce to how the consequences of using NETs through synthetic biology are preferable to the catastrophic consequences of runaway climate change. In conclusion, we show how our analysis of synthetic (...)
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  10.  39
    Accounting for Future Generations in Energy Ethics: The Case for Temporalized Ethical Matrices.Céline Kermisch & Christophe Depaus - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):30-47.
    Accounting for future generations is central in energy ethics and the ethical matrix can be used to reveal ethical impacts on them. However, the way it integrates future generations is questionable. The aim of this paper is to show why this tool does not consider ethical impacts on future generations appropriately and to propose a novel temporalized framework, which characterizes future people according to temporal, spatial and role features. By stimulating the disclosure of intergenerational conflicts, this temporalized matrix provides support (...)
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  11.  32
    Thinking about Hope, Vision, and Mobilization with Darrel Moellendorf’s Mobilizing Hope.John M. Meyer - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):108-111.
    Darrel Moellendorf places hope at the core of his call for climate-change vision and action, positing a ‘hopeful vision of a sustainable and prosperous world’ committed to ‘green growth’ – along th...
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  12.  35
    Mobilizing Hope Against Pessimism and Plutocracy.Darrel Moellendorf - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):129-145.
    This paper offers responses to the challenges and questions rasied by the comments of John M. Meyer, Gwen Ottinger, Mark Reiff, and Steve Vanderheiden to my book Mobilizing Hope: Climate Change and Global Poverty. Their concerns are insightful, many, and varied. My reply focuses on the following themes: The relationship between moral concern about climate change and moral concern abut global poverty, the role of hope in responding to climate change, the problem of plutocratic influences in democratic politics and international (...)
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  13.  24
    All I Ask of You.Gwen Ottinger - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):112-115.
    Mobilizing Hope asks that we take the eradication of poverty as morally mandatory, that we pursue technological development, and that we act on the belief that it is possible to do both of those things at once. It resolutely does not ask that we redefine prosperity in other-than-economic terms, reconsider the binary between “human” and “nature,” question financialization, colonialism, or other root causes of global poverty, accept qualitatively different lifestyles, or endure painful transitions. While this may seem strategic, I argue (...)
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  14.  31
    Hope Springs Eternal?Steve Vanderheiden - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):125-128.
    As Darrel Moellendorf observes in Mobilizing Hope, climate change and poverty are intertwined in various ways, including the facts that climate impacts threaten to exacerbate global poverty as well...
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  15.  39
    Understanding Feasibility of Climate Change Goals and Actions.Anna Döhlen Wedin - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):48-62.
    Climate change goals and actions are often discussed with reference to their feasibility. However, in the climate change literature, there is no agreed upon understanding of what feasibility means. In this paper, insights from political philosophy are used to address this problem in a two-fold way. First, different uses of the term feasibility in the climate change context are critically analyzed, surfacing problematic uses that can have severe consequences for what goals or actions are considered. Second, the ‘conditional probability account (...)
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  16.  35
    Rationing and Climate Change Mitigation.Nathan Wood, Rob Lawlor & Josie Freear - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 27 (1):1-29.
    In this paper, we argue that rationing has been neglected as a policy option for mitigating climate change. There is a broad scientific consensus that avoiding the most severe impacts of climate change requires a rapid reduction in global emissions. We argue that rationing could help states reduce emissions rapidly and fairly. Our arguments in this paper draw on economic analysis and historical research into rationing in the UK during (and after) the two world wars, highlighting success stories and correcting (...)
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  17. ‘Relational Values’ is Neither a Necessary nor Justified Ethical Concept.Patrik Baard - 2024 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 1 (1).
    ‘Relational value’ (RV) has intuitive credibility due to the shortcomings of existing axiological categories regarding recognizing the ethical relevance of people’s relations to nature. But RV is justified by arguments and analogies that do not hold up to closer scrutiny, which strengthens the assumption that RV is redundant. While RV may provide reasons for ethically considering some relations, much work remains to show that RV is a concept that does something existing axiological concepts cannot, beyond empirically describing relations people have (...)
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