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  1.  7
    Being Without Time: Temporality and the White Gaze.Alfred Frankowski - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1285-1287.
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  2.  1
    Continue the Dialogue – Symposium of Cultivation of Self in East Asian Philosophy of Education.Ruyu Hung - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1169-1170.
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  3.  6
    Integrative Ethical Education: Narvaez’s Project and Xunzi’s Insight.Yen-Yi Lee - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1203-1213.
  4.  7
    Peer Production and Collective Intelligence as the Basis for the Public Digital University.Michael A. Peters & Petar Jandrić - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1271-1284.
    This paper reviews two main historical approaches to creativity: the Romanticist approach, based on the culture of the irrational, and the Enlightenment approach, based on the culture of the objective. It defends a paradigm of creativity as a sum of rich semiotic systems that form the basis of distributed knowledge and learning, reviews historical ideas of the university, and identifies two conflicting mainstream models in regards to understanding of the university as a public good: the ‘Public’ University circa 1960–1980, and (...)
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  5.  4
    Sunken Places and Zones of Non-Being: Black Life in White Imaginaries.Kris F. Sealey - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1290-1292.
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  6.  3
    What Lies Within: Whiteness as the Transcendental Norm.Mark William Westmoreland - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1288-1289.
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  7.  7
    Moral Forfeiture and Racism: Why We Must Talk About Race.George Yancy - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1293-1295.
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  8.  2
    Education and Anti-Poverty: Policy Theory and Strategy of Poverty Alleviation Through Education in China.Xue Eryong & Zhou Xiuping - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (12):1101-1112.
    Countries around the world have adopted different policies to address the global issue of poverty, though their poverty line varies. China has achieved remarkable results in poverty alleviation through education. Aware that poverty eradication must rely on intellectual support, the country has shifted its anti-poverty theory and policy actions from a passive, one-off poverty reduction mode based on ‘blood transfusion’ to an active and sustainable mode aimed at improving the ‘blood making’ capacity of the poor population, namely the Chinese mode. (...)
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  9. Book Review of Chou and Spangler , Chinese Education Models in a Global Age. [REVIEW]Anne Li Jiang - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (12):1157-1160.
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  10.  3
    Learning Stories as Cross-National Policy Borrowing: The Interplay of Globalization and Localization in Preprimary Education in Contemporary China.Minyi Li & Sue Grieshaber - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (12):1124-1132.
    Chinese kindergartens’ over 110 years of adaptation of foreign models is a vivid example of how globalization comes into direct contact with Chinese culture and creates cultural hybridities. Learning Stories as a narrative assessment tool to children’s development from New Zealand, has swept China with the endorsement from the professional organizations and local authorities, especially attracting many followers in Beijing. Based on a two-year participatory action research in Beijing, the article examines Learning Stories as policy borrowing, redesigned as an innovative (...)
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  11. Identity and National Identity.Qiang Liu & David Turner - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (12):1080-1088.
    This article reviews the history of international mobility of students from China to other countries over the century and a half from 1870 to the present day. Different motivations, goals, courses, and knowledge are considered, together with how the purposes of individuals have matched national policy. Implications for the future development in a globalized context are briefly considered.
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  12.  2
    A Critical Scholar’s Journey in China: A Brief Freirean Analysis of Insider–Outsider Tensions.Greg William Misiaszek - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (12):1133-1143.
    As a full-time foreign faculty member in the Chinese Normal university system for the past five years, I analyze the contested terrain of being a critical, Freirean educator/researcher as an insider and outsider of Chinese and Western academic systems and societies overall. This autobiographical analysis is within the contexts of China’s academic focus on raising their global higher education rankings, along with self-reflectivity of my own multiple, often-conflicting identities and Western-centric Orientalism, theorized by Edward Said, in my legitimization of academic (...)
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  13. China’s Double First-Class University Strategy: 双一流.Michael A. Peters & Tina Besley - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (12):1075-1079.
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  14.  2
    Discourse on Nationalism in China’s Traditional Cultural Education: Teachers’ Perspectives.Xi Wang & Ting Wang - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (12):1089-1100.
    Education of Chinese cultural traditions has been endorsed by the central government in Mainland China in recent years. The article presents a study which examined how nationalism advocated in the policy text has been interpreted at the localized level by primary school teachers in Beijing. The study draws on discourse theories as the primary point of reference. The qualitative coding methods and textual analysis were employed to interpret the meanings of 52 interview transcripts of public primary school teachers. The findings (...)
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  15.  8
    Confucian Philosophy and Contemporary Chinese Societal Attitudes Toward People with Disabilities and Inclusive Education.Yuexin Zhang & Sandra Rosen - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (12):1113-1123.
    This article focuses on the Chinese traditional culture, specifically Confucian philosophy, and analyses four core concepts of Confucianism which include ‘ren’, ‘Jun zi’, ‘Tian ming’, and ‘Xiao ti’. Based on these core concepts, this study explores how social attitudes in China toward people with disabilities are formed and influenced by Confucian philosophy, and how they impact the education of people with disabilities. It suggests that the related social attitudes of sympathy, rights awareness, and criteria of success, especially school performance in (...)
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  16. Conceptualizing the Ontology of Higher Education with Chinese Characteristics.Xudong Zhu & Jian Li - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (12):1144-1156.
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  17.  3
    The Incompatibility of Neoliberal University Structures and Interdisciplinary Knowledge: A Feminist Slow Scholarship Critique.Brita Bergland - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1031-1036.
    This paper argues that two fundamentally incompatible shifts are taking place in higher education institutions in the UK, and beyond: Firstly, there is a move towards appreciation of, and focus on, interdisciplinary teaching, learning and research. Secondly, the university institution is undergoing neoliberal reforms, in the spirit of New Public Management. It is argued that the latter leads to an intensification of pressures to specialise into increasingly narrow disciplinary niches, which in terms is detrimental to the possibilities for interdisciplinary cooperation. (...)
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  18. The Incompatibility of Neoliberal University Structures and Interdisciplinary Knowledge: A Feminist Slow Scholarship Critique.Brita Bergland - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1031-1036.
    This paper argues that two fundamentally incompatible shifts are taking place in higher education institutions in the UK, and beyond: Firstly, there is a move towards appreciation of, and focus on, interdisciplinary teaching, learning and research. Secondly, the university institution is undergoing neoliberal reforms, in the spirit of New Public Management. It is argued that the latter leads to an intensification of pressures to specialise into increasingly narrow disciplinary niches, which in terms is detrimental to the possibilities for interdisciplinary cooperation. (...)
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  19. The New Spirit of Capitalism in European Liberal Arts Programs.Jakob Claus, Thomas Meckel & Farina Pätz - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1011-1019.
    The following paper suggests a connection between recent developments in the justification of the capitalist system and contemporary European Liberal Arts programs. By looking at Luc Boltanski’s and Eve Chiapello’s study on The New Spirit Of Capitalism and Gilles Deleuze’s term of societies of control we highlight a pivot within Western societies towards flexibility, creativity and self-fulfillment as essential requirements on the job market. We then link this observation to European Liberal Arts programs and ask to what extent the Liberal (...)
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  20.  6
    The New Spirit of Capitalism in European Liberal Arts Programs.Jakob Claus, Thomas Meckel & Farina Pätz - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1011-1019.
    The following paper suggests a connection between recent developments in the justification of the capitalist system and contemporary European Liberal Arts programs. By looking at Luc Boltanski’s and Eve Chiapello’s study on The New Spirit Of Capitalism and Gilles Deleuze’s term of societies of control we highlight a pivot within Western societies towards flexibility, creativity and self-fulfillment as essential requirements on the job market. We then link this observation to European Liberal Arts programs and ask to what extent the Liberal (...)
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  21.  2
    Towards a University of Halbbildung: How the Neoliberal Mode of Higher Education Governance in Europe is Half-Educating Students for a Misleading Future.Lucas Lundbye Cone - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1020-1030.
    . Towards a university of Halbbildung: How the neoliberal mode of higher education governance in Europe is half-educating students for a misleading future. Educational Philosophy and Theory: Vol. 50, Special Issue of Submissions from European Liberal Education Student Conference, pp. 1020-1030.
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  22.  1
    Evaluating the Liberal Arts Model in the Context of the Dutch University College.Nathan Cooper - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1060-1067.
    The Liberal Arts model of undergraduate education within small, internationally-focused University Colleges is becoming increasingly popular in Europe. This trend is most notable in the Netherlands, where the liberal arts model is acclaimed as filling a gap in Dutch undergraduate education at conventional research universities. This paper explores the status of the Dutch University College as simultaneously continuing the liberal arts tradition of the US, with its civic and pedagogic values, and providing a truly modern education preparing students to find (...)
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  23. Evaluating the Liberal Arts Model in the Context of the Dutch University College.Nathan Cooper - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1060-1067.
    The Liberal Arts model of undergraduate education within small, internationally-focused University Colleges is becoming increasingly popular in Europe. This trend is most notable in the Netherlands, where the liberal arts model is acclaimed as filling a gap in Dutch undergraduate education at conventional research universities. This paper explores the status of the Dutch University College as simultaneously continuing the liberal arts tradition of the US, with its civic and pedagogic values, and providing a truly modern education preparing students to find (...)
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  24.  3
    A Return to Understanding: Making Liberal Education Valuable Again.Clara Haberberger - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1052-1059.
    Critical literature on liberal education since the 1990s discerns two main trends which pose a serious threat to liberal education in the contemporary world. These are, firstly, the trend of liberal arts colleges offering a more professional curriculum and, secondly, the trend among universities and colleges in general to promote values which used to be inherently liberal. The result is that liberal arts colleges risk becoming superfluous as educational institutions, given that they no longer add anything distinctive in today’s society. (...)
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  25.  7
    A Return to Understanding: Making Liberal Education Valuable Again.Clara Haberberger - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1052-1059.
    Critical literature on liberal education since the 1990s discerns two main trends which pose a serious threat to liberal education in the contemporary world. These are, firstly, the trend of liberal arts colleges offering a more professional curriculum and, secondly, the trend among universities and colleges in general to promote values which used to be inherently liberal. The result is that liberal arts colleges risk becoming superfluous as educational institutions, given that they no longer add anything distinctive in today’s society. (...)
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  26.  3
    Towards a University of Halbbildung: How the Neoliberal Mode of Higher Education Governance in Europe is Half-Educating Students for a Misleading Future.Lucas Lundbye Cone - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1020-1030.
    . Towards a university of Halbbildung: How the neoliberal mode of higher education governance in Europe is half-educating students for a misleading future. Educational Philosophy and Theory: Vol. 50, Special Issue of Submissions from European Liberal Education Student Conference, pp. 1020-1030.
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  27.  2
    Truth and Truth-Telling in the Age of Trump.Michael A. Peters - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1001-1007.
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  28.  3
    Truth and Truth-Telling in the Age of Trump.Michael A. Peters - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1001-1007.
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  29.  1
    Economic Precarity, Modern Liberal Arts and Creating a Resilient Graduate.Adam J. Smith - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1037-1044.
    From the perspective of a recent graduate, this article offers a critique of non-STEM higher education in England as unfit for purpose. Whilst universities blindly focus on employability, transferable skills and narrow bands of subject knowledge, the economic world around them has collapsed into absurdity. The graduate today is now faced with economic, social and cultural precarity which is unreflected in the rigid structures and narrow focus of their degree. This article seeks a radical return to the ancient principles of (...)
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  30.  3
    Economic Precarity, Modern Liberal Arts and Creating a Resilient Graduate.Adam J. Smith - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1037-1044.
    From the perspective of a recent graduate, this article offers a critique of non-STEM higher education in England as unfit for purpose. Whilst universities blindly focus on employability, transferable skills and narrow bands of subject knowledge, the economic world around them has collapsed into absurdity. The graduate today is now faced with economic, social and cultural precarity which is unreflected in the rigid structures and narrow focus of their degree. This article seeks a radical return to the ancient principles of (...)
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  31.  2
    Is Twenty-First-Century Liberal Arts Modern?Iain Tidbury - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1045-1051.
    In the first part of this paper I explore a recently conceived notion of a modern liberal arts education which brings the ancient Aristotelian search for first principles into a modern metaphysics of Kant and Hegel. In the second part I examine two ways in which this modern conception of a liberal arts education intervenes in important social and political debates in Western culture. My concluding comments centre on the belief that twenty-first-century liberal arts education needs to provide more resistance (...)
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  32.  2
    Is Twenty-First-Century Liberal Arts Modern?Iain Tidbury - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1045-1051.
    In the first part of this paper I explore a recently conceived notion of a modern liberal arts education which brings the ancient Aristotelian search for first principles into a modern metaphysics of Kant and Hegel. In the second part I examine two ways in which this modern conception of a liberal arts education intervenes in important social and political debates in Western culture. My concluding comments centre on the belief that twenty-first-century liberal arts education needs to provide more resistance (...)
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  33. Green Metaphysics: A Sustainable and Renewable Liberal Arts Education.Nigel Tubbs - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1068-1074.
    Liberal arts education has carried with it the tradition of a virtuous elite. The metaphysics that accompanies this elitism has its own ground in the master and slave relation of Antiquity. But a different metaphysics offers itself now for liberal arts, one which can be argued to be ‘green’, by being sustainable and renewable without the exploitation of the resources and labours of others. It might seem strange to argue that liberal arts should be the natural home of such a (...)
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  34.  1
    Green Metaphysics: A Sustainable and Renewable Liberal Arts Education.Nigel Tubbs - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1068-1074.
    Liberal arts education has carried with it the tradition of a virtuous elite. The metaphysics that accompanies this elitism has its own ground in the master and slave relation of Antiquity. But a different metaphysics offers itself now for liberal arts, one which can be argued to be ‘green’, by being sustainable and renewable without the exploitation of the resources and labours of others. It might seem strange to argue that liberal arts should be the natural home of such a (...)
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  35.  4
    Introduction for Special Issue of Submissions From European Liberal Education Student Conference.Nigel Tubbs & Jakob Tonda Dirksen - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1008-1010.
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  36.  1
    Introduction for Special Issue of Submissions From European Liberal Education Student Conference.Nigel Tubbs & Jakob Tonda Dirksen - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (11):1008-1010.
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  37.  9
    What is Critical About Critical Pedagogy? Conflicting Conceptions of Criticism in the Curriculum.Hanan A. Alexander - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):903-916.
    In this paper, I explore the problems of cultivating a critical attitude in pedagogy given problems with accounts grounded in critical social theory, rational liberalism and pragmatic esthetic theory. I offer instead an alternative account of criticism for education in open, pluralistic, liberal, democratic societies called 'pedagogy of difference' that is grounded in the diversity liberalism of Isaiah Berlin and the dialogical philosophy of Martin Buber. In our current condition in which there is no agreement as to the proper criteria (...)
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  38.  4
    Passive Education.Emile Bojesen - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):928-935.
    This paper does not present an advocacy of a passive education as opposed to an active education nor does it propose that passive education is in any way ‘better’ or more important than active education. Through readings of Maurice Blanchot, Jacques Derrida and B.S. Johnson, and gentle critiques of Jacques Rancière and John Dewey, passive education is instead described and outlined as an education which occurs whether we attempt it or not. As such, the object of critique for this essay (...)
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  39.  12
    Invasion, Alienation, and Imperialist Nostalgia: Overcoming the Necrophilous Nature of Neoliberal Schools.John E. Petrovic & Aaron M. Kuntz - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):957-969.
    The authors present a materialist analysis of the effects of neoliberalism in education. Specifically, they contend that neoliberalism is a form of cultural invasion that begets necrophilia. Neoliberalism is necrophilous in promoting a cultural desire to fix fluid systems and processes. Such desire manufactures both individuals known and culturally felt experiences of alienation which are, it is argued, symptomatic of an imperialist nostalgia that permeates educational policy and practice. The authors point to ‘unschooling in schools’ as a mechanism for resisting (...)
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  40.  3
    What is Education For? An Anthology on Education. [REVIEW]Anthony D. Friend - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):998-999.
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  41. Introduction to the Special Issue.Alex Guilherme - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):900-902.
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  42.  6
    Discussing Education by Means of Metaphors.Alex Guilherme & Ana Lucia Souza de Freitas - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):947-956.
    Metaphors help us understand a concept by resorting to the imaginary because it is sometimes difficult to do so through the use of words alone. Thinkers have made use of metaphors to not only describe ‘falling in love’, ‘the pain of losing someone dear to us’, but also to describe particular concepts both in arts and sciences. In fact, the use of metaphors in some disciplines, particularly the sciences, is now regarded as something essential for the development of the field. (...)
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  43. Discussing Education by Means of Metaphors.Alex Guilherme & Ana Lucia Souza de Freitas - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):947-956.
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  44.  7
    Postdigital Science and Education.Petar Jandrić, Jeremy Knox, Tina Besley, Thomas Ryberg, Juha Suoranta & Sarah Hayes - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):893-899.
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  45.  3
    Contagious Ideas: Vulnerability, Epistemic Injustice and Counter-Terrorism in Education.Aislinn O’Donnell - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):981-997.
    The article addresses the implications of Prevent and Channel for epistemic justice. The first section outlines the background of Prevent. It draws upon Moira Gatens and Genevieve Lloyd’s concept of the collective imaginary, alongside Lorraine Code’s concept of epistemologies of mastery, in order to outline some of the images and imaginaries that inform and orient contemporary counter-terrorist preventative initiatives, in particular those affecting education. Of interest here is the way in which vulnerability is conceptualised in Prevent and Channel, in particular (...)
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  46. Invasion, Alienation, and Imperialist Nostalgia: Overcoming the Necrophilous Nature of Neoliberal Schools.John E. Petrovic & Aaron M. Kuntz - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):957-969.
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  47.  1
    Culturally Reimagining Education: Publicity, Aesthetics and Socially Engaged Art Practice.Sharon Todd - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):970-980.
    This paper sets out to reimagine education through a cultural perspective and explores education as a performative practice that establishes certain borders of ‘public’ belonging. Wide-spread debates about the public dimension of schools and universities have focused on how economic rationales need to be replaced with alternative visions of education. This paper seeks to contribute to this revisioning of the public in education by reclaiming education as a specifically cultural endeavour, one tied to practices that are at once both performative (...)
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  48.  6
    Rethinking Emancipation with Freire and Rancière: A Plea for a Thing-Centred Pedagogy.Joris Vlieghe - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):917-927.
    In this article, I critically engage with a vital assumption behind the work of Paulo Freire, and more generally behind any critical pedagogy, viz. the belief that education is fundamentally about emancipation. My main goal is to conceive of a contemporary critical pedagogy which stays true to the original inspiration of Freire’s work, but which at the same time takes it in a new direction. More precisely, I confront Freire with Jacques Rancière. Not only is the latter’s work on education (...)
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  49.  1
    Institutional Pedagogy for an Autonomous Society: Castoriadis & Lapassade.Sophie Wustefeld - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):936-946.
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  50.  4
    Institutional Pedagogy for an Autonomous Society: Castoriadis & Lapassade.Sophie Wustefeld - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):936-946.
    This article explores how George Lapassade’s institutional pedagogy meets the definition of ‘praxis’ formulated by Cornelius Castoriadis, as the activity creating reflective and deliberative subjects. Lapassade applies Castoriadis’s criticism of bureaucracy to transform the teacher-learners’ relationship and emphasises how self-governance group dynamics among learners facilitates learning in general and access to critical thinking in particular. Castoriadis’s concept of democracy as individual and collective autonomy demands an interpretation of equality as a dynamic process instead of as a state of social relations, (...)
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  51.  1
    Thinking with Spinoza About Education.Elizabeth de Freitas, Sam Sellar & Lars Bang Jensen - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):805-808.
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  52.  6
    Spinoza’s Proposal for a Doctrine of Children’s Education.Cristiano Novaes de Rezende - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):830-838.
    The main objective of this article is to analyze the conceptual connection between the Doctrine of Children’s Education, briefly mentioned in Spinoza’s Tractatus de Intellectus Emendatione, and the concept of emendation present at the very center of this Treatise’s title. A close textual exegesis of the opening paragraphs of TIE reveals why such a doctrine cannot be the ascetic renunciation of the content of ordinary life. We shall see instead that a new institution of life shall be possible only through (...)
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  53.  2
    Imagining Powerful Co-Operative Schools: Theorising Dynamic Co-Operation with Spinoza.Joanna Dennis - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):849-857.
    The recent expansion of the English academies programme has initiated a period of significant change within the state education system. As established administration has been disrupted, new providers from business and philanthropy have entered the sector with a range of approaches to transform schools. This paper examines the development of co-operative schools, which are positioned as an ‘ethical alternative’ within the system and have proved popular with teachers and parents. Using a theory of co-operative power drawn from the philosophy of (...)
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  54. Afterword: Practical and Impractical Philosophies; Intuition and Reason.Anna Hickey-Moody - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):888-891.
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  55.  7
    Spinoza, Deep Ecology and Education Informed by a Human Sensibility.Lesley Le Grange - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):878-887.
    This article explores the influence of Spinozism on the deep ecology movement and on new materialism. It questions the stance of supporters of the DEM because their ecosophies unwittingly anthropomorphise the more-than-human-world. It suggests that instead of humanising the ‘natural’ world, morality should be naturalised, that is, that the object of human expression of ethics should be the more-than-human world. Moreover, the article discusses Deleuze’s Spinozism that informs new materialism and argues that stripping the human of its ontological privilege does (...)
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  56.  7
    Ideology and the ‘Multitude of the Classroom’: Spinoza and Althusser at School.Ian Leask - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):858-867.
    This paper approaches the question of Spinoza and education via the work of Louis Althusser. One important aim is to show how Spinoza’s description of the imagination underpins Althusser’s description of the ideological ‘infrastructure’ of educational practices and institutions. To achieve this, I begin by addressing Spinoza’s treatment of the physiological foundation of the imagination: by showing that the realm of ‘individual consciousness’ is more like the effect of an anonymous field, or process, Spinoza, we see, becomes a kind of (...)
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  57.  2
    Spinoza, Experimentation and Education: How Things Teach Us.Aislinn O’Donnell - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):819-829.
    This essay focuses on three primary issues i. The conceptual resources offered by Spinoza to challenge the idealism and perfectionism underpinning much educational theory and dominant educational imaginaries; ii. His descriptions of a non-ideal, practical and systematic approach to developing understanding that could be applied to educational theorising and practice; and iii. The potential for a different vision of education premised upon understanding the human as simply a part of nature. Decentring the human and treating affective and mental life as (...)
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  58.  5
    Thinking with Spinoza About ‘Hands-on’ Learning.Wolff-Michael Roth - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):839-848.
    Despite its advanced age of about 375 years, the mind–body problem is alive and well, in part because it is anchored so well institutionally in schools and in research. This continued presence is astonishing in the light of the fact that the seed for its solution, sown in Spinoza’s Ethics, is almost as old. The solution rests on the position that there is only one substance, which, invisible, manifests itself in two attributes, thought and extension. By thinking with Spinoza, especially (...)
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  59.  9
    Honors and Theater: Spinoza’s Pedagogical Experience and His Relation to F. Van den Enden.Maxime Rovere - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):809-818.
    Franciscus Van den Enden is commonly considered as the man who taught Latin to B. de Spinoza. It is unknown if he actually taught him something else, but we do know he used a pedagogy of his own and made the young philosopher aware of the importance of pedagogical issues. The present article helps to document their relationship from a historical and theoretical perspective, by clarifying Van den Enden’s ideas on a most debated subject: the use of honorary titles to (...)
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  60.  4
    The Joy of Learning: Feminist Materialist Pedagogies and the Freedom of Education.Maria Tamboukou - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (9):868-877.
    In this article, I trace lines of materialist pedagogies in the history of women workers’ education following feminist interpretations of Spinoza’s assemblage of joyful affects. More particularly, I focus on the notions of laetitia [joy], gaudium [gladness] and hilaritas [cheerfulness] as entanglements of joy and trace their expression in practices and discourses inscribed in archival documents that I have reassembled around the theme of women workers’ education. My reading of Ethics follows a range of feminist thinkers that have engaged with (...)
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  61.  23
    An Exploration of Naquib Al-Attas’ Theory of Islamic Education as Ta’Dīb as an ‘Indigenous’ Educational Philosophy.Farah Ahmed - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):786-794.
    This paper explores the ‘indigenous’ philosophy of education of Syed Muhammad Naquib al-Attas, a Malay-Muslim scholar who’s theoretical work culminated in the establishment of a counter-colonial higher education institution. Through presenting al-Attas’ life and philosophy and by exploring the arguments of his critics, I aim to shed light on the challenges and paradoxes faced by indigenous academics working at the interface of philosophy and education.
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  62. An Exploration of Naquib Al-Attas’ Theory of Islamic Education as Ta’Dīb as an ‘Indigenous’ Educational Philosophy.Farah Ahmed - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):786-794.
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  63.  2
    Iran’s Implicit Philosophy of Education.Khosrow Bagheri Noaparast - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):776-785.
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  64. In Search of Samoan Research Approaches to Education: Tofā’a’Anolasi and the Foucauldian Tool Box.Akata Sisigafu’Aapulematumua Galuvao - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):747-757.
    This article introduces Tofā’a’anolasi, a novel Samoan research framework created by drawing on the work of other Samoan and Pacific education researchers, in combination with adapting the ‘Foucauldian tool box’ to use for research carried out from a Samoan perspective. The article starts with an account and explanation of the process of developing and of naming Tofā’a’anolasi as a Samoan form of Critical Discourse Analysis. Following this is a discussion of the features of Tofā’a’anolasi and the theoretical underpinnings that explain (...)
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  65. In Search of Samoan Research Approaches to Education: Tofā’a’Anolasi and the Foucauldian Tool Box.Akata Sisigafu’Aapulematumua Galuvao - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):747-757.
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  66.  1
    Dewey Called Them Utopians, I Call Them Ancestors.Hollie A. Kulago - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):758-766.
    In this article, I will describe how the Utopians whom John Dewey once referenced are possibly the ancestors of Indigenous peoples, in this case, ancestors of the Diné. I will describe a Diné philosophy of education through the Kinaałdá ceremony which was the first ceremony created by the Holy People of the Diné to ensure the survival of the people. I frame this ceremony as an educational experience that illuminates the similarities between the Diné and Utopian philosophies of education. It (...)
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  67.  1
    Dewey Called Them Utopians, I Call Them Ancestors.Hollie A. Kulago - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):758-766.
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  68.  8
    Exploring Whakaaro: A Way of Responsive Thinking in Maori Research.Carl Mika & Kim Southey - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):795-803.
    The experience of researching as a Māori student within academia will often raise questions about how and whether the student’s research privileges Māori world views and articulates culturally specific epistemologies. This study offers some theorising, from the perspectives of a Maori doctoral student and her Maori supervisor, on the metaphysical nature of research for Maori. It emphasises that there is a space for speculative, creative and responsive thinking as a central method in the student’s doctoral research and describes how access (...)
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  69.  2
    Exploring Whakaaro: A Way of Responsive Thinking in Maori Research.Carl Mika & Kim Southey - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):795-803.
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  70.  4
    What is Philosophy for Indigenous People, in Relation to Education?Carl Mika & Georgina Stewart - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):744-746.
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  71.  4
    What is Indigenous Research in Philosophy of Education? And What is PESA, From an Indigenous Perspective?Carl Mika, Georgina Stewart, Ka’imi Watson, Keola Silva, Brian Martin, Jacoba Matapo & Akata Galuvao - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):733-739.
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  72.  14
    Iran’s Implicit Philosophy of Education.Khosrow Bagheri Noaparast - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):776-785.
    This paper aims to extract Iran’s philosophy of education from two sources of the constitution and the course of practice in educational institutions. Regarding the first source, it is argued that parallel to the two main threads of the constitution, Iran’s main elements of philosophy of education are expected to be derived from; Islam and democracy. The challenge in front of this feature of Iran’s implicit philosophy of education refers to the seemingly contradictory relation between the two components of Islam (...)
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  73.  1
    What Does ‘Indigenous’ Mean, for Me?Georgina Stewart - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):740-743.
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  74.  2
    From Both Sides of the Indigenous-Settler Hyphen in Aotearoa New Zealand.Georgina Stewart - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):767-775.
    The idea of the ‘intercultural hyphen’ is likened to a gap or bridge between ethnic groups, created from the ongoing intertwining of sociopolitical and intellectual histories. This ‘gap or bridge’ wording captures the paradoxical nature of the intercultural space, for which the ‘hyphen’ is a shorthand symbol or sign. There are options on either side to engage or disengage across the intercultural space represented by the hyphen—but how, and with what results? In Aotearoa New Zealand, tensions invoked by the indigenous-settler (...)
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  75.  2
    From Both Sides of the Indigenous-Settler Hyphen in Aotearoa New Zealand.Georgina Stewart - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):767-775.
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  76.  7
    Purification Through Emotions: The Role of Shame in Plato’s Sophist 230b4–E5.Laura Candiotto - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):576-585.
    This article proposes an analysis of Plato’s Sophist that underlines the bond between the logical and the emotional components of the Socratic elenchus, with the aim of depicting the social valence of this philosophical practice. The use of emotions characterizing the ‘elenctic’ method described by Plato is crucial in influencing the audience and is introduced at the very moment in which the interlocutor attempts to protect his social image by concealing his shame at being refuted. The audience, thanks to Plato’s (...)
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  77.  3
    The Existential Concern of the Humanities R.S. Peters’ Justification of Liberal Education.Stefaan E. Cuypers - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):702-711.
    Richard Stanley Peters was one of the founding fathers of analytic philosophy of education in the twentieth century. After reviewing Peters’ disentanglement of the ambiguities of liberal education, I reconstruct his view on the status and the existential foundations of the humanities. What emerges from my reconstruction is an original justificatory argument for the value of liberal education as general education in the sense of initiation into the heritage of the humanities. To close, I evaluate the scope and power of (...)
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  78.  3
    Paideia Platonikê: Does the Later Platonist Programme of Education Retain Any Validity Today?John Dillon - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):597-604.
    During the Middle Platonic period, from the second-century CE on, and in a more elaborately structured way from the time of Iamblichus on, the Platonist Schools of later antiquity took their students through a fixed sequence of Platonic dialogues, beginning with the Alcibiades I, concerned as it was with the theme of self-knowledge, and ending—at least in the later period—with the Timaeus and Parmenides, representing the two ‘pinnacles’ of Platonic philosophy, concerned with the physical and intelligible realms, respectively. There seems (...)
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  79.  4
    Rebirth of Paideia: Ultimacy and the Game of Games.Jonathan Doner - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):719-727.
    Plato’s philosophy of paideia concerns the life-long growth toward areté, excellence, in body, mind, and spirit. Implementation of this philosophy in modern times is challenged by many societal conditions, especially relativism, plurality, and secularity. This paper discusses an approach that advocates individualized paideia. In its most simple and direct manifestation, individualized paideia can be supported and developed by the person’s participation in a class of games exemplified by the Tibetan game Rebirth. An analysis of their structure and dynamics indicates that (...)
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  80.  6
    Mania and Knowledge. From the Sting of the Gods to Socrates as Educational Gadfly.Michael Erler - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):565-575.
    In Plato’s Phaedrus, Socrates asserts that madness is a good thing if it comes from the gods, and demonstrates this using the example of love. Eroticism becomes thereby philosophy, the lover a philosopher, with Plato’s Socrates serving as prototype. The question remains, however, how madness can be reconciled with a philosophical search for truth which relies entirely on rationality. This question must be considered within the context of the growing antagonism between irrationality and rationality, enlightenment and counter-enlightenment, cultic ritual and (...)
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  81.  5
    Philosophy of Education in Early Fichte.Tamás Hankovszky - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):631-639.
    According to Fichte’s early science of knowledge, man is a free and independent being who becomes somebody not through the power of nature, by developing his innate skills and abilities, or through external influence, but by his own power. Since the essence of human beings is I-hood, the individual, having defeated the not-I or nature living in him, has to strive towards the absolute I, which is nothing else but the being created by himself. This process is Bildung, the details (...)
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  82.  5
    Bild, Bildung and the ‘Romance of the Soul’: Reflections Upon the Image of Meister Eckhart.Douglas Hedley - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):614-620.
    In this article, the Bild or image of the sculptor used by Plotinus and adapted by his Christian follower Meister Eckhart forms the basis of a reflection on the religious or otherworldly dimension in ethics and on the relationship of esthetics, morality, and religion. The image of the sculptor who chips away at his sculpture exemplifies the relationship of the individual to its divine archetype. Such knowledge involves transformation of the knower, a turning back of the image to the archetype, (...)
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  83.  6
    Werner Jaeger’s Paideia and His ‘Third Humanism’.Christoph Horn - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):682-691.
    Werner Jaeger was at his time the most brilliant and the most influential German classicist. His most important project was a tripartite study that he finally published under the title of Paideia. Die Formung des griechischen Menschen. Paideia was much more than a detailed scholarly book on pedagogy in the ancient world. It was an attempt to interpret the history of ancient thought—from Homeric epics to Attic tragedy and Platonic philosophy—as rooted in the intention to educate human beings. And it (...)
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  84.  4
    Paideia, Progress, Puzzlement.Herbert Hrachovec - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):712-718.
    Platonic paideia is a mainstream concept in traditional philosophy and humanistic circles generally. It is closely connected with social progress brought about by the dynamics of enlightenment and self-fulfillment, symbolized by the allegory of the cave. The main contention of this paper is that the philosophical grammar of this simile is more precarious than is often recognized. Plato’s apparently intuitive narrative blends together two features that do not easily mix, namely explicit, categorical dualisms, and temporal processes of development. The second (...)
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  85.  8
    Radicalising Philosophy of Education—The Case of Jean-Francois Lyotard.Jones Irwin - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):692-701.
    The origins of philosophy of education as a discipline are relatively late, and can be traced in the Anglo-American academic world from the 1960s and a specific emphasis on conceptual problems deriving from the analytical tradition of philosophy. In more recent years, however, there has been a notable ‘Continentalist’ turn in the discipline, leading to a re-evaluation of key texts and philosophers from the French and German traditions and their relation to the discourse of education. One paradigmatic example here is (...)
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  86. Kabbalah, Education, and Prayer: Jewish Learning in the Seventeenth Century.Gerold Necker - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):621-630.
    In the seventeenth century, the Jewish mystical tradition which is known as Kabbalah was integrated into the curriculum of studying the Hebrew Bible and the Talmud. Kabbalah became popular in these times in the wake of the dissemination of Isaac Luria’s teachings, in particular within the Jewish communities in Prague and Amsterdam, where members of the Horowitz family took a leading role. Kabbalistic psychology was applied to the whole Jewish lifestyle then, and to the understanding of Jewish tradition. Kabbalistic intentions (...)
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  87.  8
    Deep Learning, Education and the Final Stage of Automation.Michael A. Peters - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):549-553.
  88.  1
    Friedrich Nietzsche in Basel: An Apology for Classical Studies.Carlotta Santini - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):672-681.
    Alongside his work as a professor of Greek Language and Literature at the University of Basel, Friedrich Nietzsche reflected on the value of classical studies in contemporary nineteenth-century society, starting with a self-analysis of his own classical training and position as a philologist and teacher. Contrary to his well-known aversion to classical philology, a science conceived as being an end in itself, aimed at mere erudite complacency, I highlight Nietzsche’s defence of the system of Classical studies, and of the education (...)
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  89.  1
    Education is Mutual: In Search of the Ideal Interpretation.Vladimir Stoupel & Judith Ingolfsson - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):728-732.
    The question that should be posed at this time is the following: Does every artist have an audience? It is not so long since the era of totalitarian regimes, when many composers had almost no access or nearly no access to an audience. But ideally, every composition should have a chance to be presented to a wider public. At that moment, the composition is entirely dependent on its interpretation, which determines to what extent the audience will accept the unknown work. (...)
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  90.  4
    Hölderlin’s Idea of ‘Bildungstrieb’: A Model From Yesteryear?Violetta L. Waibel - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):640-651.
    The term Bildungstrieb, which was used toward the end of the eighteenth century by thinkers like Johann Gottfried Herder, Immanuel Kant, or Friedrich Schiller, but which is obsolete in today’s vernacular, was of great importance for Friedrich Hölderlin. In this article, I explore the historical roots of this concept in the biology of the time, which was then still searching for the right concepts to describe the organic. Bildungstrieb is found in Kant’s teleology in the Critique of Judgment, where Kant (...)
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  91.  7
    “Πᾶσα Μὲν Ἡ Ποίησις Τῷ Ὁμήρῳ Ἀρετῆς Ἐστιν Ἔπαινος”: Greek Poetry and Paideia in the Homiletic Tradition of Basil.Sarah Klitenic Wear - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):605-613.
    Based on a reading of Basil’s Ad Adulescentes and the epistles, it is clear that Basil finds moral value in Homer and Hesiod. The trickier issue is to what extent Basil uses Homer and Hesiod in his homilies. It seems that Basil does not abandon his respect for the utility of Hellenic paideia for the Christian in his homilies. Rather, he must approach Homer and Hesiod more gingerly because he fears that his uncultivated audience will have difficulty with reading texts (...)
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  92.  3
    Bildung and the Historical and Genealogical Critique of Contemporary Culture: Wilhelm von Humboldt’s Neo-Humanistic Theory of Bildung and Nietzsche’s Critique of Neo-Humanistic Ideas in Classical Philology and Education.Tomislav Zelić - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):662-671.
    . Bildung and the historical and genealogical critique of contemporary culture: Wilhelm von Humboldt’s neo-humanistic theory of Bildung and Nietzsche’s critique of neo-humanistic ideas in classical philology and education. Educational Philosophy and Theory: Vol. 50, Bildung and paideia. Philosophical models of education, pp. 662-671.
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  93.  3
    Hegel’s Concept of Education From the Point of View of His Idea of ‘Second Nature’.Jure Zovko - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):652-661.
    This article explores Hegels concept of education within the context of his idea of ‘second nature’. Hegel believes that institutional life forms, which have been formed through education, culture, technical and social progress, constitute the ‘second nature’ of human beings. The immediacy of institutional forms which act as humans’ ‘second nature’ is the product of social and cultural mediation. The phenomenon of morality is here of central importance, because through morality the natural arbitrariness of the will is transformed and the (...)
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  94.  4
    Worldly and Otherworldly Virtue: Likeness to God as Educational Ideal in Plato, Plotinus, and Today.Marie-Élise Zovko - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):586-596.
    In Plato, ‘Becoming like God’ constitutes the telos of the philosophical life. Our ‘likeness to God’ is rooted in the relationship of the divine paradeigma to its image established in the generation of the Cosmos. This relationship makes knowledge and virtue possible, and informs Plato’s theory of education. Related concepts preexist in Judeo-Christian and other traditions and continue to inform our thought on moral and ethical issues, particularly as regards our understanding of what it means to be human. From the (...)
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  95.  3
    Humanism Vs. Competency: Traditional and Contemporary Models of Education.Marie-Élise Zovko & John Dillon - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):554-564.
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  96.  8
    Engagement in Dialogue: Tracing Our Connections or Speaking Across the Space Between?Leslie Maurice Alford - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):448-454.
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  97.  4
    On Engaging with Others: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Problems with Deeply Held Beliefs.Tracy Bowell - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):478-488.
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  98.  2
    Teachers’ Cultural Autobiography as Means of Civic Professional Engagement.Mihaela Enache - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):455-459.
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  99.  23
    Toward an Educational Sphereology: Air, Wind, and Materialist Pedagogy.Derek R. Ford & Weili Zhao - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):528-537.
    It’s not uncommon for people to make reference to atmospheres, including in relationship with educational spaces. In this article, we investigate educational atmospheres by turning to Western and Chinese literature on the air and wind. We pursue this task in three phases. First, we examine the Western literature to see the possible strings of thought that would help us reinvigorate the element of air/atmosphere as a foundational component of an educational sphere. Second, we historicize the Chinese notion of wind as (...)
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  100.  3
    How to Do Things with Words: Speech Acts in Education.Renia Gasparatou - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):510-518.
    Originating from philosophy and science, many different ideas have made their way into educational policies. Educational policies often take such ideas completely out of context, and enforce them as general norms to every aspect of education; even opposing ideals make their way into school’s curricula, teaching techniques, assignments, and procedures. Meanwhile, inside the actual classrooms, teachers and students are left in limbo, trying to comply with, techniques, evaluation forms and a growing technical educational vocabulary. Here I would like to propose (...)
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  101.  14
    Teaching Critical Thinking: The Struggle Against Dogmatism.Cristiane Maria Cornelia Gottschalk - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):469-477.
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  102.  7
    The Teacher is a Learner: Dewey on Aims in Education.Atli Harðarson - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):538-547.
    In Chapter VIII of Democracy and Education, Dewey objects to all three of the following propositions: education serves predefined aims; Education serves aims that are external to the process of education; and Education serves aims that are imposed by authority. From the vantage point of policy-makers and authors of curriculum guides, these three propositions seem plausible, even self-evident. In this paper, I set forth a critical interpretation and evaluation of Dewey’s objections to them and argue that he saw the aims (...)
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  103.  2
    The Juxtaposition of Māori Words with English Concepts. ‘Hauora, Well-Being’ as Philosophy.Sharyn Heaton - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):460-468.
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  104.  8
    ‘The Best Education Ever’: Trumpism, Brexit, and New Social Learning.Liz Jackson - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):441-443.
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  105.  7
    Social Inclusion and Active Citizenship Under the Prism of Neoliberalism: A Critical Analysis of the European Union’s Discourse of Lifelong Learning.Angeliki Mikelatou & Eugenia Arvanitis - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):499-509.
    The aim of this article is to investigate the impact neoliberalism has in shaping the discourse of the European Union’s policy of Lifelong Learning. The literature review initially presents the theoretical framework of neoliberalism as the dominant ideological and economic paradigm of our time. Thereafter, it takes a view on how neoliberalism perceives the four objectives of the European Union’s Lifelong Learning policy, namely employability/adaptability, personal fulfillment, social inclusion, and active citizenship. Through the analysis of European Commission’s policy documents on (...)
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  106.  7
    Education as Philosophies of Engagement.Michael A. Peters, Tina Besley & Jayne White - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):444-447.
    This is Introduction to the PESA conference 2014 held in Hamilton, NZ, is devoted to the conference theme of ‘Education as philosophies of engagement’. We provide a brief analysis of the modern history of ‘philosophies of engagement’ since the Second World War examining the notion of socially responsible writing and teaching.
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  107.  4
    On Being Musical: Education Towards Inclusion.Eve Ruddock - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):489-498.
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  108.  7
    In the Wake of the Quake: Teaching the Emergency.Sean Sturm & Stephen Turner - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):519-527.
    The university today finds itself in a global state of emergency, at once financial, military and ecological. Teaching must assume this emergency as premise and responsibility: it must consider the grounds of the classroom, both figurative and literal, and generate emergent lines of inquiry that address the pressing global and local situation. For us, that means that teaching must take the university’s grounds of supposedly universal knowledge to be constitutively unstable and to require a reflexive teaching method that puts in (...)
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  109.  6
    Recycling Piaget: Posthumanism and Making Children’s Knowledge Matter.Teresa K. Aslanian - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):417-427.
    A growing body of research incorporates children’s perspectives into the research process. If we are to take children’s perspectives seriously in education research, research methodologies must be capable of addressing issues that matter to children. This article engages in a theoretical discussion that considers how a posthuman research methodology can support such an effort. Piaget’s early and lesser known qualitative studies on children’s conception of the world are re-read along with Karen Barad’s posthuman theory, using Catherine Malabou’s concept of plasticity. (...)
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  110.  17
    John Dewey’s Conception of Education: Finding Common Ground with R. S. Peters and Paulo Freire.Kelvin Beckett - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):380-389.
    John Dewey adopted a child-centered point of view to illuminate aspects of education he believed teacher-centered educators were neglecting, but he did so self-consciously and self-critically, because he also believed that ‘a new order of conceptions leading to new modes of practice’ was needed. Dewey introduced his new conceptions in The Child and the Curriculum and later and more fully in Democracy and Education. Teachers at his Laboratory School in Chicago developed the new modes of practice. In this article, I (...)
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  111.  1
    Where Neuroscience and Education Meet: Can Emergentism Successfully Occupy the Middle Ground Between Mind and Body?John Clark - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):404-416.
    Increasingly, connections are being made between neuroscience and education. At their interface is the attempt to ‘bridge the gap between conscious minds and living brains’. All too often, the two sides pursue a reductionist strategy of excluding the other. A middle way, promoted by Sankey in the context of values education, is emergentism: our conscious mental states are the product of brain processes but are not reducible to them. This paper outlines Sankey’s emergentist position and raises two objections: What are (...)
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  112.  3
    The Contribution of Aboriginal Epistemologies to Mathematics Education in Australia: Exploring the Silences.Amber Hughes & Ron Laura - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):338-348.
    Epistemology is a conceptual template for how we think about the world, and the study of how we come to know the world around us. The world does not dictate unequivocally how to interpret it. This article will explore this position on the fluidity of epistemic constructs through two prominent philosophical perspectives, those being derived from the works of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Michael Foucault, respectively. These insights will be used to more deeply unfold the current situation for Aboriginal students within (...)
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  113.  1
    Where Are the Grounds for Grounded Theory? A Troubled Empirical Methodology Meets Wittgenstein.Fiona James - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):369-379.
    This article provides a critical exposition of the epistemological underpinnings of a recent redevelopment of Grounded Theory methodology, ‘Constructivist’ GT. Although proffered as freed from the ‘objectivist’ tenets of the original version, critical examination exposes the essentialism threaded through its integral analytic practices. Movement towards a position critical of an external referent, discernible within Wittgenstein’s later works, is the apparent target of Constructivist GT. However, despite its championing of indeterminate, multiple meanings, the notion of correspondence to the world, discernible within (...)
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  114.  3
    The Matter of Silence in Early Childhood Bilingual Education.Anna Martín-Bylund - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):349-358.
    The relationship between silence as non-speech and bilingualism in early childhood education is intricate. This article maps this relationship with the help of diverse theoretical entrances to a video-recorded everyday episode from a bilingual preschool in Sweden. Though this, three alternative readings of silence are produced. Thinking with Deleuzian philosophy, the aim is to consider how the different readings of silence require different understandings of both time and language and allow different bilingual child subjectivities. The different readings present silence as (...)
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  115.  3
    Iqbal- Education and Cultivation of Self: A Way Forward for Muslims of the Subcontinent.Sarwat Nauman - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):326-337.
    Whether all educationists were philosophers or not, one thing is clear – that all philosophers were educationists – directly or indirectly. May it be Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau or Dewey, they all came up with the notion that to bring about any change at a greater level in a society, change in its educational system is fundamental. Dr. Mohammad Allama Iqbal, though was a philosopher and a poet, also touched the very core of the problems existing in the Muslim societies of (...)
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  116. Michel Foucault’s Limit-Experience Limited.Marianna Papastephanou - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):390-403.
    Educational philosophy has not discussed Foucault’s publications on the Iranian Revolution and the related controversy. Foucauldian concepts are applied to education, though his only writings which ‘sidetracked’ him from exploring power within the state, namely, his journalistic accounts of his visits to Iran, remain unexplored in our field. Against moralist accusations of Foucault’s views on Iran as ‘singularly uncritical’, and beyond standard postcolonial charges of Foucault with exoticism and orientalism, I examine how the writings in question reveal ambivalences and limits (...)
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  117.  10
    The End of Neoliberal Globalisation and the Rise of Authoritarian Populism.Michael A. Peters - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):323-325.
  118. ‘Language Must Be Raked’: Experience, Race, and the Pressure of Air.Paul Standish - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):428-440.
    This article begins by clarifying the notion of what Stanley Cavell has called ‘Emersonian moral perfectionism.’ It goes on to explore this through close analysis of aspects of Emerson’s essay ‘Experience,’ in which ideas of trying or attempting or experimenting bring out the intimate relation between perfectionism and styles of writing. ‘Where do we find ourselves?’ Emerson asks, and the answer is to be found in part in what we write and what we say, injecting a new sense of possibility (...)
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  119.  4
    Democratic Communities of Inquiry: Creating Opportunities to Develop Citizenship.Luke Zaphir - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (4):359-368.
    One of the most significant obstacles to inquiry and deliberation is citizenship education. There are few mechanisms for the development of citizens’ democratic character within most societies, and greater opportunities need to be made to ensure our democracies are epistemically justifiable. The character and quality of citizens’ interactions are a crucial aspect for any democracy; their engagement make a significant difference between a deliberative society and an electoral oligarchy. I contend that through demarchic procedures, citizens are subject to collective learning (...)
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  120.  19
    The Socratic Method, Defeasibility, and Doxastic Responsibility.Peter Boghossian & James Lindsay - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):244-253.
    There is an extensive body of philosophical, educational, and popular literature explaining Socratic pedagogy’s epistemological and educational ambitions. However, there is virtually no literature clarifying the relationship between Socratic method and doxastic responsibility. This article fills that gap in the literature by arguing that the Socratic method models many of the features of an ideally doxastically responsible agent. It ties a robust notion of doxastic responsibility to the Socratic method by showing how using defeaters to undermine participants’ knowledge claims can (...)
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  121.  12
    Identity Politics, the Ethos of Vulnerability, and Education.Kristiina Brunila & Leena-Maija Rossi - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):287-298.
    In this article, identity politics is understood as a form of politics stressing collective but malleable group identities as the basis of political action. This notion of identity politics also allows thinking of identity as intersectional. The focus of this article, and a problem related to identity politics, is that when discussed in the context of the neoliberal order, identity politics has a tendency to become harnessed by the ethos of vulnerability. Some implications of the ‘vulnerabilizisation’ are considered in the (...)
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  122.  6
    Embodying Skilful Performance: Co-Constituting Body and World in Biotechnology.Gloria Dall’Alba, Jörgen Sandberg & Ravinder Kaur Sidhu - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):270-286.
    This article offers a philosophical-empirical account of embodied skilful performance in the practice of plant biotechnology. Drawing on the work of Merleau-Ponty and others, we elaborate how skilful performance emerges from and through reciprocal relations encompassing the body-in-the-world and the world-in-the-body. The contribution of this article lies in offering an account of skilful performance that is attentive to a perceiving, motile, feeling body entwined with world. In genetically modifying plants, scientists direct their senses of touch and vision to manipulating plant (...)
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  123.  6
    Has the Shift to Overworked and Underpaid Adjunct Faculty Helped Education Outcomes?Elvira Nica - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):213-216.
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  124.  9
    The Adaptive Professional: Teachers, School Leaders and Ethical-Governmental Practices of Formation.Peter C. O’Brien - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):229-243.
    This article analyses the relations that teachers and school leaders establish with themselves and with others—especially those who would seek to govern them—through the professional and personal–professional activities that increasingly accompany pedagogical and administrative practice today. Specifically, the article seeks to analyse the conditions under which such ‘ethical-governmental’ relations have become possible and to clarify the lines of power, truth and ethics that are in play within them. In this way, it is argued, their intelligibility may be recovered; their contingencies (...)
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  125.  2
    Embracing the Humanistic Vision: Recurrent Themes in Peter Roberts’ Recent Writings.James Reveley - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):312-321.
    Running like a leitmotif through Peter Roberts’ recently published philosophico-educational writings there is a humanistic thread, which this article picks out. In order to ascertain the quality of this humanism, Roberts is positioned in relation to a pair of extant humanisms: radical and integral. Points of comparability and contrast are identified in several of the writer’s genre-crossing essays. These texts, it is argued, rectify deficiencies in how the two humanisms envision alternatives to capitalism. Roberts skilfully teases out the non-obvious futurological (...)
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  126.  83
    Making Sense in Education: Deleuze on Thinking Against Common Sense.Itay Snir - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):299-311.
    According to a widespread view, one of the most important roles of education is the nurturing of common sense. In this article I turn to Gilles Deleuze’s concept of sense to develop a contrary view of education—one that views education as a radical challenge to common sense. The discussion will centre on the relation of sense and common sense to thinking. Although adherents of common sense refer to it as the basis of all thought and appeal to critical thinking as (...)
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  127.  3
    Disciplinarity and Normative Education.Peter Strandbrink - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):254-269.
    Drawing on recent interdisciplinary, multidimensional research on civic and religious education in northern Europe, this article explores disciplinary epistemological economies in an era of mounting discontent with the narrowness of mono-disciplinary analyses of complex social and educational issues. It is argued in the article that under conditions of sufficient world complexity, interdisciplinarity provides for a more cogent scholarly approach to educational structures and phenomena than either of the logics of mono-, multi- and transdisciplinarity—the main extant alternatives. It is shown in (...)
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  128.  6
    Embodied Cognition and Curriculum Construction.Mei-Qian Wang & Xu-Dong Zheng - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):217-228.
    The disembodiment of cognitive science has resulted in curricula with disembodied concepts and practice. The emergence of the embodied cognitive science provoked public reflections on the nature of the curriculum. This has elevated the body from the ‘peripheral’ position to the ‘central’ position, acting as the subject in action and becoming the bridge to experience transformations. Meanwhile, the nurturing role of the environment for the mind is attracting increasingly more attention, and the environment, the body, and the mind jointly constitute (...)
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  129.  7
    The Role of Trust in Reflective Practice.Leon Benade - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):123-132.
    Trust, as a philosophical concept in education, seems largely taken for granted, either because it is embedded in other discourses, or is self-evidently assumed to be one on which there is general agreement and understanding. Its associated notions, such as confidence and belief, have counters in such concepts as disappointment and betrayal. These various notions come to the fore in interpersonal relations that require openness and self-critique. Critically reflective practice in professional teaching contexts is one such example, where openness means (...)
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  130.  7
    Trust as a Virtue in Education.Laura D’Olimpio - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):193-202.
    As social and political beings, we are able to flourish only if we collaborate with others. Trust, understood as a virtue, incorporates appropriate rational emotional dispositions such as compassion as well as action that is contextual, situated in a time and place. We judge responses as appropriate and characters as trustworthy or untrustworthy based on these factors. To be considered worthy of trust, as an individual or an institution, one must do the right thing at the right time for the (...)
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  131.  6
    Trust as a Virtue in Education.Laura D’Olimpio - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):193-202.
    As social and political beings, we are able to flourish only if we collaborate with others. Trust, understood as a virtue, incorporates appropriate rational emotional dispositions such as compassion as well as action that is contextual, situated in a time and place. We judge responses as appropriate and characters as trustworthy or untrustworthy based on these factors. To be considered worthy of trust, as an individual or an institution, one must do the right thing at the right time for the (...)
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  132.  7
    Trust and the Community of Inquiry.Haynes Felicity - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):144-151.
    This article investigates the place of trust in learning relations in the classroom, not only between teacher and student, but also between student and student. To do this, it will first examine a pedagogy called community of inquiry, espoused by John Dewey and used in most Philosophy for Children courses in Australia. It will then consider what different forms of trust are involved in other power relations in the classroom, particularly the rational structuralism of R.S Peters, or the experiential philosophy (...)
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  133.  11
    Trust and Fiduciary Relationships in Education: What Happens When Trust is Breached?Elizabeth Mary Grierson - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):203-211.
    This paper examines trust as a fundamental aspect of fiduciary relationships in education. The specific relationship under examination is that of academic employee and university employer. Both have the value of trust assigned to them as an implicit part of their social and professional contract. The setting is Australia, but the principles apply to any democratic jurisdiction and educational level or location, where fiduciary principles are a pre-condition for healthy and trustworthy working relationships. The paper firstly discusses the meaning and (...)
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  134.  8
    The Role of Trust in the Teaching of History.Bruce Haynes - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):174-182.
    This article is an initial exploration of possibilities opened up by considering trust relations as central to the teaching of history in schools. It is an extension of an investigation into epistemological problems to see whether ‘trust’ is a more fruitful concept to use than ‘truth’ in dealing with those problems and is based on an assumption that trust is more than a moral notion. In recent times, the mining industry has developed the concept of ‘a social license to operate’ (...)
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  135.  5
    Trust and Schooling.Bruce Haynes - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):119-122.
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  136.  7
    Trust and Critical Thinking.John Kleinig - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):133-143.
    This article discusses the tension between trust, as an expression of interpersonal commitment, and critical thinking, which includes a demand for reasons. It explores the importance of each for individual flourishing, and then seeks to establish some ways in which they intersect, drawing on ideas of authority and trustworthiness. It argues that despite the appearance of a deep tension between trust and critical thinking, they are importantly interdependent: if trust is to be warranted, critical thinking to determine trustworthiness is required; (...)
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  137.  10
    Does Student Debt Constitute a Bubble That May Bring About an Educational Crisis?Gheorghe H. Popescu - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):115-118.
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  138.  6
    The Neurobiology of Trust and Schooling.Derek Sankey - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):183-192.
    Are there neurobiological reasons why we are willing to trust other people and why ‘trust’ and moral values such as ‘care’ play a quite pivotal role in our social lives and the judgements we make, including our social interactions and judgements made in the context of schooling? In pursuing this question, this paper largely agrees with claims made by Patricia Churchland in her 2011 book Braintrust. She believes that moral values are rooted in basic brain circuitry and chemistry, which have (...)
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  139.  4
    Being Trustworthy: Going Beyond Evidence to Desiring.R. Scott Webster - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):152-162.
    If educators are to educate they must be accorded some level of trust. Anthony Giddens claims that because trust is not easily created, it is now being replaced with ‘confidence’ because this latter disposition is much easier to give and is more convenient. It is argued in this paper that this shift from trust to confidence stifles education because emphasis is placed solely upon qualifications and competence, and is neglectful of disclosing one’s motives and desires—which are considered to be essential (...)
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  140.  4
    Student Partnership, Trust and Authority in Universities.Morgan White - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):163-173.
    Marketisation is rife in higher education. Asymmetries between consumers and producers in markets result in inefficiencies. To address imbalances, policy-makers pushing higher education towards a market model have a tendency to increase the market power of the student by increasing information or amplifying voice. One such policy in England is called ‘students as partners.’ However, I argue here that student partnership can easily undermine relations of authority and trust between students and academic teachers.
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  141.  7
    In Search of a Universal Human Rights Metaphor: Moral Conversations Across Differences.Mordechai Gordon - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):83-94.
    This article takes up the educational challenge of the framers of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Specifically, the author explores the question of: how can we talk about a universal conception of human rights in a way that both respects the need for cultural pluralism and the necessity to protect those rights and freedoms that all people—regardless of differences such as race, class, culture, or religion—are entitled to? What metaphor or metaphors can be useful for us to speak clearly (...)
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  142.  4
    Universities, Knowledge and Pedagogical Configurations: Glimpsing the Complex University.Carolina Guzmán-Valenzuela - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):5-17.
    This paper elaborates a typology of universities in which each university is characteristically associated with diverse missions, different ways of producing knowledge and contrasting pedagogical configurations. Four university forms are identified, analysed and illustrated, namely the expert university, the non-elite university, the entrepreneurial university and the revolutionary university. It is suggested that the typology and the analysis of university forms offered here provide insight into the current positioning of universities in relation to the wider world and have potential in prompting (...)
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  143.  7
    Killing the Buddha: Towards a Heretical Philosophy of Learning.Viktor Johansson - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):61-71.
    This article explores how different philosophical models and pictures of learning can become dogmatic and disguise other conceptions of learning. With reference to a passage from St. Paul, I give a sense of the dogmatic teleology that underpins philosophical assumptions about learning. The Pauline assumption is exemplified through a variety of models of learning as conceptualised by Israel Scheffler. In order to show how the Paulinian dogmatism can give rise to radically different pictures of learning, the article turns to St. (...)
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  144.  6
    Toward a Modern Concept of Schooling: A Case Study on Hegel.Ari Kivelä - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):72-82.
    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel developed the concept of institutionalized education, which reflected public schooling and its legitimacy in the context of rapid transformation of European feudal societies to modern societies. The concept of school reflects the Hegelian theory of Bildung and the concept of modern society. What makes Hegel’s philosophy interesting is his conviction that the processes of Bildung can take place only in the context of social institutions and in the highly organized forms of human interaction regulated by those (...)
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  145.  3
    Rodgers on Calls for Observable Verbs.Jim Mackenzie - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):18-27.
    This paper takes up Shannon Rodgers’ 2016 critique of curriculum writers’ call for observable verbs, pp. 563–578), and argues that a more effective line of critique should focus not on metaphorical thinking, but on the notion of observation itself, by way of Nietzsche on metaphor, the history of astronomy, the non-existence of dragons and dissuading indigenous people from voting.
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  146. Page, Text and Screen in the University: Revisiting the Illich Hypothesis.Lavinia Marin, Jan Masschelein & Maarten Simons - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):49-60.
    In the age of web 2.0, the university is constantly challenged to re-adapt its ‘old-fashioned’ pedagogies to the new possibilities opened up by digital technologies. This article proposes a rethinking of the relation between university and (digital) technologies by focusing not on how technologies function in the university, but on their constituting a meta-condition for the existence of the university pedagogy of inquiry. Following Ivan Illich’s idea that textual technologies played a crucial role in the inception of the university, we (...)
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  147.  3
    Universities as Gendered Organizations.Ramona Mihăilă - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):1-4.
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  148.  1
    The Formation of the Willing Citizen – Tracing Reactive Nihilism in Late Capitalist Adult Education.Maria Olson, Magnus Dahlstedt, Andreas Fejes & Fredrik Sandberg - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):95-103.
    The role of education in citizen training has been well mapped out in youth education. What has been less studied is how this role comes into being in adult education. By providing illustrative empirical examples from a recently completed study of adult students enrolled in adult education, this article aims to offer a theoretical response to the question of the role of adult education in adult student citizen subjectivity formation. Taking on Diken’s concept of ‘reactive nihilism’, we wish to make (...)
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  149.  1
    Thinking in/Through Movements; Working with/in Affect Within the Context of Norwegian Early Years Education and Practice.Nina Rossholt - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):28-38.
    This paper draws on data undertaken with very young children within the context of Norwegian kindergartens. Specifically, the paper focuses on non-human and human movements. Mine included, that are undertaken in time and space. Following I argue that as the researcher I am always already entangled in inquiry and that there is no beginning. As a consequence, I cannot offer an account concerning movements that are predicated on humanist notions of linearity. Moreover, by immersing myself in process ontology, my efforts (...)
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  150.  5
    That’s Not Very Deleuzian”: Thoughts on Interrupting the Exclusionary Nature of “High Theory.Kathryn J. Strom - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):104-113.
    In the following essay, I discuss my own uneasy and nonlinear journey from the classroom to Deleuze, describing the concepts and lines of thought that have been productive in thinking differently about teaching and teacher education. I also detail my encounters with the surprising orthodoxies of using Deleuzian/Deleuzoguattarian thought. From these, I suggest that ‘being Deleuzian’ is itself a molar line that serves as an exclusionary mechanism, working to preserve high theory for the use of only a select few. Instead, (...)
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  151.  3
    Is Second Language Teaching Enslavement or Empowerment? Insights From an Hegelian Perspective.Manfred Man-fat Wu - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):39-48.
    Whether second language teaching contributes to the enslavement or empowerment of learners has become a branch in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages research. More and more discussions are emerging, and they tend to base on more and more diverse theoretical frameworks. This article aims to shed light on this issue by exploring it from a Hegelian framework of language. Among Hegel’s theories of language, two notions, namely, mutual recognition and universalisation of culture are selected for discussions. The conclusion (...)
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  152.  3
    The Educational Cost of Philosophical Suicide: What It Means to Be Lucid.Simone Thornton - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-11.
    The struggle to become lucid is at the heart of The Myth of Sisyphus. To understand the absurd is to understand that the fit between our conception of the world and the world itself is fraught with uncertainty; lucidity is the elucidation of the absurd. To be lucid is to revolt against the type of certainty that leads to suffering; to revolt against philosophical suicide. Camus teaches us the intellectual humility that stays hands; there is no reasoning that justifies suffering. (...)
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  153.  5
    Re-Considering the Ontoepistemology of Student Engagement in Higher Education.Ulrika Bergmark & Susanne Westman - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-11.
    We want to reconsider and explore the epistemology of student engagement in higher education as part of a democratic and sustainable education, going beyond neo-liberal groundings. In our exploration, we mainly draw on the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and his co-writers Felix Guattari and Claire Parnet. In contemporary educational systems, teachers are often urged to work with student engagement in various forms due to the connection between academic success and student engagement. Student engagement is being perceived as an important factor (...)
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