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  1.  27
    Oppositional Anger: Aptness Without Appreciation.Tamara Fakhoury - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37 (1):107-125.
    What makes anger an appropriate response to systemic injustice? Let us assume that it cannot merely be its positive effects. That is, sometimes we should be angry even when getting angry is bound to make things worse. What makes such anger appropriate? According to Amia Srinivasan (2017), counterproductive anger is only apt if it passes a necessary condition that I call the Matching Constraint: one’s personal reason for getting angry must match the fact that justifies their anger. When the Matching (...)
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  2.  16
    2019 NASSP Book Award Panel - Reply to Commentators. The Boundaries of Battlefields, Collaboration Between Enemies, and Just War Theory.Yvonne Chiu - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:225-233.
    Reply to commentators: Symposium on the winner of the 2019 NASSP Book Award Prize: Yvonne Chiu, *Conspiring with the Enemy: The Ethic of Cooperation in Warfare* (Columbia University Press, 2019).
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  3.  12
    Navigating the #MeToo Terrain in an Islamophobic Environment.Saba Fatima - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:57-74.
    In this paper, I explore the significance of an intersectional lens when it comes to our conversations surrounding the #MeToo movement, in particular the way that such a lens helps us in recognizing narratives of sexual assault and harassment that are not typically viewed as such. The mainstream discourse on #MeToo in the United States has been quite exclusionary when it comes to women who are non-dominantly situated within societal structures. In particular, this paper looks at how Muslim American women’s (...)
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  4.  3
    Policing the Gendered Economy of Care.Karen Adkins - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:91-106.
    In Kate Manne’s theory of misogyny, women’s behavior is surveilled so that they conform to gendered norms of behavior and care, and they are threatened or punished when they refuse to abide by norms. I seek here to extend her argument about surveillance to norms around masculinity, and to demonstrate the ways in which surveillance actually runs throughout the gendered economy of care. I assess the impacts of this surveillance, and argue that misogyny and masculinity are inextricably interlinked and mutually (...)
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  5.  8
    Feminist Theory, Gender Identity, and Liberation From Patriarchal Power.Gabrielle Bussell - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:175-193.
    Sally Haslanger offers the following concept of “woman”: If one is perceived as being biologically female and, in that context, one is subordinated owing to the background ideology, then one “functions” as a woman. An implication of this account is that if someone is not regarded by others as their self-identified gender, they do not function as that gender socially. Therefore, one objection to this ascriptive account of gender is that it wrongly undermines the gender identities of some trans people. (...)
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  6. Power, Intersectionality, and Radical Critique: A Response to Alcoff.Ann J. Cahilll - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:49-54.
    In this response to Linda Alcoff, I argue that her theory of power, influenced strongly by Michel Foucault, is central to understanding more clearly the political potential of liberatory social movements, as well as the threats against them. I argue that conceptualizing power as diffuse and ubiquitous is necessary to challenging unjust social structures, and that those defending those structures are invested in a binary conceptualization of power. Refusing such a binary conceptualization allows for an understanding of institutions and movements (...)
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  7. Criticizing Consent: A Reply to Susan Brison.Sarah Clark Miller - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:23-31.
    In this article I engage Susan Brison’s “What’s Consent Got to Do with It?” by offering multiple contributions regarding the limitations of the language and culture of consent. I begin by briefly appreciating what consent reveals to us morally about the harms of nonconsensual sex. I then offer five points regarding the language and culture of consent: Conceptualizing rape as nonconsensual sex hides from view the moral harm of having one’s will subjugated by another. The framework of consent renders women’s (...)
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  8. What’s Consent Got to Do with It?Susan J. Brison - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:9-21.
    What are we doing when we see rape as nonconsensual sex? What does this prevent us from seeing—and doing? On my account, the harm of rape—to the victim and to others—is not adequately captured by calling it “sex without consent.” If we want, first, to understand how rape harms its direct and its indirect victims and, second, to eradicate rape, or at least change the culture so that rape is less prevalent, the question “Did she consent to his doing this (...)
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  9.  2
    Outcasts and Relational Egalitarianism.Farhan Lakhany - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:127-151.
    Most individuals desire a more egalitarian society but figuring out what that would mean and how to get there is unclear. Elizabeth Anderson’s relational egalitarianism is one approach to understanding what building a more egalitarian society would mean; this article will agree with her analysis but will highlight how, in attempting to achieve that goal, some serious issues arise. Specifically, Anderson mentions that a consequence of her view would be the elimination of “outcasts” as a status of social groups and (...)
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  10.  2
    Breaking Down Communication: Narrative Medicine and its Distinctions.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:197-205.
    In “Communication Breakdown: Probing the Limits of Narrative Medicine and its Discontents”, David J. Leichter engages practical experience teaching medical ethics in the college classroom to explore opportunities—and limits—of narrative engagement within medical ethics and clinical practice. Leichter raises concerns regarding potential epistemic harms, both testimonial and hermeneutical, when individuals, or their pain, cannot be adequately recognized through expressive modes traditionally understood as “narrative.” While I largely agree with Leichter’s worries about narrative authority and limits, I challenge his characterization of (...)
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  11.  5
    The Radical Future of #MeToo: The Effects of an Intersectional Analysis.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:33-48.
    When feminist movements develop intersectional analyses of the problems they are addressing, especially to include race and class as well as other dimensions of society, their analyses of sexism will shift, and their demands will as a result become more structural, systemic, and radical. This paper will focus primarily on sexual harassment, with the understanding that harassment often escalates to coercive sex. I will argue that the future of the #MeToo movement not only should become more radical, but it must (...)
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  12.  1
    Construyendo Masculinidad: The Oppression of Men in the United States.Karina Ortiz Villa - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:75-90.
    I argue that men can be oppressed by virtue of being men; however, our definitions of men and masculinity must be redefined and reclaimed from the dominant white perspective. My claims are: current arguments on the oppression of men simpliciter are misguided as they fail to encompass the experiences of all men; any question regarding the oppression of men must reject the current static and universal definition of men; the oppression of men is an instantiation of structural oppression that allows (...)
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  13.  2
    Choosing What to Mean by “Respectability Politics”.Cara O’Connor - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:153-174.
    This essay treats divergent conceptions of “respectability politics” as a question of conceptual ethics. Influential discussions of respectability politics in the public sphere have centered on disagreements about tactics and strategies for liberation. But entwined within this discourse one can find a parallel effort to decide which conception of “respectability politics” will best serve the current moment of struggle. Should we accept its newer normative meaning, where it is used to condemn political tactics that ask African-Americans and members of other (...)
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