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  1. Promulgation, Condescension, Porosity and Defence: The Relationship Between Saint-Simonianism and Owenism.Michel Bellet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):315-344.
    ABSTRACT This article aims to add an important new dimension to the historical scholarship on early socialism by analysing the Saint-Simonian encounter with Owenism during the first decades of the nineteenth century. The article shows how the Saint-Simonian interpretation of Owenism was shaped by the manner by which the Saint-Simonians disseminated their doctrine. It draws on a number of neglected texts to show what the Saint-Simonians drew from Owen’s work and how they set out to distinguish themselves from Owen and (...)
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  2. Continental Exiles, Chartists and Socialists in London.Fabrice Bensimon - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):271-284.
    ABSTRACT This article focuses on the interactions between British Owenites and continental refugees and groups of democrats in London. The article argues that despite serious disagreements between Owenites and Chartists, their interactions were important. The article focuses on refugee groups London, in the 1830s and 1840s, and examines their links with both the democrats’ and Owenites’ networks. The article focuses first on Etienne Cabet and the French republican exiles in 1830s London, before moving on to two democratic societies of exiles (...)
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  3. A Transient Allergy: Owen and the Owenites According to Charles Fourier and the Fourierists, From the 1820s to 1837.Thomas Bouchet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):345-358.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the Fourierist reception of Owenism. In challenging the established historiography on Owen’s reception in France, the article draws on a wide range of Fourierist material – letters, unpublished draft manuscripts, and neglected articles in Fourierist and non-Fourierist periodicals – that previously not accessible to twentieth-century historians in order to reassess the Fourierist response to Owen and Owenism. The article pays special attention to the work of Fourier’s leading disciple, Victor Considerant. It contrasts Fourier’s highly critical evaluation (...)
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  4. Owen as read by Marc-Auguste Pictet (1752–1825) and J.C.L. Simonde de Sismondi.Nicolas Eyguesier - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):192-201.
    ABSTRACT This article examines how Owen’s ideas and their application in his factory in New-Lanark were understood and judged by the two leading members of Geneva’s liberal élite, J.C.L. Simonde de Sismondi and Marc-Auguste Pictet, who wrote extensively on questions pertaining to the development of industry. While Pictet and Sismondi shared Owen’s concerns over the deleterious consequences of industrialisation, and examined with interest his proposals to resolve these problems, they were quick to distance themselves from his solutions, and rejected his (...)
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  5. Acknowledgements.Ludovic Frobert & Michael Drolet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):191-191.
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  6. Robert Owen and Continental Europe.Ludovic Frobert & Michael Drolet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):175-190.
    ABSTRACT This introduction examines the intellectual, political, economic, and social context to the reception of Robert Owen’s ideas, and Owenism more generally, in Continental Europe. The introduction describes how Owen’s ideas attracted significant interest in the years following the Napoleonic Wars, particularly in France, and discusses how the French reception of his ideas served as a filter and medium through which his ideas were disseminated throughout Continental Europe. The article describes the individual contributions to this special issue and traces the (...)
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  7. The ‘Science of Education’ and Owenism: The Case of Joseph Rey.Ludovic Frobert & Michael Drolet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):216-230.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the impact of Robert Owen’s educational ideas in France. It traces how his ideas attracted the attention of French liberals, particularly Charles de Lasteyrie, Alexandre de Laborde and Joseph-Marie de Gérando, and republicans associated with Marc-Antoine Jullien’s Revue Encyclopédique. The article focuses in particular on the work of one of Owen’s early French followers, the leading radical egalitarian political and social theorist Joseph Rey. The article examines how Owen’s reflections on education served as the foundation for (...)
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  8. Liberal Economists and Owenism: Blanqui and Reybaud.Thomas Hopkins - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):231-251.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the reaction to Owen’s work in the circle associated with the liberal Journal des Économistes. It attempts to reconstruct the liberal argument against utopian socialist schemes of ‘regeneration’ and ‘redistribution’, and against those associated with Robert Owen in particular. It focuses on the works of Louis Reybaud and Adolphe Blanqui and their critical engagement with the writings of Saint-Simon, Fourier and Owen. It offers a detailed analysis of Reybaud’s Études sur les réformateurs, ou socialistes modernes, which (...)
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  9.  2
    From Rejection to Historicisation: The Reception of Robert Owen’s Ideas in the Nineteenth-Century Polish Context.Piotr Kuligowski - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):202-215.
    ABSTRACT The main aim of this article is to investigate the reception of Owen’s ideas in the nineteenth-century Polish context. I argue that Owen’s ideas did not attract as much attention as those of, amongst others, Charles Fourier, Félicité de Lamennais, or – in the second half of the century – Karl Marx. Despite being overshadowed by other Romantic socialists, Owen’s reception in Poland can be described as having been marked by three phases. Though we can determine the general direction (...)
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  10. Robert Owen’s Quest for the ‘New Moral World’ in a Non-Industrialized Country.José Manuel Menudo Pachón & Fernando López Castellano - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):359-373.
    ABSTRACT This article examines how Robert Owen’s ideas, and the example of his New Lanark Mill, were understood and received in Spain in the nineteenth century. It follows recent historiographic trends in the history of early Spanish socialism to show that although Owen’s ideas could not have a decisive impact in a largely agricultural economy and society, his ideas did draw more significant attention that has been thought. The article examines how Owen’s ideas, like those of Fourier and Saint-Simon, were (...)
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  11. Robert Owen’s Influence on French Republicanism in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century: The Role of Former Saint-Simonians and Their Networks.Quentin Schwanck - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):299-314.
    ABSTRACT Robert Owen’s ideas and achievements largely shaped French republicanism in the 1830s and 1840s, particularly through the action of former Saint-Simonian socialists. This article explores this process, focusing on two of its major actors: the philosophers Pierre Leroux and Jean Reynaud, who joined the Republican Party in 1833. The two friends formulated an ambitious and influential republican doctrine in their Encyclopédie Nouvelle, in which Owen’s philosophy was largely mobilised, most particularly when Leroux theorised his religion de la fraternité on (...)
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  12. ‘Goddess of Reason’: Anna Doyle Wheeler, Owenism and the Rights of Women.Ophélie Siméon - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):285-298.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the resonance of Robert Owen’s ideas in the field of women’s rights with the view to determining the extent of their dissemination in transnational networks. The article focuses on the life and work of Anna Doyle Wheeler, which offers an important, though understudied, case for exploring early feminist circles, and, as she was a friend of Owen’s and one of his earliest supporters from the 1820s onwards, the impact of Owen’s ideas within these circles. The article (...)
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  13.  2
    The Reception of Robert Owen's Thought in Ninteenth- and Twentieth-Century Italy.Riccardo Soliani & Vitantonio Gioia - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):374-403.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the reception of Owen's thought in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Italy. The articles shows that while Owen attracted the attentionof Piedmontese liberals in the early 1820s, such as Giovanni Arrivabene, and were integrated into the wider Risorgimento, they were, as the Guiseppe Manzzini's work demonstrated, eclipsed by what were considered more the immediate political objectives of the Risorgimento. Where Owen's ideas did attract widespread interest was on the question of educational reform. This was because education was very (...)
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  14. Millennium and Enlightenment: Robert Owen and the Second Coming of the Truth.Gareth Stedman Jones - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):252-270.
    ABSTRACT This article aims to explain the family resemblance between the early socialism that emerged in France from the aftermath of the Revolution and Owenite socialism, which emerged out of the very different political and religious circumstances of late Georgian Britain. While the ‘sciences’ of Henri Saint-Simon and Charles Fourier were conceived to end the crisis produced by the French Revolution, Owen’s newfound principle, what he called the ‘science of the influence of circumstance’, emerged from his A New View of (...)
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  15.  4
    Berkeley’s Passive Obedience: The Logic of Loyalty.Timo Airaksinen - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):58-70.
    ABSTRACT Berkeley argues in Passive Obedience that what he calls morality is based on the divine laws of nature, which God gave us and whose validity is like that of the principles of geometry. One of these laws is the categorical demand for loyalty to the supreme political power. This is to say, rebellious action is strictly impermissible and passive obedience is morally required: we may disobey but only in terms of action omission and then we must accept the penalty (...)
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  16.  1
    Physiocracy in the Eighteenth-Century America. Economic Theory and Political Weapons.Manuela Albertone - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):97-118.
    ABSTRACT This essay aims at reconsidering the impact of Physiocratic ideas on the United States context during and after the American Revolution, which represented the first turning point concerning the democratic implications of political economy. In the confrontation in the 1790s between Jefferson’s Republicans and Hamilton’s Federalists the early scientific analysis of economics, grounded in the central role of agriculture formulated by Physiocracy, gave strong theoretical validation of the agrarian democracy ideology as an alternative to the British model and contributed (...)
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  17. The Intellectual Origins of Mirabeau.Auguste Bertholet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):91-96.
    ABSTRACT The recent discovery of the marquis de Mirabeau’s lifelong correspondence with his Swiss friend Frédéric de Sacconay has shed new light on the development of his economic thought. Not only is it the only precise entry in his daily life leading to his fame, but it also clarifies the context in which important eighteenth-century texts have been produced and read. Amongst this collection of letters, one of them, written by Mirabeau on October 12, 1740, establishes that he possessed a (...)
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  18.  3
    A Novel (Coronavirus) Reading of Hobbes's Leviathan.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):33-37.
    ABSTRACT In the style of Swift and Wollstonecraft, I contribute to the growing pandemic literature on Hobbes by writing a feminist satire of the Leviathan for the age of the novel coronavirus. Hobbes's conceptions of the state of nature and the body politic are eerily relevant to the present political crises, especially in the United States. In a personal narrative that is both arch and absolutely serious, I reveal how a woman-empowering vision of a healthy global body politic can be (...)
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  19. John Dunn and the History of Political Theory.Davide Cadeddu - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):158-167.
    ABSTRACT In 1992, John Dunn published an essay in Italian in which he summarized and clarified certain aspects of his historiographical vision concerning the history of political theory. A careful analysis of the text – corroborated by a consideration of later comments as well as general historical-theoretical references – gives us an insight into the lights and shadows of his thought. This reinterpretation reveals the originality of a perspective that examined the meaning of ‘canon’ within the history of political theory, (...)
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  20. Roman Dictatorship in the French Revolution.Marc de Wilde - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):140-157.
    ABSTRACT This article seeks to explain why the Roman dictatorship, which had served as a positive model of constitutional emergency government until the French Revolution, acquired a negative meaning during the Revolution itself. Both Montesquieu and Rousseau regarded the dictatorship as a legitimate institution, necessary to protect the republic in times of crisis. For the French revolutionaries, the word ‘dictatorship’ acquired negative connotations: it became a rhetorical tool for accusing their political opponents of authoritarian rule. This article argues that Carl (...)
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  21. Catholic ‘Conscience’, Duty and Disputes Over English Liberties in Jacobean Ireland.Mark A. Hutchinson - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):38-57.
    ABSTRACT The article examines Old English claims to catholic ‘liberty of conscience’ and the way in which this engendered a discussion of English liberties in Ireland. Old English representatives sought to ground their claims to ‘liberty of conscience’ in established practice, custom and law. Their claims to ‘liberty of conscience’ also brought into play the vocabulary of corporate and parliamentary liberty. In response, New English protestants turned to ideas of duty and citizenship, which were equally embedded in conceptions of English (...)
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  22. Egyptomania and Religion in James Burnett, Lord Monboddo’s ‘History of Man’.R. J. W. Mills - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):119-139.
    ABSTRACT The Scottish judge and ‘eccentric’ philosopher James Burnett, Lord Monboddo’s significance within Enlightenment thought is usually seen as stemming from his Origin and Progress of Language. The OPL was a major contribution to the Enlightenment’s debate over the philosophy of language, and established Monboddo’s reputation as an innovative and influential, yet controversial and credulous proto-anthropologist. In the following I explore Monboddo’s Egyptomania and the role it plays in his account of the origins and development of religion within his larger (...)
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  23.  5
    Leviathan Inc.: Hobbes on the Nature and Person of the State.Johan Olsthoorn - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):17-32.
    ABSTRACT This article aspires to make two original contributions to the vast literature on Hobbes’s account of the nature and person of the commonwealth: I provide the first systematic analysis of his changing conception of ‘person’; and use it to show that those who claim that the Hobbesian commonwealth is created by personation by fiction misconstrue his theory of the state. Whereas Elements/de Cive advance a metaphysics-based distinction between individuals and corporations, from Leviathan onwards Hobbes contrasts individuals acting in their (...)
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  24. Homo Duplex: The Two Origins of Man in Rousseau’s Second Discourse.Emma Planinc - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):71-90.
    ABSTRACT A division in scholarship on Rousseau’s Second Discourse turns on the issue of division itself. Some see Rousseau’s natural man collapsing the division between man and beast through suggesting that our origins might be in orangutans, while others see Rousseau depicting a rupture of the human being from the rest of the animal kingdom through the separation of the physical and the metaphysical. I argue that in looking to the natural scientific culture of Rousseau’s own time, one can see (...)
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  25.  4
    Hobbes on Rebellious Groups.Jerónimo Rilla - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):1-16.
    ABSTRACT In this paper we deal with Hobbes’s elucidation of the political conflict caused by rebellious groups. First of all, we attempt to prove that groups are important characters in Hobbesian antagonisms. Secondly, it will be argued that the isomorphic structure that underlies all associations is vital to account for these disputes. To wit, the fact that minor corporate bodies are ‘similar’ vis à vis the State leaves a lengthy flank open to rebellion, since this homology may encourage their leaders (...)
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  26.  2
    From Cicero to the Science of Man: From Moral Theology to Moral Philosophy: Cicero and Visions of Humanity From Locke to Hume, by Tim Stuart-Buttle, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2019, 288 Pp., £55 (Hardcover), ISBN-13: 9780198835585. [REVIEW]Paul Sagar - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):168-174.
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