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  1.  7
    User-Centered Design and the Normative Politics of Technology.Richard Badham & Karin Garrety - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (2):191-212.
    A long tradition of discourse and practice claims that technology designers need to take note of the characteristics and aspirations of potential users in design. Practitioners in the field of user-centered design have developed methods to facilitate this process. These methods represent interesting vehicles for the pursuit of normative politics of technology. In this article, the authors use a case study of the introduction and use of UCD methods in Australia to explore the politics of getting the methods to work (...)
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  2.  3
    In Memoriam: Robert K. Merton, Dorothy Nelkin, and David Edge: Presidential Address, Annual Meeting 2003, Atlanta, GA.Wiebe E. Bijker - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (2):131-138.
    At the occasion of the annual banquet of the Society for Social Studies of Science, the President commemorated Robert K. Merton, Dorothy Nelkin, and David Edge, who all died in 2003. The address highlights some of the contributions of these three scholars and past presidents to the development of the social studies of science, and to 4S.
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  3.  4
    Translation Terrain and Pied Piper Detour: How Experts Eliminated a Norwegian Digital City Project.Jarle Brosveet - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (2):213-241.
    The analysis of contemporary socio-technical processes can benefit greatly, methodologically speaking, from considering past processes and solutions. Obviously, all technological projects have a prehistory upon which they depend to a certain extent. In some cases, the prehistory might even take on the shape of a translation terrain, which technical experts employ explicitly to sidestep inexperienced nonexperts. Also, mechanisms that can best be described as a pied piper detour, rather than as an obligatory passage point, are relied on by technical experts (...)
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  4.  2
    God Talk: Confusion between Science and Religion: Posthumous Essay.Dorothy Nelkin - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (2):139-152.
    Controversies concerning the religious implications of science have grown increasingly strained in recent years. Creation scientists have deployed new strategies to eliminate the teaching of evolution in public schools; right-to-life groups have obstructed fetal tissue research; and clerical groups have criticized genomics and genetic testing. Meanwhile, the Templeton Foundation has begun promoting the idea that there is no conflict between science and religion. In this paper, I explore emerging efforts to reconcile religion and science. I focus particularly on the use (...)
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  5.  6
    Those Who Get Hurt Aren’t Always Being Heard: Scientist-Resident Interactions over Community Water.Trudy Pauluth Penner, Gail Bradshaw, Donna Tait, Brenda Storr, Robin McMillan, Lilian Pozzer-Ardenghi, Janet Riecken & Wolff-Michael Roth - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (2):153-183.
    This study is about the interaction of scientific expertise and local knowledge in the context of a contested issue: the quality and quantity of safe drinking water available to some residents in one Canadian community. The authors articulate the boundary work in which scientific and technological expertise and discourse are played out against local knowledge and water needs to prevent the construction of a water main extension that would provide a group of residents with the same water that others in (...)
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  6.  4
    Cultural Politics of Technology: Combining Critical and Constructive Interventions?Knut H. Sørensen - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (2):184-190.
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  7.  3
    Danger! Metaphors at Work in Economics, Geophysiology, and the Internet.Sally Wyatt - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (2):242-261.
    The authoranalyzes the types of metaphors that are used to describe the Internetin issues of Wired magazine from before and after the dot-com collapse to understand the perceptions and expectations of some of the actors involved in the shaping of the Internet. In addition, the metaphors deployed in economics and geophysiology are used to demonstrate how metaphors can influence public debate, policy, and theory. The author argues that metaphors do not simply have a descriptive function but that they also carry (...)
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  8.  3
    Evaluation of a Deliberative Conference.Lynn J. Frewer, Roy Marsh & Gene Rowe - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (1):88-121.
    The concept of “public participation” is currently one of great interest to researchers and policy makers. In response to a perceived need for greater public involvement in decision making and policy formation processes on the part of both policymakers and the general public, a variety of novel mechanisms have been developed, such as the consensus conference and citizens jury, to complement traditional mechanisms, such as the public meeting. However, the relative effectiveness of the various mechanisms is unclear, as efforts at (...)
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  9.  6
    Configuring the User as Everybody: Gender and Design Cultures in Information and Communication Technologies.Marcelle Stienstra, Els Rommes & Nelly Oudshoorn - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (1):30-63.
    Based on two case studies of the design of electronic communication networks developed in the public and private sector, this article explores the barriers within current design cultures to account for the needs and diversity of users. Whereas the constraints on user-centered design are usually described in macrosociological terms, in which the user–technology relation is merely understood as a process of the inclusion or exclusion of users in design, the authors suggest that it is important to adopt a semiotic approach. (...)
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  10.  11
    Ethics in Technological Culture: A Programmatic Proposal for a Pragmatist Approach.Tsjalling Swierstra, Michiel Korthals, Maartje Schermer & Jozef Keulartz - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (1):3-29.
    Neither traditional philosophy nor current applied ethics seem able to cope adequately with the highly dynamic character of our modern technological culture. This is because they have insufficient insight into the moral significance of technological artifacts and systems. Here, much can be learned from recent science and technology studies. They have opened up the black box of technological developments and have revealed the intimate intertwinement of technology and society in minute detail. However, while applied ethics is characterized by a certain (...)
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  11.  1
    The Object and the Other in Holographic Research: Approaching Passivity and Responsibility of Human Actors.Ivan Tchalakov - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (1):64-87.
    This article is written in the framework of actor-network theory and presents the results of an ethnographic study of the holographic research laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria, conducted during the period of 1993-1997. It focuses on the microlevel of laboratory practice — the intimate relationships between scientists and the objects they are studying. The article specifies the constrictions imposed by the concepts of “laboratory” and “experiment,” and advances a new concept of heterogeneous couple. The “coupling” is a process in which the (...)
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