Studia Leibnitiana

ISSNs: 0039-3185, 2366-228X

13 found

View year:

  1.  2
    False Ideas: Leibniz and Aquinas.Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (2):205-224.
    Though accepting the traditional view that truth and falsity are properties of propositions and judgments, Leibniz does not refrain from predicating truth and falsity of pre-judgmental items such as ideas, which he considers to be true iff logically consistent, and false otherwise. Elsewhere, however, Leibniz claims that ideas are true or false only insofar as they include the (true or false) affirmation that their object is possible. This paper aims to cast light on Leibniz’s doctrine of ideas as truth-bearers by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  1
    Dokumente zur Geschichte der Leibniz-Edition (III).Wenchao Li - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (2):267-280.
  3.  4
    Leibniz on Relations, Again.Massimo Mugnai - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (2):250-266.
    In his article, Florian Vermeiren attributes to Leibniz – like other interpreters before him – the distinction of two different kinds of relations: 1) relations in the proper sense of the word as, for example, the fatherhood subsisting between Sophroniscus and Socrates, which Leibniz considers situated ‘outside the subjects’ involved; 2) relational properties, such as being a father, inherent in Sophroniscus. The distinction is clearly present in Leibniz’s writings. According to Vermeiren, Leibniz considers ‘purely mental’ only the relations ‘out of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Zur modallogischen Fundierung des Leibniz’schen Möglichkeitsbegriffes.Hans Poser - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (2):156-162.
  5. Leibniz, der Höfling.Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (2):142-155.
  6. Zur Frage der Erkenntnis der Existenz bei Christian Wolff.Juan Ignacio Gómez Tutor - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (2):184-204.
    The paper first examines the difference between Wolff’s demonstration of my present existence and Descartes’ intuitive connection of my thinking with my existence. The results of this investigation enable us to analyse two controversial answers to the question of the knowledge of existence in Wolff’s works. The first answer is from Jürgen Stolzenberg, who discusses Wolff’s proof of the statement: I am. The second is written by Luigi Cataldi Madonna, who investigates the concept of contingent existence in Wolff’s works. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Questioning the Conceptualist Reading of Leibniz’s Theory of Relations.Florian Vermeiren - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (2):225-249.
    This paper challenges Mugnai’s conceptualist reading of Leibniz’s theory of relations. I specifically question his idea that relational accidents are mental additions to absolute foundations. I examine some of the evidence on which he relies. Most importantly, I question his interpretation of Leibniz’s rejection of purely extrinsic denominations (abbreviated “NPED”) as stating that relations result from non-relational foundations. Mugnai thereby understands Leibniz’s notion of ‘extrinsic’ as ‘relational’ or ‘relative’. Such a reading contradicts both Leibniz’s definition of ‘extrinsic denominations’ and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  2
    Leibniz as a Moralist: In Memory of Marcelo Dascal.Elhanan Yakira - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (2):163-183.
    This article is written in the memory of Marcelo Dascal, and is conceived as an imaginary answer to a question put by him to the author: what is the point – given a shared non-religious, even atheistic, outlook – in translating (into the Hebrew) of Leibniz’s Théodicée? The two main theses of this imagined answer are: 1. That there is in the Théodicée a moral theory, partly implicit but irreducible and relatively independent of its theological content, and that this theory (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  5
    Die Sonnenfinsternisse von 1654 und 1706.Hans Gaab - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (1):9-40.
    In early modern times, solar eclipses were feared events that gave rise to much astrological speculation, even though these events could already be predicted long in advance. Around 1700, the situation was already different. Astrology had lost its status as a science and had largely been pushed out of the universities. On the other hand solar eclipses had become very important for cartography. From the beginning and end times of the eclipse at different locations, the differences of their geographical coordinates (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  8
    Einleitung.Klaus-Dieter Herbst - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (1):3-8.
    With an overview of the most important scientific innovations in 17th century Europe as a background, the focus is on the field of astronomy and its distinction from astrology. The essays collected in this volume are situated within this development of the early modern period.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  9
    Johann Theodor Jablonski: Protocollum Concilij Societatis Scientiarum (II).Wenchao Li, Stefan Luckscheiter & Sabine Sellschopp - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (1):117-136.
  12.  12
    Barocke Weltmodelle: Der Gottorfer Globus des Adam Olearius und die Riesengloben Erhard Weigels.Günther Oestmann - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (1):62-95.
    Between 1650 and 1664, a giant globe was created in Gottorf under Duke Friedrich III, which was widely known and marvelled at by many contemporaries as a wonder of the world. The scientific management of the project was the responsibility of the court mathematician and librarian Adam Olearius. The Gottorf Globe and its counterpart (a “Sphaera Copernicana”) presented the astronomical knowledge of the time in a pictorial form. The image of the earth and the cosmos was also intended to show (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  13
    The Improved Calendar of 1700 and the Interplay with Astronomical Data.Robert W. Schmidt - 2022 - Studia Leibnitiana 54 (1):96-116.
    We discuss the astronomical underpinning of the improved calendar of 1700. Starting from the astronomical motivation of the Gregorian calendar of 1582 and the rejection of this reform in Protestant states in Europe, we describe how the astronomical Easter reckoning based on Kepler’s Rudolphine tables led to the foundation of Berlin Observatory and enabled the founding of the Electoral Brandenburg Society of Sciences, which had to finance itself through a calendar monopoly.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues