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  1.  2
    Children’s Moral Rights and UK School Exclusions.John Tillson & Laura Oxley - 2020 - Theory and Research in Education 18 (4).
    This article argues that uses of exclusion by schools in the United Kingdom (UK) often violate children’s moral rights. It contends that while exclusion is not inherently incompatible with children’s moral rights, current practice must be reformed to align with them. It concludes that as a non-punitive preventive measure, there may be certain circumstances in schools where it is necessary to exclude a child in order to safeguard the weighty interests of others in the school community. However, reform is needed (...)
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  2. What Makes a Response to Schoolroom Wrongs Permissible?Helen Brown Coverdale - 2020 - Theory and Research in Education 18 (1):23-39.
    Howard’s moral fortification theory of criminal punishment lends itself to justifying correction for children in schools that is supportive. There are good reasons to include other students in the learning opportunity occasioned by doing right in response to wrong, which need not exploit the wrongdoing student as a mere means. Care ethics can facilitate restorative and problem-solving approaches to correction. However, there are overriding reasons against doing so when this stigmatises the wrongdoing student, since this inhibits their learning. Responses that (...)
     
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  3.  4
    Discourse Ethics, Epistemology and Educational Justice – A Reply to Harvey Siegel.Julian Culp - 2020 - Theory and Research in Education 2 (18):151-73.
    This article explores the contribution of Jürgen Habermas’ discourse theory of morality, politics, and law to theorizing educational justice. First, it analyzes Christopher Martin’s discourse-ethical argument that the development of citizens’ discursive agency is required on epistemic grounds. The article criticizes this argument and claims that the moral importance of developing discursive agency should be justified instead on the basis of moral grounds. Second, the article examines Harvey Siegel’s critique of Habermas’ moral epistemology and suggests that Siegel neglects that the (...)
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