Year:

  1.  2
    Ethical Considerations for Providing In-Home Mental Health Services for Homebound Individuals.Kelly M. Boland - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (4):287-304.
    The number of homebound individuals in the United States is on the rise, causing health-care professionals to expand in-home health services to help meet the increased demand. Due to the prevalence of feelings of isolation and depression in this population, it is imperative that mental health professionals join this effort to increase access to mental health services. Delivering psychotherapy in clients’ homes presents many advantages to these homebound individuals, but there is a dearth of literature addressing how therapists should handle (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  8
    “The Road Not Taken”: A Study of Moral Intensity, Whistleblowing, and Regret.Amy Fredin, Roopa Venkatesh, Jennifer Riley & Susan W. Eldridge - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (4):320-340.
    Despite attempts to encourage whistleblowing, lingering reluctance to report questionable acts remains frustratingly apparent. Our objective is to examine the regret a professional anticipates when evaluating the action of reporting or not reporting, and whether the framing of the action influences regret. Responses from 263 professionals indicate that regret depends on the moral intensity of the situation and how the action is framed. Regret for whistleblowing is not comparable to regret for not remaining silent, despite the fact that these two (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  9
    Youth and Parent Appraisals of Participation in a Study of Spontaneous and Induced Pediatric Clinical Pain.Kara Hawley, Jeannie S. Huang, Matthew Goodwin, Damaris Diaz, Virginia R. de Sa, Kathryn A. Birnie, Christine T. Chambers & Kenneth D. Craig - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (4):259-273.
    The current study examined youths’ and their parents’ perceptions concerning participation in an investigation of spontaneous and induced pain during recovery from laparoscopic appendectomy. Youth and their parents independently completed surveys about their study participation. On a scale from 0 to 10, both parents and youth rated their experience as positive. Among youth, experience ratings did not differ by pain severity and survey responses did not differ by age. Most youth reported that they would tell another youth to participate. Ethical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  7
    The Mediating Role of Moral Ownership in the Relationship Between Organizational Support and Employees’ Ethical Behavior: A Study of Higher Education Faculty Members.Jino Malakkaran Johny & Lata Dyaram - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (4):305-319.
    We examined the mediating role of employee moral ownership in the relationship between employees’ perception of organizational support and their actual ethical behavior. Data were collected from 689 faculty members affiliated with different educational institutions in India. Structural equation modeling analysis showed that perceived organizational support significantly impacts employee ethical behavior. In addition, the results revealed that employee moral ownership mediates the relationship between perceived organizational support and employee ethical behavior. Implications and limitations of the study are discussed.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  6
    Allocating Scarce Medical Resources: Using Social Usefulness as a Criterion.D. Selvaraj, A. McClelland & A. Furnham - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (4):274-286.
    This study aimed to determine if people would use social usefulness as a criterion when allocating a kidney to potential recipients. Participants ranked hypothetical patients in order of priority to receive the kidney, using only information on the patients’ volunteering record, intelligence, emotional intelligence, and attractiveness. The results showed that volunteers were prioritized over nonvolunteers, highly intelligent patients over those with average intelligence, patients with high emotional intelligence over those with average emotional intelligence, and good-looking patients over average-looking patients. There (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  14
    “Just Access”? Questions of Equity in Access and Funding for Assistive Technology.Evelyne Durocher, Rosalie H. Wang, Jerome Bickenbach, Daphne Schreiber & Michael G. Wilson - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):172-191.
    Assistive technology has great potential to contribute to health, functioning, and quality of life. To date, as exemplified in the Canadian context, variations and inequities in access to assistive technology are evident; the development of legislation, policies, and programs has not kept up with the increasing use of assistive technology. In this article, we apply ;Daniels’s theory of just health to argue that equitable access to assistive technology funding and services is necessary for justice. In doing so, we offer theoretical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  2
    Can Norman Daniels Help You Get a Wheelchair? A Commentary on Durocher Et Al.Mary Yvonne Egan - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):192-195.
    Durocher and colleagues argue that Norman Daniels’s notion of just health could provide a useful framework for decreasing inequities in access to assistive technology. I argue that it would provide limited help for two reasons. First, Daniels’s reliance on normal species functioning as the goal of health care and his assumptions regarding the impact of normal species functioning on reasonable life projects create substantial difficulties for application to assistive technology. Second, although Daniels’s requirements for distributive justice provide a critical starting (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  3
    When It Comes to People, One Size Doesn’T Fit All: A Comment on Wayne.Patricia Illingworth - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):254-258.
    Dr. Wayne proposes that an autonomy-based approach to the treatment and care of older patients with dementia be replaced with an agency-based approach. In this commentary, I suggest that such a shift is unnecessary and would undermine patients’ moral, legal, and human rights.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  5
    Access to Assistive Technology, Systems Thinking, and Market Shaping: A Response to Durocher Et Al.Malcolm MacLachlan - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):196-200.
    Fairness of access to assistive technology is important for its allocation on an equitable basis and for broader social justice and rights issues. Although the use of Daniels’s notion of “justice as fair opportunity” is helpful to the context of assistive technology, other aspects of Daniels’s broader conceptualisation of “just health” are not appropriate in this context. It is argued that fairness of access to assistive technology is crucial for the equitable attainment of the sustainable development goals; however, such access (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  5
    Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Information Technologies. Some Ethical Observations—A Comment on Chalgoumi Et Al.Fiachra O’Brolcháin & Bert Gordijn - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):218-222.
    This comment on Chalgoumi et al.’s article “Information Privacy for Technology Users with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Why Does It Matter?” focuses on the concept of autonomy in order to expand the scope of the ethical discussion. First we explore the conceptual and practical relations between privacy and autonomy. Following this, we address the issue of underfunding of information technology for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in terms of distributive justice and provide some potential policy solutions.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  94
    Information Privacy for Technology Users With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Why Does It Matter?Maxine Perrin, Rawad Mcheimech, Johanna Lake, Yves Lachapelle, Jeffrey W. Jutai, Amélie Gauthier-Beaupré, Crislee Dignard, Virginie Cobigo & Hajer Chalghoumi - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):201-217.
    This article aims to explore the attitudes and behaviors of persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities related to their information privacy when using information technology. Six persons with IDD were recruited to participate to a series of 3 semistructured focus groups. Data were analyzed following a hybrid thematic analysis approach. Only 2 participants reported using IT every day. However, they all perceived IT use benefits, such as an increased autonomy. Participants demonstrated awareness of privacy concerns, but not in situations involving (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  2
    A Case for Greater Risk Tolerance in Internet Use by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Comment on Chalghoumi Et Al.David Wasserman - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):223-226.
    This comment argues for increased tolerance of privacy risks in the Internet activity of adults with intellectual disabilities. Excessive caution about such risks denies those individuals not only the great benefits of Internet use but also the difficult but valuable experiences of loss, disappointment, and hurt associated with those risks. A level of risk-aversion appropriate for small children will be disrespectful for adults with intellectual disabilities. To the extent that additional safeguards are justified, they are better achieved through individualized security (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  3
    The End of Dependence? Ethical Issues in the Adoption of Assistive Technologies: An Introduction.Katherine Wayne* - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):167-171.
    This special issue explores the evolving role of assistive technology in health and medicine, with 3 original articles and 5 commentaries. The following introduction provides an overview of the issue’s unifying themes and the articles’ aims and concerns, as well as reflection on some critical points for discussion raised in the commentaries. Assistive technology finds itself at a pivotal point of development and integration into current systems, where sound and innovative ethical guidance is crucial. With this issue we hope to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  6
    How Can Ethics Support Innovative Health Care for an Aging Population?Katherine Wayne - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):227-253.
    The rapidly expanding aging population presents an urgent global challenge cutting through just about every dimension of worldly life, including the social, political, cultural, and economic. Developing innovations in health and assistive technology are poised to support effective and sustainable health care in the face of this challenge, yet there is scant discussion of the ethical issues surrounding AT for older persons with dementia. Demands for ethical frameworks that can respond to frontline dilemmas regarding AT development and provision, and how (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  7
    Is There Social Consensus Regarding Researcher Conflicts of Interest?Zeynep G. Aytug, Hannah R. Rothstein, Mary C. Kern & Zhu Zhu - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (2):101-140.
    Consensus around what constitutes researcher conflicts of interest and awareness of their influence on our research are two critical steps in ensuring the integrity of our science. In this research, data were collected from individual scholars via 2 surveys 5 years apart and from journals and associations to examine the level of social consensus and moral awareness among scholars, journals, and associations regarding researcher COIs. Although we observed increases in level of social consensus and moral awareness between 2012 and 2017, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  3
    Ethical Considerations for Assessing Parent Mental Health During Child Assessment Services.Stephen J. Molitor & Melissa R. Dvorsky - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (2):87-100.
    Parents play an integral role in the mental health service provision of children and adolescents, and they can have significant effects on the outcomes of youth. A growing body of research has linked parents’ own mental health status to numerous outcomes for their children, and recent guidelines have emerged recommending the assessment of parent psychopathology when treating child patients. However, these recommendations present a range of ethical considerations. Mental health professionals must determine if the assessment of a parent is empirically (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Listen First: Dialogic Research Ethics With Caribbean Signing Communities.Elizabeth S. Parks - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (2):156-166.
    Successful research of Caribbean signed languages and deaf communities involves negotiating complex communication ethics toward both people and languages. In this article, I ground a call for ethical listening to Caribbean deaf and signing communities in sociolinguistic research that investigated deaf community and sign language boundaries in the Caribbean. I argue that a dialogic ethic that privileges listening is foundational for ethical research with Caribbean deaf and signing communities by discussing two ethical challenges that were central to understanding their narrative (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  3
    Retractions in the Engineering Field: A Study on the Web of Science Database.Priscila Rubbo, Caroline Lievore Helmann, Celso Bilynkievycz dos Santos & Luiz Alberto Pilatti - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (2):141-155.
    This study assesses the retractions of scientific articles in engineering journals indexed on the Web of Science from 1945 to 2015. The data set was built based on documents containing the keywords retracted, retraction, withdrawal, or redress. We used database exploration techniques, including Structured Query Language and analysis of variance, for data analysis. We analyzed 238 retractions published by 117 journals. The most common reason for retraction was unethical research, and higher impact factors journals tended to publish more retractions. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  16
    Academic Cheating in Disliked Classes.Eric M. Anderman & Sungjun Won - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (1):1-22.
    Academic dishonesty occurs at alarming rates in higher education. In the present study, we examined predictors of academic cheating behaviors, and beliefs in the acceptability of cheating, in disliked courses at two large universities, using structural equation modeling. Perceived mastery and extrinsic goal structures were related to beliefs about cheating but not cheating behaviors. Beliefs in the acceptability of cheating were more likely to be endorsed in math and science courses. College students were more likely to cheat and to believe (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  5
    Academic Integrity From China to the United States: The Acculturation Process for Chinese Graduate Students in the United States.Hu Jian, Russell Marion & Weijun Wang - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (1):51-70.
    The ethics-related beliefs of Chinese international graduate students are heavily influenced by their academic cultural background, and given the nature of that culture, they often face challenges when adapting to the U.S. academic environment. This qualitative study examines Chinese graduate students’ perceptions of the differences between Chinese and American academic integrity practices and the effects of those differences on their ethical practices and adaptations in a graduate program in the United States. Data were collected via semistructured interviews in a public (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  11
    A Wake-Up Call? Issues With Plagiarism in Transnational Higher Education.Anne Palmer, Mark Pegrum & Grace Oakley - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (1):23-50.
    The views on plagiarism of 574 students at four Australian universities operating in Singapore were investigated through a survey and interviews. Analysis of students’ responses to different plagiarism scenarios revealed misconceptions and uncertainties about many aspects of plagiarism. Self-plagiarism and reuse of a friend’s work were acceptable to more than one quarter of the students, and nearly half considered collusion to be a legitimate form of collaboration. One quarter of the students also indicated that they would knowingly plagiarize. This should (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  22
    With or Without Empathy: Primary Psychopathy and Difficulty in Identifying Feelings Predict Utilitarian Judgment in Sacrificial Dilemmas.Reina Takamatsu & Jiro Takai - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (1):71-85.
    Drawing from research on moral judgment and affective dysfunction, we examined how trait psychopathy and alexithymia, which are characterized as empathic deficits, relate to utilitarian moral judgments in sacrificial dilemmas. As predicted, primary and secondary psychopathy traits and alexithymia were associated with reduced empathic concern. However, primary psychopathy and difficulty identifying feelings, but not secondary psychopathy and other two alexithymia traits, were associated with utilitarian judgments. Moreover, hierarchical regression analysis showed that primary psychopathy, difficulty identifying feelings, and empathic concern made (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues