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  1.  1
    Getting Real About Taxes: Offshore Tax Sheltering and Realism's Ethic of Responsibility.Gordon Arlen & Carlo Burelli - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):231-258.
    This article tackles the issue of offshore tax sheltering from the perspective of normative political realism. Tax sheltering is a pressing contemporary policy challenge, with hundreds of billions in private assets protected in offshore trusts and shell companies. Indeed, tax sheltering produces a variety of empirical dilemmas that render it a distinctive challenge for global governance. Therefore, it is crucial for normative political theorists to confront this problem. A realist approach offers three distinct advantages, elaborated in the three subsequent sections (...)
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  2.  1
    Introduction: Representing Vulnerable Communities and Future Generations in the Face of Climate Change.Morten Fibieger Byskov & Keith Hyams - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):135-136.
  3.  1
    Who Should Represent Future Generations in Climate Planning?Morten Fibieger Byskov & Keith Hyams - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):199-214.
    Extreme impacts from climate change are already being felt around the world. The policy choices that we make now will affect not only how high global temperatures rise but also how well-equipped future economies and infrastructures are to cope with these changes. The interests of future generations must therefore be central to climate policy and practice. This raises the questions: Who should represent the interests of future generations with respect to climate change? And according to which criteria should we judge (...)
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  4.  2
    Global Climate Governance, Short-Termism, and the Vulnerability of Future Generations.Simon Caney - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):137-155.
    : Many societies are now having to live with the impacts of climate change and are being confronted with heat waves, wildfires, droughts, and rising sea levels. Without radical action, future generations will inherit an even more degraded planet. This raises the question: How can political institutions be reformed to promote justice for future generations and to leave them an ecologically sustainable world? In this essay, I address a particular version of this question; namely: How can supra–state institutions and transnational (...)
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  5.  3
    On the Scope of Institutions for Future Generations: Defending an Expansive Global Constitutional Convention That Protects Against Squandering Generations.Stephen M. Gardiner - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):157-178.
    We are in the early stages of a new “intergenerational turn” in political philosophy. This turn is largely motivated by the threat of global climate change, which makes vivid a serious governance gap surrounding concern for future generations. Unfortunately, there is a lack of fit between most proposed remedies and the nature of the underlying problem. Most notably, many seem to believe that only piecemeal, issue-specific, and predominantly national institutions are needed to fill the intergenerational governance gap. By contrast, I (...)
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  6.  1
    Communities and Climate Change: Why Practices and Practitioners Matter.Marco Grix & Krushil Watene - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):215-230.
    Communities most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, such as reduced access to material resources and increased exposure to adverse weather conditions, are intimately tied to a considerable amount of cultural and biological diversity on our planet. Much of that diversity is bound up in the social practices of Indigenous groups, which is why these practices have great long-term value. Yet, little attention has been given to them by philosophers. Also neglected have been the historical conditions and contemporary realities (...)
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  7.  1
    Climate Justice and Informal Representation.Colin Hickey - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):179-198.
    : What would constitute just representation for the climate vulnerable? My purpose in this essay is to provide a critique of the default frame for approaching this question, as well as to offer a suggestion for expanding our conception of what an adequate answer should include. The standard frame conceives of representing vulnerable climate interests largely in terms of formal mechanisms of representation in technocratic and bureaucratic institutions. I show the limits of that standard approach and caution against the discussion (...)
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  8.  1
    The Terra Nullius of Intellectual Property.Eva Hilberg - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):125-134.
    The current debate over the global distribution of COVID-19 vaccines once again highlights the many shortcomings of the modern intellectual property system, especially when it comes to equitable access to medicines. This essay argues that the conceptual center of struggles over access to new pharmaceuticals rests in the IP system's colonial legacy, which perceives the world as uncharted territory that is ripe for discovery and ownership. This vision of the world as a blank canvas, or terra nullius, sets aside any (...)
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  9.  2
    Sharing Responsibility: The History and Future of Protection From Atrocities, Luke Glanville (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2021), 240 Pp., Cloth $39.95, eBook $39.95. [REVIEW]Melissa Labonte - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):275-278.
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  10.  5
    Holding International Organizations Accountable: Toward a Right to Justification in Global Governance?Theresa Reinold - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):259-271.
    This essay suggests that the accountability trends explored by Stian Øby Johansen and Gisela Hirschmann in their respective monographs should be viewed as indicating the emergence of a right to justification in global governance. Both Johansen and Hirschmann seek to advance the interdisciplinary conversation about the accountability of international organizations—Johansen by developing a normative framework assessing the quality of IO accountability mechanisms, and Hirschmann by seeking to identify the variables that shape the evolution of what she calls pluralist accountability. Building (...)
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  11.  3
    The Meaning of Terrorism, C. A. J. Coady (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021), 240 Pp., Cloth $40, eBook $39.99. [REVIEW]Mark Rigstad - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (2):273-275.
  12.  1
    Identity and Shared Humanity: Reflections on Amartya Sen's Memoir.Deen Chatterjee - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):91-108.
    Amartya Sen's memoir, Home in the World, is a compelling read, giving a fascinating view of the making of the mind of one of the foremost public intellectuals of our time. In reflections on the first three decades of his life—all filled with an amazing range of experiences, encounters, and intellectual explorations that span Asia, Europe, and North America—Sen weaves a comprehensive and interlocking narrative that brings together a unitary worldview where two multi-dimensional themes are juxtaposed throughout the book: the (...)
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  13.  2
    Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War, Samuel Moyn (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2021), 416 Pp., Cloth $30, Paperback $20, eBook $14.99. [REVIEW]Mary L. Dudziak - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):109-111.
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  14.  2
    Should German Courts Prosecute Syrian International Crimes? Revisiting the “Dual Foundation” Thesis.Yuna Han - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):37-63.
    Should Germany be prosecuting crimes committed in Syria pursuant to universal jurisdiction? This article revisits the normative questions raised by UJ—the principle that a state can prosecute serious international crimes such as genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes committed by foreigners outside of its territories—against the backdrop of increasing European UJ proceedings regarding Syrian conflict–related crimes, focusing on Germany as an illustrative example. While existing literature justifies UJ on the basis of universal prohibition of certain atrocities, this creates residual (...)
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  15. Delta Democracy: Pathways to Incremental Civic Revolution in Egypt and Beyond, Catherine E. Herrold (New York: Oxford University Press, 2020), 224 Pp., Cloth $105, Paperback $31.95, eBook $21.99. [REVIEW]James Ketterer - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):114-117.
  16.  7
    Moral Injury and Revisionist Just War Theory.Jesse Kirkpatrick - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):27-35.
    As part of the roundtable, “Moral Injury, Trauma, and War,” this essay explores the relationship between revisionist just war theory and moral injury. It proceeds in four sections. First, it offers a brief overview of the just war tradition, focusing on traditionalist and revisionist accounts, respectively. Next, it explores the relationship between moral injury and armed conflict. Then, it explores the links between moral injury and revisionist accounts of just war theory. Finally, by way of conclusion, the essay signals two (...)
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  17. The End Days of the Fourth Eelam War: Sri Lanka's Denialist Challenge to the Laws of War.Megan Price - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):65-89.
    During the final months of Sri Lanka's 2006–2009 civil war, Sri Lankan armed forces engaged in a disproportionate and indiscriminate shelling campaign against the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, which culminated in the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians. Conventional wisdom suggests that Sri Lanka undermined international humanitarian law. Significantly, however, the Sri Lankan government did not directly challenge such law or attempt to justify its departure from it. Rather, it invented a new set of facts about its conduct (...)
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  18.  1
    Moral Injury and the Lived Experience of Political Violence.Daniel Rothenberg - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):15-25.
    Moral injury names how the lived experience of armed conflict can damage an individual's ethical foundations, often with serious consequences. While the term has gained increasing acceptance for the clinical treatment of veterans and as a means of better understanding the impact of war, it is generally applied to individualized trauma. As part of the roundtable, “Moral Injury, Trauma, and War,” this essay argues that moral injury is also a useful means of addressing political violence at a societal level. It (...)
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  19. The “Third” United Nations: How a Knowledge Ecology Helps the UN Think, Tatiana Carayannis and Thomas G. Weiss (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021), 224 Pp., Cloth $85, eBook $84.99. [REVIEW]Michael J. Struett - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):111-114.
  20.  2
    The War Is Over but the Moral Pain Continues.David Wood - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):7-13.
    Almost five million Americans volunteered to serve in the U.S. armed forces between 2001 and 2021 and returned home as discharged veterans. Among them, 30,177 men and women have taken their own lives, an awful toll that is more than five times the number of Americans killed in combat in our twenty-first century wars. As part of the roundtable, “Moral Injury, Trauma, and War,” this essay argues that the reasons are many, but one major factor may be the moral pain (...)
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