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  1.  69
    Justifying Lockdown.Christian Barry & Seth Lazar - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 2020.
    Our aim in this brief essay is not to defend a particular policy or attitude toward lockdown measures in the United States or elsewhere, but to consider the scope and limits of different types of arguments that can be offered for them. Understanding the complexity of these issues will, we hope, go some way to helping us understand each other and our attitudes toward state responses to the pandemic.
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  2.  6
    Rescuing Human Rights: A Radically Moderate Approach, Hurst Hannum (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2019), 240 Pp., $89.99 Cloth, $32.99 Paper, $26 eBook. [REVIEW]Clair Apodaca - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):111-113.
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  3.  5
    Introduction: Taking World Peace Seriously.Alex J. Bellamy - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):43-45.
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  4.  4
    Thinking About World Peace.Alex J. Bellamy - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):47-56.
    For as long as humans have fought wars, we have been beguiled and frustrated by the prospect of world peace. Only a very few of us today believe that world peace is possible. Indeed, the very mention of the term “world peace” raises incredulity. In contrast, as part of the roundtable “World Peace,” this essay makes the case for taking world peace more seriously. It argues that world peace is possible, though neither inevitable nor irreversible. World peace, I argue, is (...)
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  5.  1
    World Peace Is Local Peace.Pamina Firchow - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):57-65.
    Today we live in a world where the majority of wars are no longer interstate, a development that over the last few decades has often left the international community, in particular the United Nations as it was originally conceived, ill equipped to respond. The nimble action required for contemporary conflict resolution and peacebuilding now primarily lies in the hands of local actors and states, sometimes supported by international actors. But it is not always clear who these local actors are or (...)
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  6.  2
    Hypocritical Inhospitality: The Global Refugee Crisis in the Light of History.Luke Glanville - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):3-12.
    One of the justifications offered by European imperial powers for the violent conquest, subjection, and, often, slaughter of indigenous peoples in past centuries was those peoples’ violation of a duty of hospitality. Today, many of these same powers—including European Union member states and former settler colonies such as the United States and Australia—take increasingly extreme measures to avoid granting hospitality to refugees and asylum seekers. Put plainly, whereas the powerful once demanded hospitality from the vulnerable, they now deny it to (...)
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  7.  1
    Toward a Social-Democratic Peace?Nils Petter Gleditsch - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):67-75.
    The decline in organized violence in the period after World War II provides the promise of a more peaceful future. How can we move further in this direction? Democratic peace—the absence of armed violence between democracies and the domestic peace of mature democracies—may provide part of the answer. This phenomenon is a well-established empirical regularity, but its mechanisms and its limits remain a subject of continuing research. The key role of democracy in reducing violence has been challenged by alternative explanations, (...)
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  8.  5
    Life, Death, Inertia, Change: The Hidden Lives of International Organizations.Julia Gray - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):33-42.
    The life spans of international organizations can take unexpected turns. But when we reduce IO life spans simply to their existence or lack thereof, or to formal change involving the addition of new members or the revision of charters, we miss the subtler dynamics within IOs. A broader continuum of IO life spans acknowledges life, death, inertia, and change as responses to crises, and affords a more nuanced perspective on international cooperation. Through this lens, the setbacks that many IOs are (...)
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  9.  7
    Toward Peace.A. C. Grayling - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):77-84.
    As part of the roundtable “World Peace,” this essay argues that an ideal state of peace might not be attainable, but a positive form of peace could be achieved on a global scale if states and peoples made a serious investment—comparable to their investment in military expenditure—in promoting the kind of mutual cultural understanding that reduces tensions and divisions and fosters cooperation. Peacemaking usually focuses on diplomatic and military détente; the argument in this essay is that these endeavors, though obviously (...)
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  10.  5
    Why Would I Be a Whistleblower?Adam Henschke - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):97-109.
    The ethics of whistleblowing are complex and challenging. On the one hand, there are a strong set of moral reasons why someone ought to blow the whistle when he or she learns of wrongdoing. On the other hand, such actions typically come at a significant cost to the whistleblower and may not bring about any significant change. Both aspects prompt us to ask, why would I be a whistleblower? Emanuela Ceva and Michele Bocchiola's Is Whistleblowing a Duty? answers that question (...)
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  11.  5
    Towards a Westphalia for the Middle East, Patrick Milton, Michael Axworthy, and Brendan Simms (New York: Oxford University Press2019), 176 Pp., $39.95 Cloth, $38.99 eBook. [REVIEW]Raslan Ibrahim - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):114-116.
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  12.  3
    Clear and Present Safety: The World Has Never Been Better and Why That Matters to Americans, Michael A. Cohen and Micah Zenko (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2019), 272 Pp., $27.50 Cloth. [REVIEW]John Mueller - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):116-118.
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  13.  4
    On American Values, Unalienable Rights, and Human Rights: Some Reflections on the Pompeo Commission.Mathias Risse - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):13-31.
    In July 2019, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo launched a Commission on Unalienable Rights, charged with a reexamination of the scope and nature of human rights–based claims. From his statements, it seems that Pompeo hopes the commission will substantiate—by appeal to the U.S. Declaration of Independence and to natural law theory—three key conservative ideas: that there is too much human rights proliferation, and once we get things right, social and economic rights as well as gender emancipation and reproductive rights will (...)
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  14.  3
    Continuums of Violence and Peace: A Feminist Perspective.Jacqui True - 2020 - Ethics and International Affairs 34 (1):85-95.
    What does world peace mean? Peace is more than the absence and prevention of war, whether international or civil, yet most of our ways of conceptualizing and measuring peace amount to just that definition. In this essay, as part of the roundtable “World Peace,” I argue that any vision of world peace must grapple not only with war but with the continuums of violence and peace emphasized by feminists: running from the home and community to the public spaces of international (...)
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