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  1.  3
    Nourishing Humanity Without Destroying the Planet.Anne Barnhill & Jessica Fanzo - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):69-81.
    As part of the roundtable, “Ethics and the Future of the Global Food System,” this essay discusses some of the major challenges we will face in feeding the world in 2050. A first challenge is nutritional: 690 million people are currently undernourished, while 2.1 billion adults are overweight or obese. The current global food system is insufficient in ensuring that the nutritious foods that make up healthy diets are available and accessible for the world's population. Moreover, by 2050, as the (...)
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  2.  1
    Interrogation and Torture: Integrating Efficacy with Law and Morality, Steven J. Barela, Mark Fallon, Gloria Gaggioli, and Jens David Ohlin, Eds. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2020), 624 Pp., Cloth $99, eBook $79.99. [REVIEW]Mark Berlin - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):159-161.
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  3.  9
    Arguments for Well-Regulated Capitalism, and Implications for Global Ethics, Food, Environment, Climate Change, and Beyond.Mark Budolfson - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):83-98.
    Discourse on food ethics often advocates the anti-capitalist idea that we need less capitalism, less growth, and less globalization if we want to make the world a better and more equitable place. This idea is also familiar from much discourse in global ethics, environment, and political theory, more generally. However, many experts argue that this anti-capitalist idea is not supported by reason and argument, and is actually wrong. As part of the roundtable, “Ethics and the Future of the Global Food (...)
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  4.  5
    Territorial Sovereignty: A Philosophical Exploration, Anna Stilz (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019), 304 Pp., Cloth $35.95, eBook $34.99. [REVIEW]Helder De Schutter - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):161-164.
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  5.  1
    COVID-19 as a Mass Death Event.Yuna Han, Katharine M. Millar & Martin J. Bayly - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):5-17.
    As of the first week of February 2021, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in over two million people dead across the globe. This essay argues that in order to fully understand the politics arising from the COVID-19 pandemic, we need to focus on the individual and collective experiences of death, loss, and grief. While the emerging scholarly discourse on the pandemic, particularly in political science and international relations, typically considers death only in terms of its effects on formal state-level politics (...)
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  6.  3
    Rethinking the Nature of States and Political Violence.Adam Henschke - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):145-158.
    It is a long-held belief that states must retain the monopoly over political violence in order to be states, and to survive. However, there are recent criticisms of this view forcing us to consider not just the state's use of political violence but the very nature of the state. Elizabeth Frazer and Kimberly Hutchings's Can Political Violence Ever Be Justified? argues that it cannot. Ned Dobos's Ethics, Security, and the War-Machine raises a series of arguments against states having standing militaries, (...)
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  7. The Neglected North Korean Crisis: Women's Rights.Sea Young Kim & Leif-Eric Easley - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):19-29.
    North Korea references gender equality in its socialist constitution, but the de facto social and legal circumstances that women face in the country are far below the de jure status they are purported to enjoy. North Korean women endure extremely low public health standards and pervasive harassment. Yet their growing market power and social influence are underestimated. Women account for the majority of North Korean border crossers, and their informal economic activities are supporting families while modernizing the economy. This essay (...)
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  8.  3
    Resources for the People—but Who Are the People? Mistaken Nationalism in Resource Sovereignty.Christopher Kutz - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):119-144.
    Arguments about the ownership of natural resources have focused on the claims of cosmopolitans, who urge an equality of global claims to resources, and resource sovereigntists, who argue that national peoples are the proper owners of their resources. This focus is mistaken: Whatever one believes about the in-principle claims of the global community, there remains the practical question of how the national surplus is to be distributed. And in addressing this question, we must look at a distinction heretofore ignored in (...)
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  9.  3
    Introduction: Ethics and the Future of the Global Food System.Madison Powers - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):31-33.
    The coming decades will present an immense challenge for the planet: sustainably feeding nearly ten billion people that are expected to be alive by 2050. This is no small task, and one that intersects with climate change, geopolitics, the increased globalization of agricultural markets, and the emergence of new technologies. The world faces a challenge of increased demand, propelled by an expanding world population and a global shift in dietary patterns toward more resource-intensive foods. Moreover, changes in demand occur in (...)
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  10.  1
    Subversive Future Seeks Like-Minded Model: On the Mismatch Between Visions of Food Sovereignty Futures and Quantified Scenarios of Global Food Futures.Yashar Saghai - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):51-67.
    Will we, by 2050, be able to feed a rapidly growing population with healthy and sustainably grown food in a world threatened by systemic environmental crises? There are too many uncertainties for us to predict the long-term evolution of the global agri-food system, but we can explore a wide range of futures to inform policymaking and public debate on the future of food. This is typically done by creating scenarios and quantifying them with computer simulation models to get numerical estimates (...)
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  11.  1
    The Consequences of National Humiliation, Joslyn Barnhart (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2020), 270 Pp., Cloth $47.95, eBook $23.99. [REVIEW]Paul Saurette - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):164-167.
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  12.  2
    Food System Transformation and the Role of Gene Technology: An Ethical Analysis.Paul B. Thompson - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (1):35-49.
    The global food system exhibits dizzying complexity, with interaction among social, economic, biological, and technological factors. Opposition to the first generation of plants and animals transformed through rDNA-enabled gene transfer has been a signature episode in resistance to the forces of industrialization and globalization in the food system. Yet agricultural scientists continue to tout gene technology as an essential component in meeting future global food needs. An ethical analysis of the debate over gene technologies reveals the details that matter. On (...)
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